Bulbs

BULBS for COLORADO GARDENS

At Harlequin’s Gardens, we have been experimenting for years with bulbs in our display gardens. Since our gardens are xeriscapes (by default even where not by design), we have had the pleasure of discovering that a great many delightful bulbs can thrive and naturalize in our conditions and enliven the scene in spring and fall. No surprise, really, since most of these hardy spring and autumn-blooming bulbs originated in parts of the world with conditions much like ours, such as Central Asia. Visitors to our gardens have been wowed by enormous Star of Persia Alliums and brilliant sapphire miniature iris, and charmed by perky miniature daffodils and starry species tulips and crocus. They (you) kept asking us “where can I get these?”, so in 2008, we carefully selected our first-ever offering of bulbs for sale at Harlequin’s Gardens.

Since then, we have added more than 30 wonderful varieties. The bulb list below may change from year to year. Of the varieties listed, we expect to receive most in early- September, the rest in mid to late September.  Quantities are limited and may sell out quickly. We recommend that you purchase your bulbs in September and hold them for planting when the soil is cooler (except Saffron Crocus and Crocus speciosus, which should be planted as soon as possible).  Planting depths are to the bottom of the planting hole where the base of the bulb rests.  Planting depth can vary depending on how light or heavy your soil is – plant deeper in light soils, shallower in heavier soils. Single Early, Triumph, Darwin Hybrid, and Multi-flowering tulips should be planted 8″ deep to perform as perennials, and fertilized each year just after bloom. Be sure to allow the leaves and stems to wither naturally before cutting them down.

Here are some ideas for ways and places to use bulbs that you may not have thought of. One idea is to plant small early-blooming bulbs, such as many of the species tulips, where the ground is exposed in spring but will be covered in summer by spreading herbaceous perennials like Desert Four-O’Clock (Mirabilis multiflora), ‘Orange Carpet’ California Fuschia (Zauschneria garrettii), or Wine Cups (Callirhoe involucrata). Also, meadows and drifts of ornamental grasses are usually dormant until mid to late spring, and present a perfect stage for a brilliant display of many types of early spring bulbs. Deciduous groundcovers that emerge in mid-spring, like Plumbago (Ceratostigma plumbaginoides), can partner nicely with Iris reticulata and small species tulips.

Bulbs for indoor bloom:

  • Amaryllis ‘Evergreen’
  • Amaryllis ‘Minerva,
  • Amaryllis ‘Mont Blanc’
  • Amaryllis ‘Pink Rascal’
  • Amaryllis ‘Red Lion’
  • Amaryllis ‘Red Rascal’
  • Hyacinth ‘Blue Jacket’
  • Hyacinth ‘Delft Blue’
  • Hyacinth ‘Peter Stuyvesant’
  • Hyacinth ‘Woodstock
  • Narcissus ‘Grand Soleil d’Or’
  • Narcissus forcing Ziva Paperwhites

–>

Garlic
Garlic planting instructions
Garlic – Spanish Roja:(hardneck variety)
This vigorous, easy-to-grow heirloom variety arrived in the US over 100 years ago. It is famous for its classic rich, complex ‘true garlic’ flavor and is one of the most popular with restaurants/chefs. The large, purple streaked bulbs often reach three inches in diameter and typically have seven to twelve large tan cloves. Spanish Roja peels easily and keeps for up to 4-6 months when properly stored (the outer bulb wrappers are thin and flake off easily so be careful to keep them intact to prolong storage). Like all hard-neck garlic, Spanish Roja will produce curly ‘scapes’ (flowering stems), which can be snipped off and used for another culinary treat in late spring.  This variety grows well in cold winter areas, and is cold-hardy to Zone 3.ALSO:
Chesnok Red (Hardneck) – tasty, hardy, the very best for roasting/baking!
Ellensburg Blue Porcelain (Hardneck)
Inchelium Red (Softneck) – long-keeping, big, easy to peel, tasty
Italian Late (Softneck) – long-keeping, big, easy-peel, tasty, pretty

Shallot - Holland Red Shallots – Holland Yellow
Shallots are aromatic and flavorful, yet smoother and sweeter than Onions or Garlic, and act as a catalyst in recipes, subtly enhancing other flavors. They are mild and delicate when cooked. If onions are at all upsetting to your stomach, you’ll find Shallots much easier to digest and less sharp smelling, both raw and cooked. Shallots are easy to grow, and each set produces a whole cluster of bulbs. ‘Holland Red’ delivers  mellow, quintessential Shallot flavor in a plump, round bulb with coppery-red skins that peel easily, and purple-tinged white flesh with reddish-purple inner rings. A super-productive variety and an excellent keeper that can be braided and hung in your kitchen or pantry.  They keep this way for up to 1 year! ‘Holland Yellow’ provides most of the same qualities, but has white flesh and tan-yellow skins.Grow in full sun, spaced 4-6” apart in rich loamy soil. Cold-hardy to Zone 3.

De Vroomen
Allium aflatunense ‘Purple Sensation’ GIANT PURPLE-FLOWERED ONION
Hardy to Zone 4,  18”-36” tall
Dense, four-inch diameter globes of starry red-purple florets atop stems up to 24” to 36” tall. Very showy, and the earliest large-flowered ornamental onions, blooming in mid-spring. Thrives in full sun to part-shade, and naturalizes by self-sowing. Stunning, long-lasting cut-flower. The dry seed-heads are also highly ornamental in the garden and in flower arrangements. Grow amid perennials that will mound over the foliage when it has dried, such as Saponaria ‘Max Frei’, or among tall, ‘architectural’ perennials such as ‘Moonshine’ Yarrow. Alliums are resistant to browsing by deer and rabbits. Plant 6-8″ deep, 6-12″ apart.
Allium christophii (syn. Allium albopilosum) STAR of PERSIA
Hardy to Zone 4,  14”- 24” tall, Plant 6” – 8” deep and 8” – 10” apart
A most surprising, outrageous flower for xeriscapes! The giant globes, to 10” diameter or more, are held on fairly short stems, 8” – 18” tall, blooming in mid-spring. The hundreds of starry, silver-lavender florets each have a green ‘eye’ are arranged so that their petal-tips touch to form a perfect sphere. This easy naturalizer has been highly successful in our xeriscape display gardens, eliciting lots of interest. Also spectacular in large flower arrangements, fresh or dried. Deer and rabbit resistant, and very drought-tolerant. If you don’t want it to naturalize, dead-head before the seeds mature.
al_amplectens_graceful_beauty Allium amplectens Graceful Beauty
Circa 1857, this delicate-looking yet easy-growing North American native has composite 3″ globes of star-shaped, sparkling white flowers with pale lavender stamens tipped with purple anthers and sturdy stems. Bloom time: May/June. 12″ to 16″. HZ: 4-8.
Image result for Allium 'Bubble Blend' Allium ‘Bubble Blend’
A lively mix of various hardy, medium size Allium blooms for the late spring garden. White and various shades of purple ball shaped blooms sit atop tall stems. Alliums offer wonderful nectar sources for bees of all kinds. Zone 5. For best results plant bulbs in groups of 3-5 per hole.
Image result for Amaryllis evergreen Amaryllis ‘Evergreen’
20” tall. Originally hybridized in South America, ‘Evergreen’ has narrow, somewhat spidery flower petals that appear more species-like than their big saucer-shaped cousins. ‘Evergreen’ is very pale yellow-green with a deeper incandescent apple-green starburst. It need not be forced into dormancy, but can be grown as a year-round houseplant, flowering at will.
Image result for Amaryllis MinervaGardening-Advice.net Amaryllis ‘Minerva’
Related image Amaryllis ‘Mont Blanc’
Image result for Amaryllis pink rascal Amaryllis ‘Pink Rascal’
20” tall. This lovely pale pink amaryllis blooms from a small size, with even offsets blooming in its second year. These bulbs are smaller than standard amaryllis, but fully capable of blooming their first year. Produces 7-8 blooms per stem. Makes a very full display in a pot.
Image result for Amaryllis Red Lion Amaryllis ‘Red Lion’
Image result for Amaryllis red rascal Amaryllis ‘Red Rascal’
20” tall. This stunning, deep red amaryllis blooms from a small size, with even offsets blooming in its second year. These bulbs are smaller than standard amaryllis, but fully capable of blooming their first year. Produces 7-8 blooms per stem. Makes a very full display in a pot.
Anemone-blanda-Blue-Shade Anemone blanda ‘Blue Shades’ BLUE GRECIAN WINDFLOWER Hardy to Zone 5, 3-4” tall, An enchanting, early-blooming member of the Buttercup family that grows from a tuber. Where happy, it spreads to form a carpet-like groundcover with ferny deep green foliage and 1”- wide open-faced sky-blue daisy flowers with yellow eyes. Provides a long-lasting display in early spring. Works well under daffodils and tulips, in rock gardens, or in masses under deciduous shrubs and trees. Prefers a humus-rich soil, average moisture and good drainage in a sunny or partly shaded location.
Brodeia ‘Queen Fabiola’
18-24″ tall. Late Spring, Early Summer,  Hardy to Zone 5
A wonderful Western US native wildflower bulb valued for its clusters of violet-blue, upward-facing flowers. ‘Queen Fabiola’ is lovely companion for relatively short perennials that bloom in late May and June, like ‘Coral Canyon’ Twinspur or ‘Elfin Pink’ Beardtongue. She also makes a long lasting and graceful cut flower . The dark green foliage is slender and grass-like. ‘Queen Fabiola’ is easy to grow in full sun or morning sun and well-drained soil.
Chionodoxa forbesii Chionodoxa forbesii (lavender)
Blue Glory of the Snow is a deer proof bulb with compact 6-8” spikes of cheerful, white eyed, bright blue flowers in early spring. Chionodoxa is very attractive when planted in large drifts of many bulbs, and naturalizes readily. Plant in full sun or morning sun, 2-4” deep, 16 bulbs per sq. ft. or 4” apart. Cold hardy to Zone 3.
Image result for Chionodoxa luciliae alba Chionodoxa luciliae alba
Lovely and easy, this naturalizing Glory of the Snow is among the first flowers of the year, and will succeed in most soils and locations, forming a spreading carpet of glistening white in very early spring. Each 6” stem holds 5 to 10 pure white starry flowers. Consider planting in lawns, under fruit trees, in open ‘woodland’ gardens, rock gardens, and to under-plant early Narcissus. Foliage disappears by late spring. Native to mountainsides in Western Turkey. Cold-hardy to Zone 3, sun to part shade, deer-resistant. Plant bulbs 3” deep and 2-3” apart or 9 bulbs per square foot. Photo by Van Engelen
Image result for Crocus chrysanthus ‘Romance’ Crocus chrysanthus ‘Romance’
Blooming in very early spring, these sprightly and luminous botanical Crocus are delightful in masses and in rock gardens and perennial gardens. These diminutive, 3-6” tall, easy and long-lived beauties will naturalize, rapidly increasing in size of clumps and duration of bloom. On cloudy days, the Naples yellow exteriors of the cupped petals will present a soft glow, and on sunny days, the egg-yolk gold interiors shine like the sun. Adaptable soil and water requirements, cold-hardy to Zone 3. For massing, plant 10 to 15 bulbs per square foot.
Image result for crocus chrysanthus snow bunting Crocus chrysanthus ‘Snowbunting’
Winner of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit in 1993, Snow Bunting is still among the finest botanical Crocus selections. In very early spring, the clear white blossoms open in the sun to reveal their orange stigmas surrounded by a glowing golden base and anthers. When closed, delicate purple feathering on the petal exteriors decorates the blooms. Reliable, heavy-blooming and a great naturalizer for rock gardens, drifts, etc.! 3-6” tall, Plant in sun or light shade, cold-hardy to Zone 3.
Related image Crocus vernus Vanguard (purple)

Zone 4, 4” tall.Elegant bicolor blooms of light and medium purple pop up in early spring. One of Eve’s favorites!


 Image result for Mixed Crocus Vernus Mixed Crocus vernus (Large-flowered ‘Dutch’ Crocus, mixed colors)
Crocus vernus varieties bloom later and have larger flowers than ‘botanical’ crocus.  They create a big, cheerful splash of color in the spring garden that few hardy plants can achieve. This mix contains a compatible blend of purple, yellow, white and striped varieties that will all bloom at the same time.  Grow in masses or drifts for the best effect.  The display will grow more spectacular every year, and is sure to cure your winter blues!  Plant 8 to 10 bulbs per square foot.
Crocus seiberi-Tricolor
De Vroomen
Crocus seiberi ‘Tricolor’
3” tall, Hardy to Zone 3, plant 3-4” deep, 3-4” apart
One of the finest of the winter-blooming ‘snow’ crocuses, this unique little beauty bears remarkable blossoms,  bright lilac-blue at the edges, bright orange in the center, the two colors separated by a broad band of white banded with yellow and white, held on striking dark brown ‘stems’ (actually the long narrow throats of the stemless flowers). Planted in quantity, ‘Tricolor’ produces the same enchanting effect as a Crocus mixture, but all at once. And it’s fragrant, too! Winner of the Award of Garden Merit from the RHS. ‘Tricolor’ naturalizes readily, and is perfect for rock-gardens, between stepping stones and along paths, under deciduous trees and shrubs, in drifts, lawns, etc.  Grow in well-drained soil. ‘Tricolor’ multiplies best in a watered location even during summer dormancy. Native to southern Greece. 
Crocus sativus Crocus sativus SAFFRON CROCUS Sold Out for 2017
Hardy to Zone 6,   4” – 5” tall This fall-blooming crocus emerges as a cheery surprise in October or November with bright violet-purple open cupped petals and brilliant orange stigmas, the source of the precious spice, saffron. The blooms are accompanied by short blades of dark green, grass-like foliage which elongates after the flowers have finished and may re-appear in spring. Wonderful in the sunny rock garden, and amongst low, xeric groundcovers such as Turkish Veronica or ‘Tough-as-Nails’ (Paronychia kapela). Saffron Crocus prefers a location that is warm, sunny and dry, with very good drainage and only wants moisture when it is in flower and active growth.  Plant 2-4″ deep, 3″ apart.
Image result for crocus speciosus albus Crocus speciosus albus (White Autumn Crocus) Sold out for 2017
Blooming in mid-autumn, the fall-blooming crocus blooms arrive to brighten the garden at a time when little else is blooming.  This selection, dating back to 1913, bears refreshing white blossoms with pointed petals and a yellow base.  They will naturalize, and over the years, the clumps increase in size and duration of bloom. Average soil and moisture, full to part sun, most soils except heavy clay, cold-hardy to Zone 4. PLANT THESE AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE to enjoy blooms this fall! For drifts, plant 10 bulbs per square foot.
Image result for Crocus speciosus 'Conqueror' Crocus speciosus ‘Conqueror’ (Conqueror Autumn Crocus) Sold out for 2017
A superb selection of the blue Fall Crocus, Conqueror blooms in early to mid-autumn, arriving to brighten the garden at a time when many other plants have finished blooming.  Conqueror’s very large, deep sky blue flowers with golden-orange stigmas and anthers stand 5 or 6” tall and emerge without the narrow grassy foliage that will follow bloom. They will naturalize, and over the years, the clumps increase in size and duration of bloom. Average soil and moisture, full to part sun, most soils except heavy clay, cold-hardy to Zone 4. PLANT THESE AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE to enjoy flowers this fall! For drifts, plant 10 bulbs per square foot.
 Image result for Galanthus nivalis Galanthus Nivalis
Zone 3, 3” tall. Pendant, bell-shaped white flowers with green-tipped petals are a classic harbinger of sping. They look wonderful planted in groups and may bloom as early as February. Commonly called snowdrop, this bulbous perennial is native to Europe and southwestern Asia. It will naturalize where happy. thrives in rich garden loam in part shade, making it perfect under deciduous trees and shrubs.


Image result for Hyacinth Delft Blue de vroomen Hyacinth ‘Blue Jacket’
All of these highly fragrant Dutch Hyacinth varieties are perfect for spring gardens and for forcing indoors in pots or hyacinth glasses. They are long-lived in the garden if fertilized after blooming, and after the first year they will produce more flower spikes that are less densely packed and more natural-looking. Hyacinths are very easy to grow in a sunny or partly shaded spot.
 Image result for Blue Jacket de vroomen Hyacinth ‘Delft Blue’
All of these highly fragrant Dutch Hyacinth varieties are perfect for spring gardens and for forcing indoors in pots or hyacinth glasses. They are long-lived in the garden if fertilized after blooming, and after the first year they will produce more flower spikes that are less densely packed and more natural-looking. Hyacinths are very easy to grow in a sunny or partly shaded spot.
Hyacinth Peter Stuyvesant Hyacinth Peter Stuyvesant (dark blue)
All of these highly fragrant Dutch Hyacinth varieties are perfect for spring gardens and for forcing indoors in pots or hyacinth glasses. They are long-lived in the garden if fertilized after blooming, and after the first year they will produce more flower spikes that are less densely packed and more natural-looking. Hyacinths are very easy to grow in a sunny or partly shaded spot.
Image result for hyacinth woodstock Hyacinth ‘Woodstock’
All of these highly fragrant Dutch Hyacinth varieties are perfect for spring gardens and for forcing indoors in pots or hyacinth glasses. They are long-lived in the garden if fertilized after blooming, and after the first year they will produce more flower spikes that are less densely packed and more natural-looking. Hyacinths are very easy to grow in a sunny or partly shaded spot.

De Vroomen
Ipheion ‘Rolf Fiedler’ SPRING STARFLOWER
Hardy to Zone 5,   3” – 5” tall, Plant 3-5″ deep, 3-4″ apart, deer/rabbit resistant
A spring gem for dry or moderately watered gardens in shade and part-shade. This long-blooming bulb from Chile and Uruguay sends up a mound of grassy foliage in autumn that persists over winter and begins blooming in early spring, producing a long succession of sweetly fragrant starry cobalt blue flowers through late spring, each atop its own 3” – 6” stem. Multiplies to form a groundcover until summer when the foliage goes dormant. Fantastic under trees and shrubs, or out in the open. Also lovely planted under taller mid-spring bulbs such as ‘Tete a Tete’ miniature daffodils.

Succeeds in a wide range of soils, but like most bulbs, requires reasonably good drainage.

Image result for Iris reticulata Katharine Gold Iris x histrioides ‘Katharine’s Gold’
Katherine’s Gold is a newly-available sport from the pale gray-blue old favorite, Katharine Hodgkin.  This lovely new jewel grows 4” tall and has soft yellow and white flowers, with attractive indigo markings on the falls. Katharine’s Gold was awarded a garden merit by the RHS because it is so reliable and easy to establish in the garden. Flowering soon after the snowdrops (often in February or early March), botanical iris quickly develop into gorgeous, densely floriferous clumps and excel in the rock garden or perennial bed. Plant in part to full sun, in well-drained soil. Planting in very hot locations will shorten the duration of bloom. In heavier soil, add expanded shale to improve drainage. Cold hardy to Zone 5.
Iris_Reticulata_Alida_15_FM Iris reticulata Alida
New fragrant dwarf species. Soft sky blue flowers with pale yellow markings on the falls appear before the leaves. Perfect to add color to your garden at the end of winter. Alida multiplies very rapidly in the garden and is one of the earliest bulbs to flower. Suitable for rock gardens or garden borders.

De Vroomen
Iris reticulata ‘Harmony’
Hardy to Zone 4,  4” -8” tall, Deer-Resistant, Plant 4” deep and 4-5” apart
Blooming very early, along with species crocus, these miniature irises are brilliant harbingers of spring. They are best for naturalizing in the rock garden or flower border, and increase vigorously. The flowers, though brief, are like richly-colored jewels, and are spectacular when planted in large drifts. Blooms are followed by attractive, erect, dark green, narrow foliage. Prefers humus-rich soil, good drainage, and moderate to low water. Natives of Asia Minor. Iris standards are the inner petals that stand upright, and the falls are the outer petals that open downward.
Ixiolirion pallasiiVan Engelen Ixiolirion pallassii (syn. Ixiolirion tataricum) BLUE MOUNTAIN LILY
Hardy to Zone 5,  10” – 16” tall, Deer-proof! Plant 5” deep, 4” apart.
Native to rocky hillsides from SW and Central Asia (Syria to Afghanistan), this lovely wildflower in the Amaryllis family bears umbels of starry violet-blue flowers with darker midveins above grass-like foliage for 3 to 4 weeks in late May and early June.
Perfect for the well-drained xeriscape garden, this delightful bulb will thrive in a dry, sunny spot where it receives some spring moisture, followed by hot, dry conditions in summer, and will self-sow and naturalize where it’s happy.
Some added bonuses are its resistance to browsing by deer and rabbits and its great performance as a cut flower.
Image result for lilium x martagon 'claude shride'

Photo By Brent & Becky’s Bulbs

Lilium martagon ‘Claude Shride’

We have paraphrased (and substantially shortened) the rave about this hybrid ‘turk’s cap’ lily from Far Reaches specialty nursery in Port Townsend, WA. After reading it, how could you possibly go without trying at least one?

‘Pendulous tiers of mahogany-red flowers with deep orange centers on 4’+ stems that are god-like in their perfection.  An established clump at the peak of bloom is such a sensory overload that you are to be forgiven if you start speaking in tongues or asking if you can have a witness because this will be a religious experience. Martagons have minds of their own and can take the first year off from doing much of anything. They may produce wimpy foot-tall stems that wither soon after, but somehow these same bulbs increase in size dramatically, and rock the house the next year!’

Once established, they tend to be quite long-lived and they increase well.

They do best here in part or filtered shade (out of the hot sun). Blooms 6cm in diameter open in June, and there can be 30 or more blooms on a stem! They are cold-hardy to Zone 3. Protect from tunneling moles, gophers, voles. They may take an additional season before blooming and conditions need to be more exacting than for other types of lilies. Provide perfect drainage: raised beds are good, rocky soil is fine, and don’t over-water the bulbs during summer while they are in dormancy. Under no circumstances use peat for L. martagon or its hybrids, but leaf mold and/or compost as a top dressing in the fall is desirable.

 Image result for Lilium martagon 'Manitoba Morning' de vroomen

Lilium martagon ‘Manitoba Morning’Zone 3, 32” tall. Manitoba Morning features striking recurved petals in reddish-pink with creamy yellow centers speckled with burgundy spots. The recurved, downward-facing petals create a unique display, perfect for borders, walkways and containers. Prefers full sun and moist but well-drained soil. Returning year after year, this lily blooms in early to mid-summer, attracts butterflies, and is as a cut-flower. Compared to other species, this lily has smaller flowers, but it makes up for the flower size by putting up strong stems with up to 50 flowers per stalk! Once established, this Martagon Lily can form a huge, showy clump.


NARCISSUS ALTRUIST Narcissus Altruist
Zone 3, 14-18” tall. This uniquely colored award-winner has a 3 1/2″ copper-yellow six-petaled perianth that pales as it matures, and a shallow, bowl-shaped crimson-orange cup. Blooms in April.
Image result for Narcissus 'Cheerfulness'

Pacific Bulb Society

Narcissus ‘Cheerfulness’

Zone 4, 16” tall. Fragrant and long-lasting double flowers feature creamy-white petals with a yellow center. Multiple blooms on each stem appear in mid or late spring. This classic daffodil can be forced indoors for winter bloom. Grows well in well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Deer and rabbit resistant.

Image result for Narcissus 'Fortune'

Van Engelen

Narcissus ‘Fortune’
Hardy to zone 4-5. Deer and rodent-proof. Plant 6-8″ deep, 6-8″ apart
This very floriferous 1930 Heirloom tazetta hybrid should be planted where you’ll notice and enjoy its strong and heavenly perfume. The late-midseason blooms have a dainty orange-red cups surrounded by large pure white petals and the bulbs produce many out-facing flowers on each 14”-16” stem and increase well, making a striking display and provide wonderful fragrant cut flowers.
Narcissus ‘Geranium’
Hardy to zone 4-5. Deer and rodent-proof. Plant 6-8″ deep, 6-8″ apart
This very floriferous 1930 Heirloom tazetta hybrid should be planted where you’ll notice and enjoy its strong and heavenly perfume. The late-midseason blooms have a dainty orange-red cups surrounded by large pure white petals and the bulbs produce many out-facing flowers on each 14”-16” stem and increase well, making a striking display and provide wonderful fragrant cut flowers.
Image result for Narcissus 'Grand Soleil d'Or' van EngelenVan Engelen
Narcissus ‘Grand Soleil d’Or’ (Forcing narcissus)
12” tall. Beautifully formed, golden yellow petals with an orange cup. They take longer to force than other varieties, but their wonderful, delicate, sweet fragrance is worth waiting for. They grow best when rooted at 55-65 degrees for a couple of weeks and then brought into lots of warmth and light.
Narcissus ‘Jetfire’
Hardy to Zone 3, 8” – 10” tall, Deer-proof! Plant with base of bulb 6” deep
An old favorite for naturalizing, and another Cyclamineus daffodil. Bright and cheerful in the garden, with reflexed vivid yellow petals and orange-red trumpet. ‘Jetfire’ is early blooming, and increases rapidly to form showy colonies. Also good for forcing indoors. Plant 3 times height of bulb, 4-6″ apart.
 Image result for Narcissus 'Lemon Glow'  Narcissus ‘Lemon Glow’

Zone 3, 14” tall. Lemon Glow’s flowers are very large, but their soft yellow perianth and creamy cup with flared margins make them a refined touch to the garden.

 Image result for Narcissus 'New Baby'Van Bloem Gardens  Narcissus ‘New Baby’
 Image result for Narcissus 'Pheasant's Eye'World of Flowering Plants Narcissus ‘Pheasant’s Eye’Zone 3, 14-16” tall. Narcissus poeticus ‘Pheasant’s Eye’ is a very old heirloom variety. The wonderfully fragrant blooms have large, star-shaped, reflexed white petals and a small, yellow, red-edged cup with a green eye. The blooms are both eye-catching and delicate. Blooms in late spring.
Narcissus ‘Quail’
Hardy to Zone 4, 12-14″ tall, planting depth 3 x height of bulb, 4-6″ apart, Deer-proof
Floriferous, sweetly  fragrant and long-blooming, this outstanding naturalizing daffodil bears two to four golden-yellow flowers per 12” – 14” stem in mid-spring, and increases rapidly to form drifts.  The dark green leaves are narrow and reed-like, and easy to hide in the garden while they mature. ‘Quail’ is a beautiful companion for Tulipa bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’. Plant in full sun or part shade.
Narcissus-ThaliaDe Vroomen Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Triandrus type)
6-20” tall, Hardy to Zone 4, plant 6-8”deep, 6” apart, Deer-proof
Lovely, snow-white, fragrant, award-winning Triandrus Narcissus ‘Thalia’ is a gracious, natural beauty that has been a perennial favorite since its introduction in 1916. Thalia bears two to three, pendant, star-shaped flowers per stem, poised above slender, deep green foliage. Also known as the ‘Orchid Narcissus’, this demure heirloom has graceful, spreading, slightly recurved flower petals encircling a long, slightly ribbed, cup-shaped crown. Unlike most ‘white’ narcissi, Thalia opens white and remains white. As long-lived Thalia naturalizes and matures over the years, it may bear up to five flowering stems per bulb in mid-spring. Plant in full sun or part shade, in fertile, well-drained soil. Lends itself to virtually any garden style, from ‘wild woodland’ to formal parterre.
 Image result for Narcissus 'Tresamble' Narcissus ‘Tresamble’

14” tall, zone 3. Up to three sweetly nodding flowers top each of the many stems in mid- to late spring. With a compact habit and strong stems, this narcissus stands up well to rain and wind. The outer petals are creamy white and slightly reflexed, which gives the flower a windswept appearance. The central cup has just a hint of yellow, and is gently ruffled.

narc_cycl_wisley_main_1 Narcissus ‘Wisley’

Zone 3, 12” tall. Named after the famous English garden on the Royal Horticultural Society’s 100th anniversary, this award-winning, compact hybrid has an unusually large flower for its class (Cyclamineus). Early flowering and long lasting, Wisley has a long, funnel-shaped, bright yellow cup with wavy, flared margins. Its graceful, windswept petals open pale yellow and mature to glistening snow-white.


De Vroomen
Narcissus, forcing Ziva (high scent) Paperwhites
Potted Paperwhites bring intoxicating fragrance to your home in winter, and make wonderful holiday gifts. Bears trusses of heavily-scented, pure white flowers on up to three stems per bulb. They may be planted in all kinds of decorative pots, vases and trays, either in soil or pebbles, September through February.
Place the bulbs about 1” apart and cover 2/3 of the bulb with stones, marbles or pebbles, or completely cover the bulbs with potting soil. Water, then place them in a light, cool place in indirect sunlight until the foliage stands 3” to 4” high. Move to a sunny location at room temperature and keep them well watered. They will bloom in four to six weeks from planting. If not potting immediately, store bulbs in a dry, dark spot at 50 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit.
Nectaroscordum bulgaricum

Nectaroscordum bulgaricum SICILIAN HONEY LILY (syn. Allium s. bulgaricum) A fascinating and subtly beautiful flowering onion with a 5” umbrella-shaped inflorescence made up of pendant ¾” plum, green and white bells that come spilling out of an elegant pointed white papery sheath atop a tall stem.  The flowers are richly endowed with nectar and are eagerly visited by honeybees.  After pollination, each individual flower stem slowly turns upright, until the whole cluster is erect.  Both the fresh flowers and dried seedpods make outstanding cut-flowers. The long strappy blue-green leaves twist in a spiral, and are a garlicky edible treat, traditionally ground up with salt, dried, then sprinkled on tomatoes or salads.  Moderate water, to 18” – 36” tall. Full sun. Hardy to zone 5.  Plant 6″ deep, 6″ apart.

Tulipa_bakeri_Lilac_Wonder Tulipa bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ With its sunny yellow heart and lilac pink petals, the 6”-8” ‘Lilac Wonder’ makes a great companion to mid-spring daffodils like ‘Hawera’, ‘Quail’ and silver leafed plants like Lamb’s Ears, Alyssum oxycarpum, Partridge Feather and Teucrium cossonii ‘Silver Form’. A vigorous grower, it naturalizes well and is useful in xeriscapes as well as rock gardens and traditional bulb borders. Plant in full sun; Lilac Wonder likes to bake in the summer. Hardy to Zone 5.  Plant 5-8″ deep, 3-4″ apart.
Tulipa clusiana Tinka Tulipa clusiana Tinka
Zone 3
8” tall
‘Tinka’s is a selection of the ‘Lady Tulip’, a species native to Afghanistan, Iran, Irak, Pakistan, and the western Himalayas. It naturalizes easily and is ideal for mass plantings in sunny, gardens. A striking bi-color flower with rose-red outer petals and creamy-yellow inner petals and dark purple anthers on graceful stems above narrow foliage. The flowers are as attractive closed as they are when open-wide. Blooms mid-late spring. Fertilize annually after bloom and divide clumps every few years for best flowering.
Tulipa Couleur Cardinal Tulipa ‘Couleur Cardinal’ Hardy to Zone 3, 12” tall, Plant 6” – 8” deep and 6” apart An heirloom variety of Single Early tulip (1845) Couleuer Cardinal is stunning in our Xeriscape Rock Garden in mid-April. The lustrous, cup-shaped, fragrant flowers are smoldering scarlet-red flushed with plum, and are held on strong stems that stand up to wind and rain. Plant amongst summer perennials that will gain height later in the season, such as sages and echinaceas. This variety has perennialized in our garden, and is also known as one of the best potting tulips for Easter.
Image result for Tulipa Daydream Tulipa ‘Daydream’ 
Zone 3
22” tall
This Darwin hybrid tulip is one of the largest, strongest, and easiest tulips to grow. Will perform as a perennial for many years if left un-picked and fertilized annually. The lightly fragrant flowers start out yellow and mature to apricot-orange, creating a multi-color display. Full sun. Blooms mid spring.

Van Engelen
Tulipa griegii ‘Red Riding Hood’
Hardy to Zone 3, 8” – 10” tall, Plant 6” – 8” deep and 6” apart
Greigii tulips are famous for their showy foliage, which is often dramatically mottled and streaked with deep purple or maroon markings, and their large, colorful blooms. Their short stature makes them perfect for the rock garden, front of the border, or forcing. The very popular ‘Red Riding Hood’ bears large, long-lasting vivid scarlet flowers with striking black bases in April-May. Blooms just after the Kaufmanniana tulips. This variety has perennialized well in our Xeriscape Rock Garden.
 Image result for Tulipa 'Happy Generation' Tulipa ‘Happy Generation’
Zone 3, 20” tall. Large and long lasting, the white petals of ‘Happy Generation’ are splashed with bright red flames and hints of yellow, making for a stunning and festive tulip. Each bloom is unique. The long sturdy stems put up with wind and rain. Blooms mid to late spring. Will perform as a perennial for many years if left un-picked and fertilized annually.
Havran Tulipa ‘Havran’

Zone 3, 18” tall. Unique in both color and form, ‘Havran’ has beautiful dark maroon, pointed petals and is often multi-flowered. Will perform as a perennial for many years if left un-picked and fertilized annually. A dramatic addition to your garden. Combines beautifully with pink, red, orange, and lavender varieties. Blooms in April.

tul_species_humilis_persian_pearl_main Tulipa humilis ‘Persian Pearl’

Zone 3, 4” tall. Persian Pearl Wildflower Tulip is uniquely colored with showy purple-red petals and a bright yellow center. Like most of the wildflower tulips, Tulipa h. ‘Persian Pearl’ multiplies itself readily. Fragrant. Said to be deer-resistant! Early to mid-spring bloom. Full sun to part shade. Thrives in moderate to low-water gardens.

Tulipa kaufanniana 'The First'Van Engelen Tulipa kaufmanniana ‘The First’ (Waterlily Tulip)
A gorgeous, sturdy, low-growing (8”) naturalizing tulip, perfect for the rock garden, meadow or perennial border. ‘The First’ is very early, blooming in March or April. When closed, the red and white outer petals present a candy-cane striped effect. On sunny days, they open wide (~4″) and look like single waterlilies, revealing an ivory white interior with a bright yellow center and, sometimes, small coral-red markings. Hardy to Zone 3. Plant 6” deep, 6” apart.
Image result for Tulipa Kelly Tulipa ‘Kelly’

Zone 3, 18” tall. This flashy, strong-stemmed tulip has classically-formed blooms with rosy-red petals edged in white. A classic tulip for the spring garden. Will perform as a perennial for many years if left un-picked and fertilized annually. Blooms in May.

Image result for Tulipa Light and Dreamy van engelen Tulipa ‘Light & Dreamy’

Zone 3, 28-30” tall. One of the tallest Darwin Hybrid tulips. ‘Light and Dreamy’ is a fascinating blend of light pink and lavender. The blooms are long-lasting, starting mid-late spring. Will perform as a perennial for many years if left un-picked and fertilized annually.

Tulipa linifoliaPacific Bulb Society Tulipa linifolia (Flax-leaved or Bokhara Tulip)
A species native to the steppes of central Asia. Growing to 8” tall, it sports stunning, bowl-shaped, brilliant scarlet flowers above narrow, wavy, red-margined sword-shaped leaves in mid-spring. Each shiny petal has a black base and a pointed tip. An excellent naturalizer, and a must-have in the naturalistic or rock garden. 3-6″ tall, cold-hardy to Zone 3-4.
 Image result for Tulips 'Mixed Peacock' van engelen Tulipa ‘Mixed Peacock’

Zone 3, 6” tall. A bold and beautiful mix of yellow, red, and white ‘Waterlily’ tulips (T. kaufmanniana) and Greigii tulips, both brilliantly showy, hardy, naturalizing wild species. Some of the earliest-blooming ‘botanical’ tulips, they should be planted in full sun, and will thrive in low-water gardens.

 Image result for Tulipa 'The Nightclub' van engelen Tulipa ‘Nightclub’

Zone 3. 16-18” tall. A tall bunch-flowering tulip that produces multiple, deep fuchsia pink flowers on each stem. Blooms in late spring. The strong stems hold up the larger than normal flower heads. Great as a cut flower.

 Image result for Tulip 'Orange Queen' Tulipa ‘Orange Queen’

Zone 3, 22” tall. ‘Orange Queen’ is a Darwin Hybrid developed from a cross between Single Late Tulips and the Early Fosteriana Tulips. Large and bright, they are among the most weather resistant of all garden Tulips with large flower heads on strong stems. Will perform as a perennial for many years if left un-picked and fertilized annually. Full sun to part shade. Blooms in April-May.

https://landscape.devroomen.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/04/visi59247-v.jpg Tulipa ‘Pastel Blend’

Zone 3, 16-24” tall. A 20-bulb, perfectly orchestrated mix of lilac, rose, peachy-pink, creamy-yellow, and white perennializing tulips. Will perform as a perennial for many years if left un-picked and fertilized annually. Full sun to part shade. Blooms mid spring.

Image result for Tulipa 'Queen of Night Tulipa ‘Queen of Night’

Zone 3, 24-32” tall. Queen of Night is considered the blackest tulip ever bred. Its large impressive blooms are velvety dark maroon atop sturdy, long stems which withstand wind and rain. Blooms in late spring. A perfect partner for ‘Shirley’ tulip.

 Image result for Tulipa 'shirley' Tulipa ‘Shirley’
Zone 3, 20” tall. The unique flowers open white with edges speckled and flushed lilac. The lilac shade spreads across the petals as the blooms mature. Blooms mid-late spring. Full sun to part shade. A perfect partner for ‘Queen of Night’ tulip.
 Image result for Tulipa 'Sunrise Perennial Selection' Tulipa ‘Sunrise Blend’
Zone 3, 18-24” tall. This 20-bulb mix of orange, red, yellow, pink and white tulips is bright and cheery. Will perform as perennials for many years if left un-picked and fertilized annually. Full sun to part shade. Blooms mid spring.