Accent your perennial garden with ornamental grasses!

Ornamental Grasses are great companion plants in any garden, including alongside Hibiscus m. ‘Pink Clouds’ (pictured above with lovely Rebecca). Eve has explained, below, the distinguishing features of Cool Season, Warm Season, and Evergreen grasses, and given great descriptions of the most well-known of these grasses.  Come on by to take a look at our selection of ornamental grasses and those established in our display gardens!

If you’ve never tried currants or gooseberries, come sample from our shrubs!  We have a wide array of varieties and this is a great time to decide which flavor is best for your palette.

We are continuing to give away FREE VEGGIE STARTS and ANNUALS!  What?!!  Find out more, below.  (Left: Zeppelin Delicata Squash)

Looking ahead at our classes, Mikl will conduct his ever-popular Pruning for Strength, Health and Beauty class on Sunday, August 5 at 1 PM (and repeated on September 16 at 1 PM).  Give us a quick call at 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!


SUMMER SALES ABOUND!

40% off 2018 seeds!

Free Veggie and Annual Starts with Purchase!

(Limit of 5 per person.)  Our offerings include:
Veggies
Tomatoes
Peppers
Winter Squash
Melons
Basil
Celeriac

Annuals

Nicotiana sylvestris
Petunia exserta
Craspedia
Brachyycome
Datura
Snapdragon Black Prince
Coleus
Lantana
Dreadlocks
Cant Bell
California Poppy
Salvia Fairy Queen
Salvia Blue Bedder
Salvia Blue
Cleome

Get 1 gallon of compost tea for free when you spend over $25!

(Offer good through the end of July.)

TYPES OF ORNAMENTAL GRASSES

There are lots of great reasons to use grasses in your garden or landscape: They are dynamic, moving in the wind and playing with light; they can take the place of a shrub, especially in a narrow planting bed and along pathways. Taller grasses are good for screening in narrow spaces. Grasses enhance any wildlife-oriented, native or naturalistic landscape. Some are suitable in more formal plantings as well. Grasses are great for disguising utility boxes. Deer generally don’t eat them.

Harlequin’s Gardens sells “CLUMP GRASSES” (not spreading or sod-forming) in three categories:

COOL SEASON

Already up and green by March and make active growth in cool weather until it gets hot. They can be kept green through summer by watering, but otherwise they go dormant until the fall, when some of them may begin growing again. Most bloom in June, but a few wait until late summer. Because they begin growing so early in the year, they are subject to being demolished by rabbits. People with resident rabbit populations should choose Warm Season grasses instead. Cut grasses back to 2-3” inches tall before they start their active growth, so light can penetrate the entire clump. Eve does this in February.

WARM SEASON

Most people grow warm season grasses in this area. Many of our native grasses, and many of the most popular grasses for our area are Warm Season grasses. Wait until early April to cut back warm season grasses. Cut as low as you can, ideally 2-3”, so light can penetrate into the entire clump.

EVERGREEN

Remain mostly green through the year. Do not cut back. To clean them up in spring, gently ‘comb’ out old dry blades with a hand rake.


COOL SEASON GRASSES

Karl Foerster’s Feather Reed Grass (Calamagrostis acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’)

The most popular and over-used ornamental grass, for good reason. Medium sized (to 4’ tall), very erect form, easy to grow and highly adaptable to everything but shade, very durable flower/seed heads remain attractive all summer, fall and winter. No fall foliage color. Cut down in early February. Try to avoid plantings that look like rows of soldiers standing at attention! Hardy to Zone 4.  In stock now! 

Korean Feather Reed Grass (Calamagrostis brachytricha)

To 3’ or 4’ tall, with a graceful fountain-like or mounded shape, and waits until the end of the summer to flower. Can take some shade. Very pretty, with pinkish plumes that dry tan. No fall color. Plant Select. Should be used more. Hardy to Zone 4. (Photo credit: Plant Select.)  In stock soon! 

Indian Rice Grass

Up to 2’ tall. Native to Boulder County and much of the interior West. Grows in very dry areas, in full sun. Graceful, open clumps of very narrow blades, and delicately branched flowering stalks in June. Small pearl-like white seeds are held individually on the much-branched stalks and were collected by Native Americans for use as a grain. Also an important food source for wildlife. Old seed germinates better than new seed. Needs supplemental summer watering to keep from going dormant. Excellent meadow grass, perfect in native xeriscapes. Hardy to Zone 3.  In stock now! 

Blue Fescue (Festuca glauca, F. ovina, F. idahoensis)

Evergreen. This year we carry F. glauca ‘Boulder Blue’, a 10”-tall selection with very blue foliage, good form, hardiness, longevity and drought-tolerance. We also have F. glauca “Sea Urchin”, smaller, finer texture, good for rock gardens or Asian-style gardens, and F. glauca. Hardy to Zone 4.  In stock soon! 

Blue Oat (Avena) Grass

Helictotrichon sempervirens. Has some shade tolerance. Hardy to Zone 4.  In stock soon! 

Koeleria macrantha (June Grass)

Has compact seed heads. As its name suggests, June is when it is most beautiful. Good for prairie gardens. Hardy to Zone 3 to 4.  In stock now!

Nasella (Stipa) tenuissima

Mexican Feather Grass. Has very fine-textured blades. Can sometimes be evergreen. This grass is not very long-lived. Most cool season grasses don’t self-sow much, but Nasella does, a lot. Hardy to Zone 5.  In stock now!

We also carry two types of grass-like sedge that are also cool-season:

Carex caryophllea ‘Beatlemania’ (‘Beatlemania’ Variegated Vernal Sedge)

This petite sedge is rhizomatous and spreads. Its long glossy blades are slightly variegated yellow and green, and curve to the ground, giving it a mop-headed look. Makes an excellent groundcover or small ‘lawn’ (just to look at, not to step on) in shady gardens, especially Asian-styled gardens. Almost evergreen. Hardy to Zone 5.   In stock now!

Carex appalachica (Appalachian Sedge)

A small fountain-like clumping sedge, 10”- 2’ tall, very fine-textured, bright light green and very attractive. Native to woods in Eastern N. America, it grows well in dry shade or part shade. It mixes well with perennials and serves as a neat groundcover or edger. Its tenacious roots will prevent erosion on shady slopes, and it can grow amongst tree roots. Blooms in spring, supporting beneficial insects. Hardy to Zone 4.


WARM SEASON GRASSES

Bouteloua gracilis (Blue Grama) and Bouteloua curtipendula (Side-Oats Grama)

are both native and very drought tolerant. There’s a selection of Blue Grama called ‘Blonde Ambition’ (Pictured left. Photo credit: Plant Select) that is taller and has pale tan ‘eyelashes’ rather than the common gray-brown. One can make a drought-tolerant lawn of Blue Grama with some effort (weeding for the first several years) which will be green in summer, brown in winter. Hardy to Zone 3. Blue Grama is our State grass! Side-Oats Grama is a smaller meadow grass. Seed heads and foliage turn a beautiful dark purple-red in fall. Hardy to Zone 3.  In stock now!

Chasmanthium latifolium (Northern Sea Oats, River Oats)

A US native, though not native here, this grass grows well in part shade. the wide, bright green blades emerge from the stems at many heights, giving it a slightly bamboo-like look. The pendulous seed clusters in late summer are composed of very attractive flat, plaited spikelets, starting out pale green, later turning tan. Foliage stays green until fall, when it turns yellow. It will self-sow but is not difficult to control. Hardy to Zone 3.

Muhlenbergia reverchonii ‘Undaunted’ (‘Undaunted’ Ruby Muhly Grass)

A Plant Select winner that is hardy here, but not at higher elevations. It is native to Oklahoma and Texas and is said to grow where there’s water (one common name is ‘Seep Muhly’), yet some horticulturists here recommend growing it pretty dry. When well-grown, it makes a beautiful and graceful 2’ x 3’ mound of fine mid-green blades covered in late summer by a shimmering haze of tiny pink/red flowers, then reddish seeds. Hardy to Zone 5. (Photo credit: Plant Select.)  In stock soon!

Eragrostis trichodes (Sand Love Grass)

This medium-sized grass, to 2-3’ x 2-3’, loves to grow in sandy soil as its name suggests, but adapts to many soils with low to moderate moisture. It self-sows, and is effective in masses. Reddish tones begin to show in late summer, and the haze of tiny purple-pink seeds in July/August are beautiful. Sand Love Grass tends to rot in the center as it gets older, and self-sows readily. Plant in full sun. Hardy to Zone 5.  In stock now!

Andropogon (Schizachyrium) scoparium (Little Bluestem)

Native! Little Bluestem is very erect to 24”-30” with fine foliage and blooms in late summer-early fall. Blooms turn white and catch the late afternoon sun beautifully when back-lit. The foliage turns copper and looks good for a long time. Very drought-tolerant. The Plant Select version is called “Standing Ovation” and has deep red and purple fall color. Selections ‘The Blues’ and ‘Prairie Blues’ have very blue foliage during the growing season. ‘Blaze’ is a colorful selection of the common native in this region. Hardy to Zone 3. (Photo credit: Plant Select.)  In stock now!

Sporobolis airoides (Alkali Sacaton)

is the ‘little brother’ of Giant Sacaton. The foliage mass is about 2’x2’, with the large, pinkish airy bloom/seed plumes rising to 40-48″ tall. For a ‘warm-season’ grass, Alkali Sacaton gets growing quite early in spring, so prune it back in February.  A robust native, Alkali Sacaton flowers for many months, beginning in June. Deep rooted, this grass grows well in all soil types including sand, loam and clay as well as alkaline and salty soils, and prefers moderate to low moisture.  On the prairie Sporobolus is used by animals for forage, cover and nesting. Its seeds are relished by birds. Hardy to Zone 4.  In stock now!

Andropogon gerardii (Big Bluestem)

Native!  Big Bluestem has a wider blade and is somewhat upright but also arching. It also has attractive reddish and purple fall colors. Big Bluestem is one of the dominant components of the Tallgrass Prairies across the Great Plains, where it can reach 8’ in height. Here it can range from 2 to 5’ tall, depending on water and nutrients available. We carry the wild species, and the selection called ‘Pawnee’, which has an upright habit and warm fall colors that persist into winter. This refined big bluestem has the bluish purple stems typical of the genus. In late summer, purplish red flowers appear in groups of three or six, which look like a turkey foot – hence the nickname: “Turkey Foot Grass”. The root system that can extend down more than 10 feet. Each year, a third of these roots die, opening up channels for water. This plant is drought tolerant once it’s established. Attracts birds and butterfly larvae. We also carry the Plant Select ‘Windwalker’ Big Bluestem (Pictured left. Photo credit: Plant Select), which has exceptionally blue foliage color, and is large and upright, with deep red and purple fall color. Plant in Full Sun. Hardy to Zone 4.  In stock now!

Panicum virgatum (Switch Grass)

Native!  Switchgrass was an important component of the Tallgrass Prairie. It tolerates a wide range of soils, including dry ones, but prefers moist soils that are not too rich in nitrogen, and grows best in full sun. Here it grows to about 3’ tall and wide, topped in midsummer by a finely-textured pinkish flower panicles that hover over the foliage like an airy cloud. Seed plumes turn beige and persist well into winter, providing an excellent seed source for birds. Fall foliage color is yellow. Salt-tolerant. “Heavy Metal” variety is more upright and has steely blue foliage. ‘Shenandoah’ is the most popular variety for red foliage accents, with red coloration appearing in summer and increasing in fall. Hardy to Zone 2.  In stock now!

Sorghastrum nutans (Indian Grass)

Native! A tall & narrow grass that is an important part of the tall grass prairie. Here it grows in an upright clump to 6’tall x 3’wide. Indian Grass. Flowering stalks are topped by dense golden flame-shaped inflorescences which mature to brown, bearing numerous nutritious seeds that were used by Native Americans to produce flour. It can grow in a wide range of soils and tolerates drought, cold, salinity and heavy clay, but prefers rich, silty-loams in full sun. Indian grass attracts wildlife; bees come to the blossoms, songbirds eat the seeds, and it provides excellent cover for pheasants, quail, mourning doves and prairie chickens. We sell “Indian Steel” or “Sioux Blue”, both with bluish foliage, and Plant Select’s “Thin Man” (Pictured right. Photo credit: Plant Select), which has distinctly blue foliage and especially narrow habit. Hardy to Zone 4.  In stock now!

Sporobolis heterolepis (Prairie Dropseed)

Native! A lovely small grass found here in the foothills and eastward across the Western prairies. Growing to 1-2’ tall and wide, it makes an elegant, fine-textured, emerald green fountain, suitable in many garden styles. The fine-textured plumes that rise above the foliage clump are attractive in bloom and in seed, and are favored by songbirds. The inflorescences are pleasantly fragrant – some say they smell like burnt buttered popcorn. Plains Indian tribes ground the seeds to make a tasty flour. Prairie Dropseed is also drought tolerant and turns a nice russet brown in fall. Hardy to Zone 4.  In stock soon!

Sporobolis wrightii (Giant Sacaton, Wright’s Sacaton)

Comes up earlier in spring than most other warm season grasses. It also flowers earlier than most other warm-season grasses. This huge S.W. native grass grows to 6-10’ tall and 4-6’ wide, tolerates most soils and is very drought-tolerant. Huge airy flower/seed panicles are ornamental well into winter. Hardy to Zone 5. Cut back to 2-3” in late winter.  (Photo credit: Plant Select.)  In stock now!


FULL LIST OF ORNAMENTAL GRASSES IN STOCK:

Bothriochloa scoparium (Silver Beard Grass)
Achnatherum calamagrostis (Silver Spike Grass)
Schizachyrium scoparium (Little Bluestem)
Eragrostis trichodes (Sand Love Grass)
Nassella tenuissima (Ponytail/Mexican Feather Grass)
Bouteloua gracilis ‘Blonde Ambition’ (Blonde Ambition Grass)
Bouteloua curtipendula (Sideoats Grama Grass)
Sporobolus airoides (Alkali Sacaton)
Calamagrostis acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’ (Karl Foerster Feather Reed Grass)
Panicum virgatum (Switchgrass)
Erianthus ravennae (Plume Grass)
Sorghastrum nutans ‘Thin Man’ (Thin Man Indian Grass)
Sorghastrum nutans (Indian Grass)
Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Hameln’ (Dwarf Fountain Grass)
Sporobolus wrighti (Giant Sacaton)
Andropogon gerardi (Big Bluestem Grass)
Achnatherum robustum (Robust Needlegrass)
Koeleria macrantha (Prairie Junegrass)

ORNAMENTAL GRASSES ARRIVING SOON

Calamagrostis brachytrica (Korean Feather Reed Grass)
Festuca glauca ‘Boulder Blue’ (Boulder Blue Fescue)
Helictotrichon sempervirens (Blue Avina or Blue Oat Grass)
Miscanthus sin. ‘Gracillimus’ (Maiden Grass)
Muhlenbergia rev. (‘Undaunted’ Ruby Muhly)
Panicum virgatum ‘Shenandoah’ (Shenandoah Red Switchgrass)
Schizachyrium scoparium ‘Blaze’ (Blaze Little Bluestem)
Schizachyrium scop.’Prairie Blues’ (Prairie Blues Little Bluestem)
Sporobolus heterolepis (Prairie Dropseed)


PLANTING AND CARE FOR YOUR ORNAMENTAL GRASS

  • Easy to grow, beautiful, versatile, and durable.
  • Use for accents, massing, meadow, groundcover, to provide motion, grace, and great fall and winter interest.
  • Many thrive on little water, many are natives.
  • All are clump-forming, without invasive spreading roots.
  • Plant throughout growing season with adequate water. 
  • Most grasses live longer & sturdier if grown in leaner conditions.
  • Use light applications of organic fertilizer and/or compost or aged manure.
  • We recommend: Richlawn Organic, Yum Yum or Alpha-One fertilizer, Compost, and Dairy Cow Manure.

Upcoming Classes List

We offer empowering classes with great teachers throughout the season.  Coming soon will be more of our class offerings.  Our teachers have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register, and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.  (This list is also available on our website.)

Sun, Aug 5 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 16.)   $15

Sat, Aug 25 from 10 AM to 1 PM – SEVENTH ANNUAL TASTE OF TOMATO

Don’t miss our 8th annual ‘Taste of Tomato’ festival & tasting event along with Boulder County CSU Cooperative Extension!  There are always exciting new varieties to taste and learn about. The location is not yet decided. Check our website for details and entry information.

Sat, Aug 25 at 1 PM – GARDENING WITH MUSHROOMS – THE MAGIC OF MYCELIUM w/ Zach Hedstrom

Join Zach for a class about the many ways you can incorporate mushrooms and fungi in your garden and lifestyle. You will learn the basic techniques for growing mushrooms, how to encourage fungal activity in your soil, and about the health-giving properties that you can experience from eating more mushrooms!   $15

Sun, Aug 26 at 1 PM – LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION with Mikl Brawner

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery.   $15

Sun, Sep 9 at 1 PM – HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions.   $15  (Photo Credit: The Rock Place)

S​at, Sep 15 at 1 PM – FORAGING ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS: REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID with Zach Hedstrom

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. A good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before.   $15

Sun, Sep 16 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug 5.)   $15


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We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!
In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

NATURE’S HUMMINGBIRD FOOD!

​​​

Hummingbirds are abound everywhere!  They are such a delight to have in our gardens, and play an important part in pollinating out plants.  Harlequin’s Gardens carries many hummingbird-friendly plants that are ready to be planted in your garden.  With these plants you won’t need to replenish your hummingbird feeder again!  Read more, below, about specific plants.  (Above: Scrophularia macrantha.  Photo credit: Plant Select.)

If you’ve never tried currants or gooseberries, come sample from our shrubs!  We have a wide array of varieties and this is a great time to decide which flavor is best for your palette.

This week we are giving away FREE VEGGIE STARTS and ANNUALS!  What?!!  Find out more, below.  (Left: Zeppelin Delicata Squash)

Join Mikl on Sunday at 1 PM for his popular “Tips & Tricks of Xericape” class.  He’ll share the secrets that he has gained over the past 30 years on how to garden with less water.  You’ll learn so much!   Give us a quick call at 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat.


SUMMER SALES ABOUND!

40% off 2018 seeds!

Free Veggie and Annual Starts with Purchase!

(Limit of 5 per person.)  Our offerings include:

Veggies

Tomatoes
Peppers
Winter Squash
Melons
Basil
Celeriac

Annuals

Nicotiana sylvestris
Petunia exserta
Craspedia
Brachyycome
Datura
Snapdragon Black Prince
Coleus
Lantana
Dreadlocks
Cant Bell
California Poppy
Salvia Fairy Queen
Salvia Blue Bedder
Salvia Blue
Cleome

Get 1 gallon of compost tea for free when you spend over $25!


GREAT HUMMINGBIRD PLANTS for your garden

Hummingbirds are zipping and humming and sipping around our gardens, partaking of the summer’s bounty of nectar-rich flowers, many of which are ‘color-coded ’specifically to attract them. And you’ll want hummers in your garden, not only because they’re beautiful, not only because some plants depend on them for pollination, not only because migratory birds are imperiled, but also because they eat prodigious numbers of small flying insects like mosquitoes!  And did you know, some hummingbird have been known to live up to 25 years!

Here are some of the plants we sell that attract and support these flying jewels:

Agastache (Hummingbird Mint, Hyssop):
aurantiaca ‘Coronado’, aur. ‘Coronado Red, barberi ‘Tutti Frutti’, cana, cana ‘Sonoran Sunset’, foeniculum, foen. ‘Blue Fortune’, ‘Black Adder’, ‘Blue Boa’, ‘Blue Blazes’, rupestris, rup. ‘Joyful’
Buddleia davidii selections – Butterfly Bush
Campsis radicans – Trumpet Vine
Chilopsis linearis – Desert Willow
Cleome serrulata – Rocky Mt. Bee Plant
Fuchsia
Ipomopsis/Gilia rubra) – Scarlet Gilia
Ipomopsis aggregata – Standing Cypress
Maurandia/Asarina – Climbing Snapdragon
Mina lobata – Spanish Flag Vine
Monarda: many species and cultivars
Monardella macrantha ‘Marian Sampson’
Nepeta sibirica ‘Blue Beauty’ – Siberian Catmint
Penstemon barbatus coccineus – Scarlet Bugler
Penstemon rostriflorus – Bridge’s Beardtongue
Penstemon cardinalis – Cardinal Beardtongue
Penstemon superbus  – Superb Penstemon –
Penstemon pinifolius – Pineleaf Penstemon
Penstemon strictus – Rocky Mt. Penstemon
Penstemon pseudospectabilis – Desert Penstemon
Penstemon virgatus – Wand-bloom Penstemon
Petunia exserta – Brazilian Red Petunia
Salvia x microphylla ‘Windwalker’
Salvia coccinea – Annual Mexican Red Sage
Salvia darcyi – Mexican Red Salvia
Salvia greggii ‘Wild Thing’
Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’
Salvia pachyphylla – Mojave Sage
Scarlet Runner Bean (seeds)
Scutellaria suffrutescens – Cherry Skullcap
Scrophularia macrantha – Red Birds in a Tree
Zauschneria garrettii ‘Orange Carpet’ – Orange Hummingbird Trumpets
Zauschneria arizonica – Arizona Hummingbird Trumpet
Zauschneria latifolia ‘Etteri’  – Etter’s California Fuchsia

We may not have every one of these plants in stock right now, but we have plenty of them! And there’s still time to plant them!


SUMMER BLOOMING SHRUBS & PERENNIALS

We have wonderful summer-blooming shrubs and perennials now ready for planting, like

Allium ‘Millenium’

Perennial plant of the year at Plant Select. Now in bloom!
This butterfly magnet will grace your garden in late summer with masses of rose purple blooms atop neat, shiny, green foliage that remains attractive all season long. The blooms will last up to four weeks on this drought tolerant perennial. Reseeding seems to be much less a problem with ‘Millenium’ than other alliums. Rabbit and deer-resistant. Attracts pollinators. 10-15″ tall. Plant in full sun with low water. Hardy to zone 4.  Available sizes: 2.5″ pots at $4.95, and Quarts at $6.95.

Hibiscus (Rose of Sharron) ‘Hollandia’ and ‘Lucy’

A beautiful, large, upright flowering shrub with dark green leaves and late-blooming flowers in multitude of colors ranging from white to pink to red to lavender. The two varieties we carry both have pink blossoms, and ‘Lucy”s flowers are double. Blooms are two to four inches across followed by a brown capsule fruit 3/4″ long that persists through winter. Prefers moist, well-drained soil. Full sun to part shade. Grows 6-10′ tall by 4-8’ wide. Hardy to zone 5.  Available sizes: 5 Gallon at $57.

Buddleia davidii (Butterfly Bush) ‘Nanho Purple’, ‘Petite Purple’, and ‘Black Knight’

These butterfly bushes feature stunning spikes of various shades of purple fragrant flowers from mid to late summer. Willow-like, leaves on arching stems create an irregular, rounded shrub.  Full sun to filtered shade. Moderate water. Zone 5. Rabbit and deer-resistant.  Available sizes: 1 Gallon at $16, and 2 Gallon at $26.

Caryopteris x clandonensis ‘Dark Knight’ (Blue Mist Spiraea)

Similar to Blue Mist Spiraea, but with darker gray-green foliage and darker blue flowers. Tidy, upright growth habit with soft, fragrant silvery-green foliage and a profusion of deep blue-violet flowers in mid to late summer. A favorite of both butterflies & bees! Superb bee plant that blooms when other plants have finished. Tough, reliable plant. Full sun, very drought tolerant, rabbit and deer-resistant. Zone 4.  Available sizes: 1 Gallon at $16.

Chilopsis linearis (Desert Willow)

A small tree/large shrub native to the southwestern US with willowy foliage joined by large pink/lavender flowers from early summer to first frost which attract hummingbirds. This tough plant performs well in xeriscapes and other dry, unforgiving locations. Tolerates alkaline soils. Deer-resistant. 10-12′ tall by 8-10′ wide. Zone 5.  Available sizes: 2 Gallon at $35.

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Vigorous, tall and super drought-tolerant, Russian Sage is upright and shrubby and thrives in lean, dry soil, full sun, and heat. It should be cut back to about 6″ in spring when new growth begins to appear at the base of the plant.  Tolerant of alkaline soils. The smoky violet-blue flowers are a favorite of bees. Deer and rabbit-resistant. Zone 5.  Available sizes: 1 Gallon at $16.

Seseli gummifera (Moon Carrot)

A spectacular water-wise plant that attracts huge numbers of beneficial insects! The mound of blue-gray, lacy foliage erupts into branched flower stems with a long succession of dense, flat clusters of tiny white flowers emerging from pink buds, mid summer to fall. Usually blooms in its 2nd or 3rd year. Foliage turns pink/purple in fall + winter.  10-15″ tall x 24-36″ wide.  Available sizes: Quarts at $6.95.


WE HAVE RE-STOCKED ON FLAGS AND BBB SEEDS!

Our BBB Seeds rack is full of all your favorite wildflower mixes. Arubymoon’s prayer flags just arrived.

Upcoming Classes List

We offer empowering classes with great teachers throughout the season.  Coming soon will be more of our class offerings.  Our teachers have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register, and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.  (This list is also available on our website.)

Sun, Jul 15 at 1 PM – TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience.   $15

Sun, Aug 5 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 16.)   $15

Sat, Aug 25 from 10 AM to 1 PM – SEVENTH ANNUAL TASTE OF TOMATO

Don’t miss our 8th annual ‘Taste of Tomato’ festival & tasting event along with Boulder County CSU Cooperative Extension!  There are always exciting new varieties to taste and learn about. The location is not yet decided. Check our website for details and entry information.

Sat, Aug 25 at 1 PM – GARDENING WITH MUSHROOMS – THE MAGIC OF MYCELIUM w/ Zach Hedstrom

Join Zach for a class about the many ways you can incorporate mushrooms and fungi in your garden and lifestyle. You will learn the basic techniques for growing mushrooms, how to encourage fungal activity in your soil, and about the health-giving properties that you can experience from eating more mushrooms!   $15

Sun, Aug 26 at 1 PM – LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION with Mikl Brawner

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery.   $15

Sun, Sep 9 at 1 PM – HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions.   $15  (Photo Credit: The Rock Place)

S​at, Sep 15 at 1 PM – FORAGING ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS: REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID with Zach Hedstrom

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. A good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before.   $15

Sun, Sep 16 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug 5.)   $15

Celebrate Your Independence with Beautiful Color!

CELEBRATE YOUR INDEPENDENCE  
​​​

WITH BEAUTIFUL COLOR!


We are CLOSED TOMORROW, on Independence Day!

In a long standing tradition, Harlequin’s Gardens celebrates Independence Day by taking the day off and being

closed on Wednesday, July 4.

We look forward to seeing you today, 9-5, and beginning again on Thursday when we’re open 9-6.


SOME CURRENT FLOWERING BEAUTIES

PICTURED BLOOMING PLANTS:
Top Row: Clematis ‘Ville de Lyon’
Second Row: Delphinium elatum ‘Magic Fountains’, Kniphofia uvaria ‘Flamenco’, Digitalis grandiflora, Yellow Foxglove
Third Row: Campanula poscharskyana, Siberian Bellflower

OUR GLOVE RACK IS OVERFLOWING!

We’ve completely restocked our glove rack in all styles, colors, and sizes (especially small sizes) Come in and see which ones are a match for you!


PLANT ANCHORS

If you’re struggling to find a way to create a support for your vine, your outdoor mist system, or holiday lights, check-out our Plant Anchor System.  It works on masonry, wood, stucco, glass, plastic, steel and concrete – without nails, or screws!  It’s pretty amazing!

ANNUALS ON SALE!

We have some great annuals in stock, many of which are on sale at $1.50 each – wow!

Come in and see our selection!


WHAT’S BLOOMING IN JULY?

Many gardeners think of Spring as the height of the ornamental gardening season. Sure, so many of our best-known flowering plants – Tulip, Crocus, Daffodil, Primrose, Peony, Lilac, Forsythia, Oriental Poppy, Basket of Gold, Bearded Iris, are at their showiest in spring. But as we pass to the other side of the Summer Solstice, a whole new palette of blooms arises, including many Natives, lots of Prairie-dwellers and Steppe plants, and hardy plants from South of the Border, bringing bold color and attracting more and different beneficial insects and pollinators to the garden.
Here is the beginning of our list of July beautiesFor the full list of those July flowers to inspire you, Click here, or visit the nursery for the list! 

  • Acanthus balcanicus (Bear’s Breech)
  • Achillea (Yarrow)
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Agastache aurantiaca ‘Coronado’
  • Agastache aurantiaca ‘Coronado Red’
  • Agastache ‘Blue Boa’
  • Agastache foeniculum (Anise Hyssop)
  • Alcea (Hollyhock)
  • Allium caeruleum/azureum
  • Allium flavum
  • Allium senescens  (Pictured right)

Upcoming Classes List

We offer empowering classes with great teachers throughout the season.  Coming soon will be more of our class offerings.  Our teachers have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register, and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.  (This list is also available on our website.)

Sun, Jul 15 at 1 PM – TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience.   $15

Sat, Jul 21 at 1 PM – BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN with Elaine Walker

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces.   $15

Sun, Aug 5 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 16.)   $15

Sat, Aug 25 from 10 AM to 1 PM – SEVENTH ANNUAL TASTE OF TOMATO

Don’t miss our 8th annual ‘Taste of Tomato’ festival & tasting event along with Boulder County CSU Cooperative Extension!  There are always exciting new varieties to taste and learn about. The location is not yet decided. Check our website for details and entry information.

Sat, Aug 25 at 1 PM – GARDENING WITH MUSHROOMS – THE MAGIC OF MYCELIUM w/ Zach Hedstrom

Join Zach for a class about the many ways you can incorporate mushrooms and fungi in your garden and lifestyle. You will learn the basic techniques for growing mushrooms, how to encourage fungal activity in your soil, and about the health-giving properties that you can experience from eating more mushrooms!   $15

Sun, Aug 26 at 1 PM – LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION with Mikl Brawner

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery.   $15

Sun, Sep 9 at 1 PM – HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions.   $15  (Photo Credit: The Rock Place)

S​at, Sep 15 at 1 PM – FORAGING ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS: REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID with Zach Hedstrom

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. A good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before.   $15

Sun, Sep 16 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug 5.)   $15


Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe.

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos!

We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!
In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

Pest control, flowering beauties

PEST CONTROL, 
​​​

SALES, and JULY BLOOMS!!

PEST CONTROL

This is the season for pest problems (diseases, insects, fungus) and here at Harlequin’s Gardens we have products that have been proven successful for combating them in effective and environmentally safe ways!  Below are some of our favorite pest control products; come on in to see our full range of products, some of which are on sale at 50% off through Sunday, July 1! 

While you’re here, please utilize our reference library and knowledgeable staff to help with your plant and pest identification needs.    
  • When bringing a plant identification sample, please bring a sizable sample including numerous leaves, flowers, buds, etc.
  • When bringing a pest sample, again bring in a sizable plant sample and several bugs, eggs, etc.
  • We request that you bring all samples in clear plastic bags to avoid contamination of our plant stock.  Thank you!

NEEM OIL from INDIA

Pure, cold press with active ingredient Azadirachtin, which is approved by the EPA.  Neem controls, stops feeding of and/or repels Aphids, Leafhoppers, Scale, Leafminers, Beetles, Spider Mites, Mealy Bugs, Thrips, Caterpillars, Weevils, Whitefly, Grasshoppers and fungal disease like Powdery Mildew.  It is not harmful to humans, animals, beneficial insects or the environment (not good over water with fish). 

Neem must be sprayed directly on pests to be effective for killing; it prevents molting and stops feeding, and works as a repellent. Spray in the early morning or evening.  Neem oil solidifies at 50˚, so thaw it in a warm water bath before mixing.  Then, mix it with one quart of warm water and ¼ teaspoon of mild dish soap, and shake occasionally to emulsify.  For very tough pests try 2 teaspoons per quart with ½ teaspoon soap (test on small area first).  Neem requires some care to use but is safe and very useful.

GREEN CURE

Organic protection & correction of fungus diseases. It has been tested commercially for over 9 years. This alternative to toxic fungicides has proved effective against powdery mildew, blackspot, rust & others. This product is perfectly safe for use on vegetables.  Local rosarians swear by it!  

VEGGIE PHARM

Amazingly effective not only for aphids and mites, but even for blister beetles and potato beetles, that devour clematis, mirabilis, and anemome!  Veggie Pharm also acts as a repellent for insects and small animals.

JAPANESE BEETLE BAIT

Sadly Japanese Beetles have become an annual problem in Boulder and neighboring counties. We are now carrying Safer® Brand Replacement Bait to help you with the Japanese Beetle Battle.  This product uses a food and sex attractant to lure insects into the trap and disrupt the mating cycle of destructive Japanese Beetles. There are no sprays and has no mess, and under ordinary weather conditions, this bait should last about 12 weeks.

Trap Placement, Application Rate and Use:

  • Place traps as beetles emerge (late June in Colorado)
  • Place traps on the generally upwind side of vegetable gardens, flower gardens, ornamental shrub planting and other outside landscape planting attached by the beetles. Apply traps at the rate of one trap per 50 linear feet along two sides of plant perimeters. For example, if the site is 1-50 linear feet, place only one trap on each of the two sides. If the site is 51-100 linear feet, place two traps on each of the two sides, etc. Do not enclose the treated site with traps.
  • Place traps in sunny areas 3 to 5 feet above the ground.
  • Place traps at least 10 feet away from the planting as they may attract beetles to foliage if placed closer
  • Replace traps when full. If trap catches decline and beetles are still present, replace bait pack. Remove traps from site when beetles are no longer present.

FIREBLIGHT

Mikl recently wrote an excellent article detailing fireblight causes and the best ways to treat your affected plants.  Click here to read more!


SPECIAL PLANTS ON SALE through SUNDAY, JULY 1!

These beautiful, useful and successful plants, including 2-gallon roses and shrubs are on sale through the weekend!!  And find Surprise sale items while you’re here.

SHRUBS & TREES

Acer tataricum (Tatarian Maple), 2-gallon at $30 (regularly at $36)

Has those pretty red winged seed pods, like ‘Hot Wings’. 15′ tall, alkaline and drought-tolerant.  (Pictured left.)

Cercocarpus ledifolius, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly $26)

Large broadleafed evergreen shrub/small tree (12-20’ x 9-12’) native to the Southwest and Western foothills. Upright growth habit and small lance-shaped, dark green, leathery leaves with edges that curl under. White, fuzzy, curled “seed tails” in fall are both attractive and unusual. Grows well in full sun in low fertility, well-drained soil. Zone 4. Low water. Deer resistant.

Cercocarpus montanus, 2-gallon at $16 (regularly $26)

Native shrub (6-9’ x 3-6’) with dark gray-green, deeply veined leaves. Inconspicuous flowers produce fuzzy, twisted “seed tails” in fall, providing interest through the winter. This xeric plant grows here in our foothills, and thrives in full sun and well-drained soil. Zone 2.

Cotoneaster multiflora, 2-gallon at $16 (regularly $26)

Little known and underused cotoneaster (pronounced: co-tow-nee-aster),  with small white flowers in spring that mature to bright red fruit in fall. A large shrub (8-10’ x 10-12’) with graceful arching branches. Native to China. Zone 4. Plant in full sun with low-moderate water.

Golden Rain Tree, 2-gallon at $30 (regularly $35)

Drought-tolerant, 35′ tall, ornamental tree with clusters of yellow flowers in the summer followed by Chinese lantern-like pods.

Ligustrum vulgare ​Cheyenne Privet, 2-gallon at $16 (regularly $26), #5 at $29 (regularly $39)

An upright, rapid grower with dark green foliage and fragrant clusters of small white flowers in early summer. Takes shearing well which makes this an excellent, reliable shrub for screens and hedges. Grows to 9-12’ x 3-6’ Plant in full sun to part shade with low-moderate water. Zone 3.  (Pictured right.)

Lodense Privet, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly $26)

Very compact, dense, upright slow-growing shrub with glossy green foliage that holds on late into the season. Loose clusters of white flowers in early summer produce shiny black (possibly poisonous) fruit. Excellent as a low hedge. No significant fall color (yellow). Some potential for stem dieback during severe winters. Full sun to part shade. Zone 4.

Goldflame Spirea, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly $26)

The spring foliage of this 2-3′ x 2-3′ shrub is bright gold with red tips, turning gold-green in summer. Coppery-orange fall color. Dark pink flower clusters in summer. Terrific accent or border plant with many accenting color changes throughout the season. Zone 4.

Purple Lilac, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly $26)

Stout branches form an upright, vase-shaped shrub (10-12′ x 10-12′) producing fragrant purple flowers in large, pyramidal clusters in mid-spring. Leaves are thick and heart-shaped, with a lustrous blue-green color. Tolerant of alkaline soil and drought conditions. Zone 2.  (Pictured left.)

Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Nana’ (Dwarf Ninebark), 2-gallon at $20 (regularly $26)

Attractive plant with small green leaves on a dense, (4-6′ x 4-6′) bushy form. White flowers in May to June are followed by reddish seed heads. Useful as a hedge plant. Zone 2.

Siberian Pea Shrub, 2-gallon at $22 (regularly at $27)

An adaptable, tough, super-hardy shrub that resists deer, withstands heat and cold, sun or part shade, moderate or low water. Makes an excellent screen or hedge. The stems are an attractive bright green and have some spines, and foliage is finely textured. Pea-like yellow flowers in spring are followed by red-brown pods that make nutritious food for chickens. 10-15′ tall, zone 2.

Euonymus fortunei Minima, 1-gallon at $5 (regularly at $17)

Evergreen vine to 10′. Small leaves, drought-tolerant, and tough.

Crataegus ambigua (Russian Hawthorn), 3-gallon at $40 (regularly at $48)

A small, attractive, broad-headed tree with medium green, deeply lobed foliage. Masses of white flowers appear in late May, becoming abundant 1/2″ brilliant red fruits in mid- to late summer. Can be single or multi-trunked. Full sun. Drought-resistant. 15′ x 15′, zone 3.  (Pictured right.)

Hardy Boxwoods ‘Julia Jane’ and ‘Saskatoon’, 1-gallon at $15 (regularly at $20)

3’x3′ compact evergreen shrubs for shade. Low-water, deer-resistant.

ROSES

2-gallon Roses in the Sale area are $20 (regularly $26) unless otherwise marked.

Darlow’s Enigma Shrub rose, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly at $26)

This 8-10′ x 6′ rose produces large quantities of small, white, very fragrant single blooms. Good repeat. (Pictured left.)

Baltimore Belle Climbing Rose, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly at $26)

10′ climber with double, light-pink to white, sweetly fragrant flowers in the spring. Vigorous and tough.

Martin’s Pink Climbing Rose, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly at $26)

The beautiful, soft pink, double flowers are fragrant. A vigorous, 10′ rambler. Spring-blooming.

The Gift Shrub rose, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly at $26)

3′ x 4′, clouds of small white flowers. Profuse-blooming. Tough as nails!

FREE package of mycorrhizae with every purchase over $50!


We are Closed on Independence Day!

In a long standing tradition, Harlequin’s Gardens celebrates Independence Day by taking the day off and being

closed on Wednesday, July 4.



OUR GLOVE RACK IS FULL!

We’ve completely restocked our glove rack in all styles, colors, and sizes (especially small sizes) Come in and see which ones are a match for you!


PLANT ANCHORS

If you’re struggling to find a way to create a support for your vine, your outdoor mist system, or holiday lights, check-out our Plant Anchor System.  It works on masonry, wood, stucco, glass, plastic, steel and concrete – without nails, or screws!  It’s pretty amazing!

ANNUALS ON SALE!

We have some great annuals in stock, many of which are on sale at $1.50 each – wow!

Come in and see our selection!


WHAT’S BLOOMING IN JULY?

Many gardeners think of Spring as the height of the ornamental gardening season. Sure, so many of our best-known flowering plants – Tulip, Crocus, Daffodil, Primrose, Peony, Lilac, Forsythia, Oriental Poppy, Basket of Gold, Bearded Iris, are at their showiest in spring. But as we pass to the other side of the Summer Solstice, a whole new palette of blooms arises, including many Natives, lots of Prairie-dwellers and Steppe plants, and hardy plants from South of the Border, bringing bold color and attracting more and different beneficial insects and pollinators to the garden.
Here is the beginning of our list of July beautiesFor the full list of those July flowers to inspire you, Click here, or visit the nursery for the list! 
  • Acanthus balcanicus (Bear’s Breech)
  • Achillea (Yarrow)
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Agastache aurantiaca ‘Coronado’
  • Agastache aurantiaca ‘Coronado Red’
  • Agastache ‘Blue Boa’
  • Agastache foeniculum (Anise Hyssop)
  • Alcea (Hollyhock)
  • Allium caeruleum/azureum
  • Allium flavum
  • Allium senescens  (Pictured right)

Pictured below are some of our current flowering beauties.​


PICTURED BLOOMING PLANTS:

Top Row: Oenothera macro. ‘ Silver Blade’, Clematis ‘Warsaw Nike’, Rosa Pink Drift
Second Row: Acantholimon hohenackeri, Rosa Morden Sunrise, Berlandiera lyrata – Chocolate Flower
Third Row: Penstemon virgatus – Wand bloom Penstemon, Sedum ‘Blue Spruce’, Phlomis cachmeriana
Fourth Row: Rosa ‘Abraham Darby’, Corydalis lutea, Lilium regale – Regal Lily

Upcoming Classes List

We offer empowering classes with great teachers throughout the season.  Coming soon will be more of our class offerings.  Our teachers have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register, and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.  (This list is also available on our website.)

Sun, Jul 15 at 1 PM – TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience.   $15

Sat, Jul 21 at 1 PM – BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN with Elaine Walker

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces.   $15

Sun, Aug 5 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 16.)   $15

Sat, Aug 25 from 10 AM to 1 PM – SEVENTH ANNUAL TASTE OF TOMATO

Don’t miss our 8th annual ‘Taste of Tomato’ festival & tasting event along with Boulder County CSU Cooperative Extension!  There are always exciting new varieties to taste and learn about. The location is not yet decided. Check our website for details and entry information.

Sat, Aug 25 at 1 PM – GARDENING WITH MUSHROOMS – THE MAGIC OF MYCELIUM w/ Zach Hedstrom

Join Zach for a class about the many ways you can incorporate mushrooms and fungi in your garden and lifestyle. You will learn the basic techniques for growing mushrooms, how to encourage fungal activity in your soil, and about the health-giving properties that you can experience from eating more mushrooms!   $15

Sun, Aug 26 at 1 PM – LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION with Mikl Brawner

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery.   $15

Sun, Sep 9 at 1 PM – HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions.   $15  (Photo Credit: The Rock Place)

S​at, Sep 15 at 1 PM – FORAGING ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS: REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID with Zach Hedstrom

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. A good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before.   $15

Sun, Sep 16 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug 5.)   $15


Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe.

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos!

We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!
In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

Pollinator Month and Two Special Sales

POLLINATOR MONTH and TWO SPECIAL SALES !!

Pollinator Month

The month of June is Pollinator Month in Boulder, and June 18-24 is National Pollinator Week.  Harlequin’s Gardens is here to help you celebrate in a variety of ways!

PLANTS

The best way to support pollinators is to provide safe forage and habitat.  
First, our plants are all neonicotinoid-free. Neonicotinoids are systemic insecticides that circulate through the entire plant, including nectar and pollen, which are collected by bees for food.  Bees, with their fuzzy bodies and need for pollen for their baby-food are the best pollinators.

Second, our plants are adapted to our local environment. This means that they’re ‘happier’ here and require less chemical and water input.  We carry many plants from ground covers to trees, among them Nepeta (catmint) and Helianthus (sunflower), that will provide for pollinators in general, as well as some plants visited by bee specialists, for example Sphaeralcea ( mallow) and Oenothera (evening primrose) (Pictured left).  Even our own-root roses, selected for our climate and soils, are good for pollinators.  As a rule of thumb, if you can see the stamens, so can the bees.

Ask for our pollinator plant lists to help you shop, or prepare in advance by visiting our website “Plants for Bees and other Pollinators” and “Plants for Pollinators List”.

PICTURED POLLINATOR PLANTS:

Top Row: Tiger Swallowtail on Larkspur,  Seseli gummiferum (Moon Carrot), Native bee on Showy Milkweed
Second Row: Genista lydia (Dwarf Golden Broom), Allium ‘Millenium’, Achillea (Yarrow)
Third Row: Origanum ‘Kent’s Beauty, Native bee on native Gaillardia, Gallardia aristata
Fourth Row: Asclepias curassavica (Milkweed), Sambucus nigra (Elderberry), Dictamnus albus (Gas Plant)

WEEKEND CLASSES

We’ll feature pollinators in our classes too where you can learn how to support the important role of bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles in pollinating our lovely flowers, native plants, fruits, and veggies.

SATURDAY

Saturday morning at 10 AM, our own Queen Bee, Kristina Williams, orchestrates a Honey Bee Meet and Greet where you can see the inside of a working honey bee hive!  (Long pants and sleeves recommended.)
This is followed at 1 PM by our (Free!) and very special Habitat Hero Wildscaping 101 class.  Here Laura Somers helps you to view gardens as a bird does when seeking shelter, food and nesting opportunities.  A wealth of knowledge for a fantastic price!

SUNDAY

Kristina returns on Sunday morning at 10 AM to share info on our most important, and perhaps underrated, pollinators: Colorado Native Bees.  She will tell you about our local species, where and how they nest, and their integral role in our ecosystem.  (Photo left: Native bee on Phacelia tanacetifolia.)
Then at 1 PM, Mikl teaches us how to Manage Garden Pests Without Using Poisons – increasingly important techniques in our evolving world. Mikl has over 30 years of non-toxic gardening experience and wisdom to share!

We’re so proud to be offering these important classes and hope to see you there this weekend!  As always, pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403. 

SUPPLIES

This year our Bee Barn offers supplies for cultivating some of the Front Range’s  500+ species of native bees as well as the better known European honey bee.
This is the month to start making serious plans for the health of your honey bees.  Varroa mite levels will climb steeply in July, but we have the tools to monitor them and ways to knock them down before they knock your bees down. European Foulbrood has been rearing its ugly head too.  We carry easy-to-use diagnostic kits to determine whether your bees have it and will need to be seen by a vet.

NATIVE BEES

Honey bees aren’t practical for everyone, but our native, mostly solitary bees did ALL of the bee-pollinating in the Americas before the introduction of honey bees from Europe in the 1600s.  They love our weather, soils and native plants. And we love them! This year we’re excited to add a selection of products to help you culture some of these gentle hole nesting bees where you live, including mason bees and leafcutter bees.  Did you know that re-using old nesting tubes or blocks drilled with holes can promote diseases and parasites? We’ve partnered with Crown Bees to bring you responsible, sustainable, clean culture methods, based on the needs of the bees.

Here’s a sample of the items we’re offering at a special 20% discount during Pollinator Week, June 18-24!!

Native Bee Chalet

For placing nesting tubes for the current season and an attic for placing the previous season’s bees to emerge in the current season.

Reusable cardboard mason bee tubes with disposable paper liners

For those interested in spring mason bees in particular. Pollinator Pack: Tubes in an assortment of sizes and materials provide nesting holes for a variety of our native bees.

Native Bee Guide Booklet

A brief introduction to just some of the bee species that may nest in your native bee house.

The Mason Bee Revolution book

For those who are seriously into mason bees, early season pollinators.

For more information about Pollinator Partnership, visit their website where you’ll also find additional Programs, Resources and Events.

AFTER the RAIN SALE!   PLANT NOW and SAVE!

Come in Friday, June 22 through Thursday, June 28 for these beautiful, useful and successful plants, including 2-gallon roses and shrubs!!  And find Surprise sale items while you’re here.

Cercocarpus ledifolius, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly $26)
Large broadleafed evergreen shrub/small tree (12-20’ x 9-12’) native to the Southwest and Western foothills. Upright growth habit and small lance-shaped, dark green, leathery leaves with edges that curl under. White, fuzzy, curled “seed tails” in fall are both attractive and unusual. Grows well in full sun in low fertility, well-drained soil. Zone 4. Low water. Deer resistant.

Cercocarpus montanus, 2-gallon at $16 (regularly $26)
Native shrub (6-9’ x 3-6’) with dark gray-green, deeply veined leaves. Inconspicuous flowers produce fuzzy, twisted “seed tails” in fall, providing interest through the winter. This xeric plant grows here in our foothills, and thrives in full sun and well-drained soil. Zone 2.

Cotoneaster multiflora, 2-gallon at $16 (regularly $26)
Little known and underused cotoneaster (pronounced: co-tow-nee-aster),  with small white flowers in spring that mature to bright red fruit in fall. A large shrub (8-10’ x 10-12’) with graceful arching branches. Native to China. Zone 4. Plant in full sun with low-moderate water.

Ligustrum vulgare ​Cheyenne Privet, 2-gallon at $16 (regularly $26), #5 at $29 (regularly $39)
An upright, rapid grower with dark green foliage and fragrant clusters of small white flowers in early summer. Takes shearing well which makes this an excellent, reliable shrub for screens and hedges. Grows to 9-12’ x 3-6’ Plant in full sun to part shade with low-moderate water. Zone 3
Lodense Privet, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly $26)
Very compact, dense, upright slow-growing shrub with glossy green foliage that holds on late into the season. Loose clusters of white flowers in early summer produce shiny black (possibly poisonous) fruit. Excellent as a low hedge. No significant fall color (yellow). Some potential for stem dieback during severe winters. Full sun to part shade. Zone 4.
Purple Lilac, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly $26)
Stout branches form an upright, vase-shaped shrub (10-12′ x 10-12′) producing fragrant purple flowers in large, pyramidal clusters in mid-spring. Leaves are thick and heart-shaped, with a lustrous blue-green color. Tolerant of alkaline soil and drought conditions. Zone 2.
Goldflame Spirea, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly $26)
The spring foliage of this 2-3′ x 2-3′ shrub is bright gold with red tips, turning gold-green in summer. Coppery-orange fall color. Dark pink flower clusters in summer. Terrific accent or border plant with many accenting color changes throughout the season. Zone 4.
Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Nana’ (Dwarf Ninebark), 2-gallon at $20 (regularly $26)
Attractive plant with small green leaves on a dense, (4-6′ x 4-6′) bushy form. White flowers in May to June are followed by reddish seed heads. Useful as a hedge plant. Zone 2.
Golden Rain Tree, 2-gallon at $30 (regularly $35)
Drought-tolerant, 35′ tall, ornamental tree with clusters of yellow flowers in the summer followed by Chinese lantern-like pods.
Siberian Pea Shrub, 2-gallon at $22 (regularly at $27)
An adaptable, tough, super-hardy shrub that resists deer, withstands heat and cold, sun or part shade, moderate or low water. Makes an excellent screen or hedge. The stems are an attractive bright green and have some spines, and foliage is finely textured. Pea-like yellow flowers in spring are followed by red-brown pods that make nutritious food for chickens. 10-15′ tall, zone 2.
Acer tataricum (Tatarian Maple), 2-gallon at $30 (regularly at $36)
Has those pretty red winged seed pods, like ‘Hot Wings’. 15′ tall, alkaline and drought-tolerant.
Crataegus ambigua (Russian Hawthorn), 3-gallon at $40 (regularly at $48)
A small, attractive, broad-headed tree with medium green, deeply lobed foliage. Masses of white flowers appear in late May, becoming abundant 1/2″ brilliant red fruits in mid- to late summer. Can be single or multi-trunked. Full sun. Drought-resistant. 15′ x 15′, zone 3.
Euonymus fortunei Minima, 1-gallon at $5 (regularly at $17)
Evergreen vine to 10′. Small leaves, drought-tolerant, and tough.
Hardy Boxwoods ‘Julia Jane’ and ‘Saskatoon’, 1-gallon at $15 (regularly at $20)
3’x3′ compact evergreen shrubs for shade. Low-water, deer-resistant.
Roses:
2-gallon Roses in the Sale area are $20
(regularly $26) unless otherwise marked.
Baltimore Belle Climbing Rose, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly at $26)
10′ climber with double, light-pink to white, sweetly fragrant flowers in the spring. Vigorous and tough.
Martin’s Pink Climbing Rose, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly at $26)
The beautiful, soft pink, double flowers are fragrant. A vigorous, 10′ rambler. Spring-blooming.
Darlow’s Enigma Shrub rose, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly at $26)
This 8-10′ x 6′ rose produces large quantities of small, white, very fragrant single blooms. Good repeat.
The Gift Shrub rose, 2-gallon at $20 (regularly at $26)
3′ x 4′, clouds of small white flowers. Profuse-blooming. Tough as nails!

FREE package of mycorrhizae with every purchase over $50!


Classes List

We offer empowering classes with great teachers throughout the season.  Coming soon will be more of our class offerings.  Our teachers have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register, and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.  (This list is also available on our website.)

Sat, Jun 23 at 10 AM – HONEY BEE MEET & GREET with Kristina Williams

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knot hole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside?  Come take a peek inside a working hive of honey bees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general.   Please wear long sleeves and pants.   $15

Sat, Jun 23 1 – 2 PM – HABITAT HERO – WILDSCAPING 101 (Free!) with Laura Somers

Laura Somers, Wildscape Ambassador, representing Audubon Rockies and Colorado Native Plant Society will demonstrate the importance of restoring our communities, one garden patch at a time. From a birds-eye view, learn how to create wildlife-friendly gardens that help combat the loss of open spaces and create green corridors that link your wildscape to larger natural areas by providing habitat for wildlife.   (Free!)

Sun, Jun 24 at 10 AM – COLORADO NATIVE BEES with Kristina Williams

If you have a backyard garden, it’s probably being pollinated by some of Boulder County’s 500+ species of native bees.  We’ll talk about some of the basic types and how you can create bee friendly habitat to invite them to your yard.  Then we’ll walk through Harlequins’ demonstration gardens to observe some of these bees in action.   $15

Sun, Jun 24 at 1 PM – MANAGING GARDEN PESTS WITHOUT POISONS with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to look for and identify common pests, and how to judge if anything needs to be done. Learn which organic solutions are the most effective, for what, and how to do it. Mikl has been walking this talk for 35 years.    $15


Future Classes:

Sun, Jul 15 at 1 PM – TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience.   $15

Sat, Jul 21 at 1 PM – BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN with Elaine Walker

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces.   $15

Sun, Aug 5 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 16.)   $15

Sat, Aug 25 from 10 AM to 1 PM – SEVENTH ANNUAL TASTE OF TOMATO

Don’t miss our 8th annual ‘Taste of Tomato’ festival & tasting event along with Boulder County CSU Cooperative Extension!  There are always exciting new varieties to taste and learn about. The location is not yet decided. Check our website for details and entry information.

Sat, Aug 25 at 1 PM – GARDENING WITH MUSHROOMS – THE MAGIC OF MYCELIUM w/ Zach Hedstrom

Join Zach for a class about the many ways you can incorporate mushrooms and fungi in your garden and lifestyle. You will learn the basic techniques for growing mushrooms, how to encourage fungal activity in your soil, and about the health-giving properties that you can experience from eating more mushrooms!   $15

Sun, Aug 26 at 1 PM – LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION with Mikl Brawner

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery.   $15

Sun, Sep 9 at 1 PM – HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions.   $15  (Photo Credit: The Rock Place)

S​at, Sep 15 at 1 PM – FORAGING ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS: REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID with Zach Hedstrom

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. A good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before.   $15

Sun, Sep 16 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug 5.)   $15


Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe.

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos!

We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!
In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

Peak Roses, Fireblight

Peak Roses!

We have so much great information to share with you this week!  From Eve and Mikl’s (photo worthy!) visit to the Dushanbe Teahouse, special rose profiles, and an informative article on fireblight from Mikl.
Before that, we’ll remind you of our three spectacular classes this weekend.  Saturday at 10 AM, Alison Peck talks about landscapes patterned after nature in “Gardening Advice from Mother Nature”.  This is followed at 1 PM with a ​not-to-be-missed “Natives for Every Garden” by Dan Johnson, Denver Botanical Garden’s Curator of Native Plants!  Dan will share his immense knowledge on water-thrifty plants that attract pollinators, create wildlife habitat, and provide changing year ‘round color – wow!  Then on Sunday at 1 PM, Mikl shares his Composting Success tips.  Join us for one, or all three classes!
Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended with a quick call to 303-939-9403. To see the full descriptions of these classes and many more, just scroll down.


PEAK ROSES!

Eve and Mikl visited the Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse Friday evening, and found the rose garden there in absolutely glorious, fragrant, breathtaking full bloom! If you haven’t been there recently, we really encourage you to make it a priority.

The Teahouse garden has never been better, and this is it’s 20th year! Eve and Mikl designed the rose garden, which was installed in May, 1998. From the beginning, it has been a demonstration garden of hardy, own-root (not grafted) roses for the Boulder Valley Rose Society, who care for the garden, using NO pesticides, NO chemicals, EVER! That’s 20 years of beautiful, thriving, fragrant roses of many different types and more than 30 varieties.

Harlequin’s Gardens sells many of these varieties, and with a lot of our potted rose plants in bloom, this is an excellent time to come and choose from our large and wide-ranging selection, from romantic heirloom antiques to super-hardy Canadian-bred varieties, to continual-blooming ‘patio’ roses for smaller gardens.

Here’s an introduction to just a few of the wonderful roses at the Teahouse:

Golden Wings:

Shrub Rose to 5-6’ high & wide, introduced 1956, Cold-hardy to Zone 5
Probably the most asked-about rose at the Teahouse! The center of each large light-yellow bloom is graced with a prominent, lush ring of long, curved deep-red stamens, giving it an unmatched natural elegance. They also possess a wonderful, spicy and sweet fragrance! Golden Wings blooms repeatedly from June until hard frost, and the blooms are followed by a glorious crop of large golden hips in autumn. A versatile rose, it looks appropriate in almost any style of garden.

Stanwell Perpetual:

Unique Heirloom Shrub Rose to 4-5’ high and wide, Cold-hardy to Zone 4
A five-star rose with wonderful old-rose fragrance, covered with lovely 3” wide blush-pink blooms of old-fashioned double form, and lots of unusual gray-green foliage on a gracefully arching shrub. Stanwell Perpetual begins blooming in late May, and barely takes a break until late fall. It blooms through the heat of July, when most other roses are taking a break. Introduced in 1838, Stanwell is thought to be the result of a cross between the once-blooming Rosa spinosissima (Scotsbriar), with it’s finely pinnate gray-green leaves and spiny red canes, and repeat-blooming Autumn Damask. Hardy, adaptable and disease-free!

Robusta:

Hybrid Robusta Large Shrub/Climber, 4-8’h x 6’w, Cold-hardy to Zone 5
Robusta is a rose you simply cannot ignore. It grabs your attention even from a distance, with its profusion of 4”-wide lipstick-red single to semi-double flowers in large clusters almost continuously through the season! This upright shrub develops thick canes, clothed in beautiful, large, glossy bright green leaves and undeniably fierce prickles. The blooms are lightly fragrant. Use Robusta for a focal point, a fence, hedge or impenetrable barrier. No other hardy rose offers this kind of red impact for so long! Robusta was introduced in 1979 by Kordes Roses in Germany.

JoAn’s Pink Perpetual

Found Heirloom Shrub Rose, probable Hyb. Perpetual, 4-6’h x 2-4’w, Cold-hardy to Zone 4
One of the mystery roses from the historical Fairmount Cemetery in Denver. Deep, rosy pink blooms are large, very full and deliciously fragrant on a sturdy, healthy and hardy shrub. Heavy spring bloom is followed by some repeat through the summer. The study name “JoAn’s Pink Perpetual” is dedicated to the proactive efforts to protect Fairmount Cemetery’s roses by former publicity director JoAn Cullen.  (Image from High Country Garden.)

John Davis

Canadian-bred Shrub/short Climber, to 5’high and wide (7-8’h x 3’w as climber), Cold-hardy to Zone3
This double, pink rose looks so charming and old-fashioned, it’s hard to imagine just how tough it really is. But we’ve not only had John Davis climbing happily at the Teahouse for 20 years, but he’s also been thriving as a shrub on the sun-and-wind-battered west side of the blue house at Harlequin’s Gardens for even longer! Taking everything in stride, the blooms don’t fade, they continue through the summer, and the shrub remains healthy as can be; and the flowers are even fragrant!

Hope for Humanity

Canadian-bred Shrub rose, 5-6’h x 4-5’w, Cold-hardy to Zone3
Aside from the inspiring name, this is a great and unique rose, with a color unmatched in hardy roses – deep blood red opening to rich, unfading crimson. The loosely double flowers are held in large terminal clusters on arching canes, and blooming repeats through the season. Alas, there’s not much fragrance, but Hope for Humanity is very resistant to disease and easy to grow. It was bred in Canada and released in 1984.

John Cabot

Canadian-bred Shrub/Climber, 8-10’h x 3-4’w as climber, Cold-hardy to Zone 3
Brilliant orchid-pink semi-double blossoms almost cover this fast-growing, easy-going shrub or climber, making quite a show! The first climbing rose in Ag. Canada’s Explorer Series, John Cabot was bred by Dr. Felicitas Svejda and introduced in 1977. With excellent hardiness, vigor, disease-resistance, repeat bloom, and even some shade tolerance, John Cabot is hard to beat, especially as a climber. Grown on an arbor or spread out along a fence, it can be quite a bit wider than 4’. Canes are thick, sturdy and upright, and prickly. One has to take the thorns with the roses, right?

Fighting Fireblight

This is a bad year for fireblight which is a bacterial disease affecting mostly apple, pear, crabapple, hawthorn and Mt. Ash. It is spread in the presence of moisture and enters the trees through wounds and open blossoms. Colorado is the worst state in the US for fireblight.

Because of our moist spring and extra wounding caused by hail, there is a lot of infection. Symptoms include black, hooked twig ends, brown or blackened leaves, dried up fruits and sunken cankers that can be a dull orange or black. Fireblight is a difficult disease to manage because there is no cure. Spraying chemicals is not recommended by CSU because they are not very effective, timing is critical and spraying must be repeated.

Pruning out infected branches is the main active solution that can prevent the spread of the disease, but it is tricky because pruning can spread or worsen the disease. There are many views of the “right” way to do it.

Mikl Brawner dealt with fireblighted trees as an arborist for over 35 years. Here is a simplified version of his approach:
Do not prune in spring because the moist conditions and pruning cuts create opportunities for the fireblight to enter the trees. Once conditions are drier, prune fireblighted twigs and branches back 6″-8″ from the infection, and sterilize tools after every cut with Lysol, alcohol or a bleach/water solution.

If there are hundreds of blackened leaves and twigs, wait until the leaves are falling to prune, because when the tree is dormant, pruning can be done without sterilizing every cut. In general make more small cuts than big cuts which take longer to heal and cause more stress to the tree. The infection can be superficial and not as bad as it looks, so pruning less can be better. Also radical pruning stresses the tree and creates more sucker growth, both which increase infection by fireblight.  (Image from Chipps Tree Care Inc.)

Prevention is important when possible. Plant fireblight-resistant varieties. (there are conflicting views, unfortunately) Irrigation that sprays the leaves and keeps the soil saturated encourage fireblight. Strong chemical fertilizers cause fast soft growth that is especially susceptible. Do water when soil is really dry, because stress makes fireblight worse.

There is evidence that organic fertilizers and mineral supplements (like rock dust) applied in September can prevent or reduce fireblight infection by increasing nutrient availability and vitality. Inoculating new tree roots with mycorrhizae can also be helpful.

Don’t ignore fireblight or it will spread, but don’t be afraid to take 2 or 3 years to prune out diseased wood if that allows for smaller cuts. A susceptible variety like Jonathan apple or Bechtel crab may die or have to be removed.

This year may also be bad for fungal diseases like Powdery Mildew which appears as a white covering of leaves and stems with curling of leaves and stems. This can be managed and cured with Green Cure, Neem, Compost Tea and Fungus Pharm—all non-toxic products.  (Image from GrowingProduce.com)

Cultural Prevention: Water deeply and only once or twice (3x in July?). It is best not to spray the leaves with water, and best to water in the morning so the soil can dry out by evening when our cool nights can condense moisture onto the leaves. A mulch reduces fungus spores from splashing up onto leaves.


Classes List

We offer empowering classes with great teachers throughout the season.  Coming soon will be more of our class offerings.  Our teachers have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register, and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.  (This list is also available on our website.)

Sat, Jun 9 at 10 AM – GARDENING ADVICE FROM MOTHER NATURE with Alison Peck

When we move from plant collections to landscapes patterned after nature, our gardens become richer, healthier, and more abundant. We’ll share ecological understandings that allow us to work with nature to conserve resources (including our time), create better habitat for us and wildlife, and weave native plants into regenerative native landscapes.   $15

Sat, Jun 9 at 1 PM – NATIVES FOR EVERY GARDEN with Dan Johnson

Imagine a group of water-thrifty plants that could attract pollinators, create wildlife habitat, provide changing year ‘round color, motion and texture in the garden, mingle happily with other durable plants from around the world, and thrive in all extremes of our Colorado weather. Asking too much? Then you haven’t considered our own native Western plants! Not just for the purist or specialist anymore, natives have gone mainstream. We’ll look at the best of the best and where to use them. From vibrant rock-hardy perennials to swaying grasses and bristling cactus, there a native for every garden niche. Class lasts 1 hour.   $15

Sun, Jun 10 at 1 PM – SUCCESSFUL HOME COMPOSTING with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to turn waste into wealth by cultivating soil microorganisms. Nature does the work if you know how to lend a hand.  In this class, you will learn what works in our climate, and what doesn’t. Mikl has been composting for 35 years.   $15


Sat, Jun 16 at 1 PM – What to do about the Japanese Beetle Invasion with Katie McAllister

Tried and true methods of Japanese beetle reduction by Matrix Gardens’ Katie McAllister. Learn the phases and life stages of this insect and how and when to take environmentally-friendly (but beetle-deadly) action. $15

Sat, Jun 23 at 10 AM – HONEY BEE MEET & GREET with Kristina Williams

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knot hole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside?  Come take a peek inside a working hive of honey bees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general.   Please wear long sleeves and pants.   $15

Sat, Jun 23 1 – 2 PM – HABITAT HERO – WILDSCAPING 101 (Free!) with Laura Somers

Laura Somers, Wildscape Ambassador, representing Audubon Rockies and Colorado Native Plant Society will demonstrate the importance of restoring our communities, one garden patch at a time. From a birds-eye view, learn how to create wildlife-friendly gardens that help combat the loss of open spaces and create green corridors that link your wildscape to larger natural areas by providing habitat for wildlife.   (Free!)

Sun, Jun 24 at 10 AM – COLORADO NATIVE BEES with Kristina Williams

If you have a backyard garden, it’s probably being pollinated by some of Boulder County’s 500+ species of native bees.  We’ll talk about some of the basic types and how you can create bee friendly habitat to invite them to your yard.  Then we’ll walk through Harlequins’ demonstration gardens to observe some of these bees in action.   $15

Sun, Jun 24 at 1 PM – MANAGING GARDEN PESTS WITHOUT POISONS with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to look for and identify common pests, and how to judge if anything needs to be done. Learn which organic solutions are the most effective, for what, and how to do it. Mikl has been walking this talk for 35 years.    $15

Sun, Jul 15 at 1 PM – TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience.   $15

Sat, Jul 21 at 1 PM – BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN with Elaine Walker

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces.              $15

Sun, Aug 5 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 16.)   $15

Sat, Aug 25 from 10 AM to 1 PM – SEVENTH ANNUAL TASTE OF TOMATO

Sat, Aug 25 at 1 PM – GARDENING WITH MUSHROOMS – THE MAGIC OF MYCELIUM w/ Zach Hedstrom

Join Zach for a class about the many ways you can incorporate mushrooms and fungi in your garden and lifestyle. You will learn the basic techniques for growing mushrooms, how to encourage fungal activity in your soil, and about the health-giving properties that you can experience from eating more mushrooms!   $15

Sun, Aug 26 at 1 PM – LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION with Mikl Brawner

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery.   $15

Sun, Sep 9 at 1 PM – HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions.        $15

Sat, Sep 15 at 1 PM – FORAGING ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS: REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID with Zach Hedstrom

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. A good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before.   $15

Sun, Sep 16 at 1 PM – PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug 5.)   $15


Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe.

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos!

We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!
In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

Potatoes Have Rolled In!!

POTATOES HAVE ROLLED IN !!

Five Delicious Varieties

… that were all organically grown here in Colorado.  We have selected these varieties because they all grow very successfully here.  Eve hand-delivered the potatoes yesterday come in and check them out!

GERMAN BUTTERBALL

(Certified ‘seed’ potato) – (heirloom yellow)
German Butterball offers everything you could want in a potato: heirloom quality, deep golden flesh, and a delightfully mild flavor.  Versatile for every kind of preparation.  Best if harvested when small to medium sized. Superior storage.  Approximately 110 days to maturity.

KENNEBEC 

(Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Kennebec is an excellent, widely adapted, medium to late, all-purpose, white potato, bred by the USDA in 1941. This fast-growing variety has high yields of round to oblong tubers with shallow eyes, buff skin and white flesh that maintain good quality in storage. Plants do best when planted at 8-10” spacing to avoid overly-large tubers. The ivory flesh is firm and starchy with minimal water content and offers a rich, earthy and nutty flavor. Excels as a frying potato (fries, hash browns, chips, etc.) and is well suited for baking, mashing or roasting. Kennebec potatoes keep their shape when cooked, perfect for potato salads, curries, soups, stews. Resistant to Potato Virus A and Potato Virus Y; moderate resistance to Potato Virus S, Potato Virus X, blackleg, and foliage late blight.

MOUNTAIN ROSE  

(Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Red inside and out! Bred in & for Colorado. Excellent as potato chips, French fries, oven fries, and also great for baking, mashing, and potato salads. High in antioxidants!  Early to Mid-season.

PURPLE MAJESTY

(Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Uniform, high-yield, deep purple skin and flesh, very high in anthocyanins (high-potency antioxidant).  Bred in and for Colorado.

RED THUMB Fingerling Potato – NEW!

(Certified ‘seed’ potato)  Early (65+ days)
One of the best tasting of the fingerlings, with unique ruby red skin and marbled deep pink and cream flesh that is waxy, firm, and has a buttery taste. A favorite with chefs for their flavor and beauty, their red coloring holds well when cooked.  Excellent for potato salad, soups, mashing, and for grilling or roasting. Red Thumb is easy to grow and produces high yields of medium-sized, well-clustered, finger-shaped potatoes. The tubers are long-keeping and the vines are very vigorous. Be careful not to overcrowd this variety. Harvest in late summer at 2-3” long. They can be grown in grow-bags or large containers. (Photo credit, right: White Flower Farm.)

Potato Growing Instructions

From our friend, Frank Hodge

Potatoes grow best in full sun.  Plant seed potatoes (pieces of potatoes or small whole potatoes – plant whole if they are smaller than a golf ball) with at least 2 eyes per piece. If you are cutting up the potatoes, do so ahead of time (couple hours to a day prior to planting) to give them a chance to form a protective layer for moisture retention and rot resistance.

Plant as soon as when soil can be easily worked.  Plants will begin to grow when the soil temperature reaches 45 degrees.  Plants can tolerate a light frost but be prepared to cover them if a hard frost is expected.

Spread and mix compost into the bottom of a 4-6” deep planting trench. Soil should be moist, but not water-logged.  Plant seed potatoes 4” deep, 1 foot apart, with the eye side up. Potatoes thrive in LOOSE, well drained soil with consistent moisture.

When plants reach about 6” tall, cover them with light compost or straw until just the top inch or two still shows. Continue to cover the plants (called hilling) as they grow. This will result in a fairly significantly sized mound.  Harvest potatoes on a dry day. Soil should NOT be compacted, so digging should be easy, but be gentle so as not to puncture the tubers.  “New” (small) potatoes may be ready in early July.  Mature potatoes should be harvested 2-3 weeks after the vines die (usually late July / early August). Brush off any soil, and store them in a cool, dry, dark place (but not in the refrigerator).  Do not store potatoes with apples as the ethylene gas produced by the apples can cause your potatoes to spoil. Do not wash potatoes until right before use.

Onions, Leeks, & Shallots, Oh My! 

Don’t worry if you haven’t gotten your onions in yet, we still have a nice stock of Walla Walla and Copra onion starts.

And, we have a wonderful selection of onion, leeks and for the first time, shallot seedlings!  These are specialty varieties for those that don’t want an entire bundle.  Come select your favorites from varieties including Cippolini Genova, Ailsa Craig, Walla Walla, Italian Red Bottle, and Purplette Onions.  Bleu de Solaize and King Richard Leeks.  And, Zebrune Shallots.

Weekend Classes

Our classroom will be overflowing this weekend with an amazing collection of THREE CLASSES!   Alison Peck kicks us off on Saturday at 10 AM with her much-loved Edible Landscaping class, showing you how to artfully incorporate food plants into your garden.  Then at 1 PM Katie McAllister (another Matrix Gardens’ guru!) shares What to do about the Japanese Beeltle Invasion.  (None of us want to think about those nasties this early in the season – but now is the best time get informed and prepared!)

On Sunday at 1 PM, Mikl wraps up the weekend sharing great info on Organic Lawn Care – you don’t have to use chemicals to attain a lush, green turf!

Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.

Plant Sale – Coming Soon!

Our Member Plant sale begins very soon on April 28 and extends through May 5.  It’s not too late to renew your annual membership, which will give you a 10% discount on a $50 or more purchase of plants (excluding roses & fruit trees) during that timeframe!

We are very appreciative of your membership as all along, we have depended on recycled materials, trades, word-of-mouth promotion, generosity, kindness, passion, service and other non-corporate building blocks to create our success. This year we are going to use membership money to buy labels for our demonstration gardens. We know our labeling has been lacking. This will make our gardens more educational.

If you like what we have been doing, please become a member and help us to do it better, and enjoy the benefits of membership.  For a $20 donation, you’ll receive membership for the current calendar year and the following benefits:

1)  Half-price Harlequin’s Class of your choice
2)  25% discount on books all year
3)  During the May Day Week get $10 off a $50 or more purchase of plants (excluding roses & fruit trees)
4)  During May Day Week, take 10% off roses (except quarts), then
5)  in August begin the fall sale a week early with 20% off most everything.

You can become a member anytime you are at the nursery, or mail a check for $20 to
Harlequin’s Gardens
4795 N.26th St.
Boulder, CO. 80301

We will put you in our Membership file. A membership is valid until the end of the calendar year.
THANK YOU TO ALL OUR MEMBERS!!!

Veggies in the House!

In addition to tomato starts, we have a beautiful bounty of cool-season veggies, which can be planted after a few days of hardening-off or under row cover fabric. We have two weights of row cover. The lightest one is Seed Guard and it can be laid directly over seeds, giving 3 degrees additional protection, and shielding them from critters. Ensulate is the heavier weight product and it can last many years.

Artichoke

‘Romanesco’ and ‘Imperial Star Globe’

Arugula

‘Astro’

Broccoli

‘Aspabroc’ hybrid, Raab/Rapini, ‘Fiesta’ hybrid, ‘Arcadia’ hybrid, ‘Happy Rich’ hybrid mini broccoli, and ‘Miranda’

Cabbage

‘Fioretto 60’ flowering stick type hybrid, ‘Copenhagen Green’, ‘Red Acre’, ‘Chinese/Napa’

Cauliflower

‘Vitaverde’ green hybrid, ‘Graffiti’ hybrid

Collards

‘Cascade Glaze’

Endive

‘Romanesco’

Kale

‘Red Russian’, ‘Beedy’s Camden’, ‘Darkibor’ hybrid, ‘Baltisk Red’, and ‘Chinese/Kailaan’

Kohlrabi

‘Winner’ hybrid

Lettuce

Tom Thumb, Yugoslavian Red

Pak Choy

‘White Stem’, ‘Da Hong’

Spinach

Purple Orach, ‘Oceanside’ hybrid, ‘Escalade’ hybrid, and ‘Avon’ hybrid

Swiss Chard

‘Perpetual’, ‘Fordhook Giant’, ‘Bright Lights’, ‘Bali Red Rhubarb’, and ‘Seafoam’

Tatsoi

 

Celeriac

‘Bianco del Veneto’

Chicory

‘Orchidea Rossa’
Herbs are also in!

Including parsley, thyme, rosemary, mint, lovage, santolina, fever few, garlic chives, artemisia, lavender, bronze fennel, culinary sage and oregano, nettles, and camomile – wow! 

Classes List

We offer empowering classes with great teachers throughout the season.  Coming soon will be more of our class offerings.  Our teachers have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register, and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.

Our APRIL CLASSES Include: 

(This list is also available on our website.)

Sat, Apr 14 at 10 AM – EDIBLE LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck 

Learn how to grow fruits, nuts, vegetables, vines and herbs in your yard, beautifully. Learn which plants are the most successful and how to integrate them into your landscape. Alison has been designing edible landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping.  $15

Sat, Apr 14 at 1 PM – WHAT TO DO ABOUT the JAPANESE BEETLE INVASION with Katie McAllister

Tried and true methods of Japanese beetle reduction by Matrix Gardens’ Katie McAllister. Learn the phases and life stages of this insect and how and when to take environmentally-friendly (but beetle-deadly) action.  $15    

Sun, Apr 15 at 1 PM – ORGANIC LAWN CARE with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to support healthy soil and soil life using compost, organic fertilizers, aeration, proper watering, and mowing, and how to avoid and deal with weeds.  $15

Sat, Apr 21 at 10 AM – NATIVE BEES for the YOUNGSTERS! #1 with Jessica Goldstrohm

Children and parents learn together about native bees in this hands-on, super-fun class! Jessica will introduce you to our native bee species & their habitat needs, you will build a Leaf Cutter Bee House to take home, and sing the new Bumble Bee song! Hungry Honey Bee book & seeds available for purchase. (repeated on May 26)  $20, one parent and one child. $5 per additional child.    

Sat, Apr 21 at 1 PM – GROWING PEPPERS on the FRONT RANGE with Mimi Yanus

Learn how to grow the best peppers for the Boulder area. We’ll discuss types of peppers, soil, water and fertility requirements, propagation requirements, growing tips, and varieties that do well on the Front Range. $15

Sun, Apr 22 from 10-3 – MUSHROOM CULTIVATION and IDENTIFICATION with Zach Hedstrom

Mushrooms are delicious and healthy, but also shrouded in mystery! Learn more about them in this Mushroom Cultivation and Identification Workshop taught by mycology enthusiast Zach Hedstrom. Plan to leave the class with basic knowledge about how to grow mushrooms, the ways in which fungi can increase ecological vitality, as well as familiarity with the process of identification and various local wild mushroom species. Participants will partake in 2 hands-on mushroom growing activities and take away a log inoculated with Oyster Mushroom spawn that, with proper care, will produce tasty mushrooms for multiple years. Everyone will also receive a handout packet for help in identifying local mushrooms. Participants should bring their own lunch, and weather-appropriate clothing. It will be a day full of fungi, and FUN!  $50 per person, 12 person maximum.

Sun, Apr 29 at 12:30 PM – BABY GOAT DAY!  FREE!

Margaret Hollander, owner of Capering Goat Dairy, is bringing several of her adorable baby goats by for a visit.  Stop by with your children, or your own inner child, to enjoy their hilarious antics!   FREE!

Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe.

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos!

We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!

In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

Veggies Love Solar Caps!!

VEGGIES LOVE SOLAR CAPS!!

We Love Solar Caps!

You’ve been asking for tomato starts, and they’re in!  Beginning this weekend, the first of our great varieties of organic, neonic-free tomato starts will be ready for sale for those of you with greenhouses and smart gardeners with Solar Caps!  Despite our wide-ranging temperatures at this time of year, you can plant your tomatoes using a Solar Caps. (pictured above and right)

Solar Caps are a vast improvement over the well-known Wall-o-Water, which are prone to collapsing and crushing your plants! Solar Caps have 8 wire legs that keep it firmly secured in place. Solar Caps don’t have all those seams to leak, and the only part that requires annual replacement is the very inexpensive customized plastic bag. We like to keep the Solar Caps on our vining tomatoes throughout the season to moderate soil temperatures. They can be used to get a head-start on Peppers, Eggplants, Squashes, Cucumbers and Melons, but should be removed from those shorter plants when temperatures allow.

Solar Caps consist of a sturdy, re-usable, welded galvanized steel wire frame over which you drape the water-filled plastic bag that comes with the kit.  By positioning the Solar Cap where your tomato (or other warm-season veggies) will be planted, in 5-7 days your soil will be warm enough for planting (55+ Fahrenheit).  Following planting, Solar Caps form a personal greenhouse for your veggies, which improves growth throughout the season.  We’ve had great success using them for many years and regularly plant our tomatoes by April 15.

Weekend Classes

In keeping with veggie planting, on Saturday at 1:00 expert culinary gardener, Tracy Parrish, will show you how to keep your veggie garden in continual production (Succession Planting) of when and where to properly plant your veggies.  Her schedule table alone is worth the $15 price of admission!

Then on Sunday at 1:00, Mikl partners with Front Range Wild Ones , whose mission is to preserve biodiversity through the preservation, restoration and establishment of native plant communities, in showing you how to Design with Natives.  (Wild Ones members $15, non-members $20.)

Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.

Bee Barn Sale – Yippee!

Christina, our Queen Bee, has put two very special products on sale – Top Bar Hives and Foundationless Frames.  Come in and check them out, along with our other wonderful Beekeeping Supplies!

Spring Sale on Top Bar Hives!  $50 off!

We are putting our Kelley TBHs on sale for $50 off!  This unique design features V-shaped top bars that are the same as the Langstroth foundationless frames.  The longer, one piece bar makes for a more secure comb attachment. It also opens options for transferring combs between the TBH and a Langstroth hive so it’s easier to share bees with your Langstroth Friends!  This hive comes with legs and a peaked roof and is made of clear pine.

Spring Sale Foundationless Frames!  10% off!

Have you thought about going foundationless?!  If you prefer your bees to live on their own homemade wax comb, this is the way to go.  We have Langstroth frames that have a one piece V-shaped top bar designed to give the bees a starting place for comb. The end bars have holes in case you want to reinforce with cross wires.  The easiest method for you and your bees is to place these frames between two already drawn frames so the bees use them as a guide and don’t get too “creative”. A good nectar flow is the best time to do this.  Use the shallow or medium frames to make cut comb or chunk honey.

Veggies in the House!

In addition to tomato starts, we have a beautiful bounty of cool-season veggies, which can be planted after a few days of hardening-off.

Artichoke

‘Romanesco’ and ‘Imperial Star Globe’

Arugula

‘Astro’

Broccoli

‘Aspabroc’ hybrid, Raab/Rapini, ‘Fiesta’ hybrid, ‘Arcadia’ hybrid, ‘Happy Rich’ hybrid mini broccoli, and ‘Miranda’

Cabbage

‘Fioretto 60’ flowering stick type hybrid, ‘Copenhagen Green’, ‘Red Acre’, ‘Chinese/Napa’

Cauliflower

‘Vitaverde’ green hybrid, ‘Graffiti’ hybrid

Collards

‘Cascade Glaze’

Endive

‘Romanesco’

Kale

‘Red Russian’, ‘Beedy’s Camden’, ‘Darkibor’ hybrid, ‘Baltisk Red’, and ‘Chinese/Kailaan’

Kohlrabi

‘Winner’ hybrid

Pak Choy

‘White Stem’, ‘Da Hong’

Spinach

Purple Orach, ‘Oceanside’ hybrid, ‘Escalade’ hybrid, and ‘Avon’ hybrid

Swiss Chard

‘Perpetual’, ‘Fordhook Giant’, ‘Bright Lights’, ‘Bali Red Rhubarb’, and ‘Seafoam’

Tatsoi

 

Celeriac

‘Bianco del Veneto’

Chicory

‘Orchidea Rossa’

Classes List

We offer empowering classes with great teachers throughout the season.  Coming soon will be more of our class offerings.  Our teachers have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register, and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.

Our APRIL CLASSES Include: 

(This list is also available on our website.)

Sat, Apr 7 at 1 PM SUCCESSION PLANTING with Tracey Parrish

Learn the techniques and timing to maximize your garden space and keep your veggie garden in continual production throughout the seasons. This class provides participants with an extensive planting schedule table, outlining when and where to start your seeds, the time to transplant out and when to expect harvest. Tracey is expert in culinary gardening, has a large garden and sells produce and cut flowers at local farmers markets.  $15

Sun, Apr 8 at 1 PM – DESIGNING with NATIVES with Mikl Brawner

Natives are wild plants. Learn which ones will fit in a tidy landscape and which ones are better in a wildlife corner. We will discuss the difference between a native and a cloned native variety or hybrid. Learn how to balance control with natural. Wild Ones members $15, non-members $20.

Sat, Apr 14 at 10 AM – EDIBLE LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck 

Learn how to grow fruits, nuts, vegetables, vines and herbs in your yard, beautifully. Learn which plants are the most successful and how to integrate them into your landscape. Alison has been designing edible landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping.  $15

Sat, Apr 14 at 1 PM – WHAT TO DO ABOUT the JAPANESE BEETLE INVASION with Katie McAllister

Tried and true methods of Japanese beetle reduction by Matrix Gardens’ Katie McAllister. Learn the phases and life stages of this insect and how and when to take environmentally-friendly (but beetle-deadly) action.  $15    

Sun, Apr 15 at 10 AM – CREATE YOUR OWN PERENNIAL FOOD FOREST with David Bailey

We will look at the different steps from grading, hugelkultur, irrigation to plant specifics. Attendees of this class will leave knowing how to create a thriving ecology that feeds humans and animals alike while protecting our riparian areas.  David studied Environmental Science at Metropolitan State College and is a certified Permaculture Designer. He sees that natural forms can be married to natural functions within the landscape. He is “relentlessly seeking ecologically sensible landscapes that fit our clients varied visions and our changing Colorado climate.”  $15

Sun, Apr 15 at 1 PM – ORGANIC LAWN CARE with Mikl Brawner

Learn how to support healthy soil and soil life using compost, organic fertilizers, aeration, proper watering, and mowing, and how to avoid and deal with weeds.  $15

Sat, Apr 21 at 10 AM – NATIVE BEES for the YOUNGSTERS! #1 with Jessica Goldstrohm

Children and parents learn together about native bees in this hands-on, super-fun class! Jessica will introduce you to our native bee species & their habitat needs, you will build a Leaf Cutter Bee House to take home, and sing the new Bumble Bee song! Hungry Honey Bee book & seeds available for purchase. (repeated on May 26)  $20, one parent and one child. $5 per additional child.    

Sat, Apr 21 at 1 PM – GROWING PEPPERS on the FRONT RANGE with Mimi Yanus

Learn how to grow the best peppers for the Boulder area. We’ll discuss types of peppers, soil, water and fertility requirements, propagation requirements, growing tips, and varieties that do well on the Front Range. $15

Sun, Apr 22 from 10-3 – MUSHROOM CULTIVATION and IDENTIFICATION with Zach Hedstrom

Mushrooms are delicious and healthy, but also shrouded in mystery! Learn more about them in this Mushroom Cultivation and Identification Workshop taught by mycology enthusiast Zach Hedstrom. Plan to leave the class with basic knowledge about how to grow mushrooms, the ways in which fungi can increase ecological vitality, as well as familiarity with the process of identification and various local wild mushroom species. Participants will partake in 2 hands-on mushroom growing activities and take away a log inoculated with Oyster Mushroom spawn that, with proper care, will produce tasty mushrooms for multiple years. Everyone will also receive a handout packet for help in identifying local mushrooms. Participants should bring their own lunch, and weather-appropriate clothing. It will be a day full of fungi, and FUN!  $50 per person, 12 person maximum.

Sun, Apr 29 at 12:30 – PM – BABY GOAT DAY!  FREE!

Margaret Hollander, owner of Capering Goat Dairy, is bringing several of her adorable baby goats by for a visit.  Stop by with your children, or your own inner child, to enjoy their hilarious antics!   FREE!

 

Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe.

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos!

We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!

In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

 

Veggie Starts are Here!

VEGGIE STARTS ARE HERE!!

Our delightful spring weather is a reminder that cool season veggies can be planted now!  We are stocked with locally-grown, organic, neonic-free veggie starts – and with super seeds from Botanical Interests and Beauty Beyond Belief – that are ready for your garden!  See our comprehensive list, below.

After hardening-off, our cool season veggie starts are ready to be planted with no protection.  Should you like to give your plants further protection from the elements and a few degrees of temperature buffer, check-out our Solar Caps (shown right with a tomato plant), and two weights of row cover. The lightest one is Seed Guard and it can be laid directly over seeds, giving 3 degrees additional protection, and shielding them from critters. Ensulate is the heavier weight product and it can last many years.

This, and next, weekend’s line-up of classes will further support your spring planting endeavors.  On Saturday morning, Alison Peck demonstrates how easy Do-it-Yourself Drip Irrigation can be.   On Sunday morning our talented propagator, Gary Meis, shows you how to cultivate native plants from seeds in Plant Propagation 101.  That afternoon Mikl discusses Building Topsoil & Fertility – the perfect thing to be doing in the spring.  And, don’t forget that next Saturday, Mimi Yanis offers her wonderful Getting Started in Veggie Gardening class!  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.


Onions

Bare root onion plants in bundles have arrived, including Copra, Walla Walla, and Redwing varieties.  These onions are robust and can be planted right away!  The earlier you plant them the larger they can grow because they are long-day onions and the sun keeps feeding the plant until Summer Solstice when the bulbs then begin to plump-up.  Note: Avoid planting onions where Brassica family veggies were grown last year, or they won’t thrive.  Plants in the Brassica family include arugula, kale, broccoli, collard greens, mustard, cauliflower, and most Asian greens, etc.  Onions thrive with lots of sun, fertile soil, consistent watering, and free of weed competition. 


Veggies in the House!

Artichoke

‘Romanesco’ and ‘Imperial Star Globe’

Arugula

‘Astro’

Broccoli

‘Aspabroc’ hybrid, Raab/Rapini, ‘Fiesta’ hybrid, ‘Arcadia’ hybrid, ‘Happy Rich’ hybrid mini broccoli, and ‘Miranda’

Cabbage

‘Fioretto 60’ flowering stick type hybrid, ‘Copenhagen Green’, ‘Red Acre’, ‘Chinese/Napa’

Cauliflower

‘Vitaverde’ green hybrid, ‘Graffiti’ hybrid

Collards

‘Cascade Glaze’

Endive

‘Romanesco’

Kale

‘Red Russian’, ‘Beedy’s Camden’, ‘Darkibor’ hybrid, ‘Baltisk Red’, and ‘Chinese/Kailaan’

Kohlrabi

‘Winner’ hybrid

Pak Choy

‘White Stem’, ‘Da Hong’

Spinach

Purple Orach, ‘Oceanside’ hybrid, ‘Escalade’ hybrid, and ‘Avon’ hybrid

Swiss Chard

‘Perpetual’, ‘Fordhook Giant’, ‘Bright Lights’, ‘Bali Red Rhubarb’, and ‘Seafoam’

Tatsoi

Celeriac

‘Bianco del Veneto’

Chicory

‘Orchidea Rossa’


Classes List

We offer empowering classes with great teachers throughout the season.  Coming soon will be more of our class offerings.  Our teachers have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register, and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.

Our MARCH CLASSES Include: 

(This list is also available on our website.)

Sat, Mar 24 at 10 AM – DO-IT-YOURSELF DRIP IRRIGATION with Alison Peck

Drip irrigation can be easy! Come learn a simple, easy to design and install system that can be connected to an outside hose bib with a battery-operated timer, giving you inexpensive automatic watering. Alison Peck of Matrix Gardens will also discuss new efficient sprinklers that can reduce water use for lawns and groundcovers.   $15                (Photo credit: BSN Tech Networks)

Sun, Mar 25 at 10 AM – PLANT PROPAGATION 101 with Gary Meis

Propagating and multiplying plants are useful skills that everyone can learn!  With over 35 years of experience, Gary Meis, Harlequin’s Gardens own propagator, will discuss methods of propagation and the pros and cons of each.  Specifically, this class will cover Different ways to break the dormancy of our western native seeds, How to find and collect native seeds, How to clean your seeds, and should you?, How to treat your seeds for optimum sprouting, How to keep your babies alive when small, and Alternatives to seed grown natives.  Cool stuff!  $15

Sun, Mar 25 at 1 PM – BUILDING TOPSOIL & FERTILITY with Mikl Brawner

Mikl will discuss how to support soil life, enrich poor soils, and improve plant health and nutrition from the bottom up: composts, fertilizers, mulching, worms, deficiencies, and tilth.   $15


Sat, Mar 31 at 10 AM – GETTING STARTED IN VEGETABLE GARDENING with Mimi Yanus

If you are new to Colorado, new to vegetable gardening, or have been unhappy with the results of your earlier attempts, this class is for you. Learn from Mimi Yanus what you need to know to make your new organic vegetable garden successful, even bountiful, even in Colorado conditions!  $15


Coming next week…

Our Spring Newsletter – brimming with great info on our plants, classes and more, for the upcoming season!

 

Happy Plants Begin with Happy Soil

HAPPY PLANTS BEGIN with HAPPY SOIL!!

Before Mikl talks about soil enrichment, below, we want to remind you that we have two wonderful classes this weekend: On Saturday morning Mimi Yanus – a renowned veggie gardener – will share How to Get Started with Veggie Gardening.  This is a super class for those that are new to the area, or felt that they didn’t have the success in their garden last year that they wanted.  (Forward this email to your new neighbor!)  Then on Sunday afternoon Mikl shares the importance and techniques for Spring Pruning.  Pruning can be overwhelming, but Mikl will give you insight on how to simplify and approach this task.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.

Onions are Here!

Bare root onion plants in bundles have arrived, including Copra, Walla Walla, and Redwing varieties.  These onions are robust and can be planted right away!  The earlier you plant them the larger they can grow because they are long-day onions and the sun keeps feeding the plant until Summer Solstice when the bulbs then begin to plump-up.  Note: Avoid planting onions where Brassica family veggies were grown last year, or they won’t thrive.  Plants in the Brassica family include arugula, kale, broccoli, collard greens, mustard, cauliflower, and most Asian greens, etc.  Onions thrive with lots of sun, fertile soil, consistent watering, and free of weed competition. 

Some of Our cool season starts (broccoli, arugula and cabbage) have arrived – come in and get them!  (As a note, the veggie starts do need to be hardened-off.)  As for our other veggie starts, take a look at our 2018 Veggie Starts List to see the wonderful selections we’re growing for you!

Classes List

We offer empowering classes with great teachers throughout the season.  Coming soon will be more of our class offerings.  Our teachers have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register, and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class.  Pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403.

Our MARCH CLASSES Include: 

(This list is also available on our website.)

Sat, Mar 17 at 10 AM – GETTING STARTED IN VEGETABLE GARDENING w/ Mimi Yanus

If you are new to Colorado, new to vegetable gardening, or have been unhappy with the results of your earlier attempts, this class is for you. Learn from Mimi Yanus what you need to know to make your new organic vegetable garden successful, even bountiful, even in Colorado conditions!  $15  (Repeated on Sat, March 31.)

Sun, Mar 18 at 1 PM – SPRING PRUNING with Mikl Brawner

There are shrubs that should not be pruned in the spring and there are shrubs, roses and vines that are best pruned in spring. Learn which to prune when, and how to prune for strength, beauty, and production of fruit and flowers.  (This is not a repeat of the Fall Pruning Class.)   $15


Sat, Mar 24 at 10 AM – DO-IT-YOURSELF DRIP IRRIGATION with Alison Peck

Drip irrigation can be easy! Come learn a simple, easy to design and install system that can be connected to an outside hose bib with a battery-operated timer, giving you inexpensive automatic watering. Alison Peck of Matrix Gardens will also discuss new efficient sprinklers that can reduce water use for lawns and groundcovers.   $15                (Photo credit: BSN Tech Networks)

Sun, Mar 25 at 10 AM – PLANT PROPAGATION 101 with Gary Meis

Propagating and multiplying plants are useful skills that everyone can learn!  With over 35 years of experience, Gary Meis, Harlequin’s Gardens own propagator, will discuss methods of propagation and the pros and cons of each.  Specifically, this class will cover Different ways to break the dormancy of our western native seeds, How to find and collect native seeds, How to clean your seeds, and should you?, How to treat your seeds for optimum sprouting, How to keep your babies alive when small, and Alternatives to seed grown natives.  Cool stuff!  $15

Sun, Mar 25 at 1 PM – BUILDING TOPSOIL & FERTILITY with Mikl Brawner

Mikl will discuss how to support soil life, enrich poor soils, and improve plant health and nutrition from the bottom up: composts, fertilizers, mulching, worms, deficiencies, and tilth.   $15

Sat, Mar 31 at 10 AM – GETTING STARTED IN VEGETABLE GARDENING with Mimi Yanus

If you are new to Colorado, new to vegetable gardening, or have been unhappy with the results of your earlier attempts, this class is for you. Learn from Mimi Yanus what you need to know to make your new organic vegetable garden successful, even bountiful, even in Colorado conditions!  $15  (Repeat of Sat, March 17.)


Products for Building and Supporting Healthy Soils

Harlequin’s Gardens has been studying soil health for many years now, because soil health is needed for plant health, for plant resistance to pests and diseases and for nutritional value of plants. We believe that a strong Soil Life with all the beneficial fungi, bacteria, earthworm etc. is the goal to digest the nutrients in the soil and make them into plant-available forms.

Our soils also are deficient in organic matter and available nutrients. Colorado soils do have nutrients, but many are not in a form that’s available to plants. So, Harlequin’s has sourced most of our soil-building products form businesses as local as possible, almost all from Colorado. Local products use our local wastes (like landscape wastes, beer wastes, food wastes, beetle-kill pine, mushroom waste, dairy cow manure, chicken manure). This supports local businesses to recycle and because trucking distances are greatly reduced, we are cutting down on carbon emissions. Putting these organic wastes into the soil also sequesters carbon. And because carbon is one of Life’s main building blocks, these products help build fertility.

This year we have many returning products and some new products that we’d like to tell you about.

Rocky Mt. Minerals

From Salida, this broad spectrum of many different minerals that support plant strength and immune function, including 11% Calcium, 6% Sulfur plus magnesium, iron, and many others. The big difference with this product is that its geothermal source makes these minerals much more available.

Humate

This is a mined carbon concentrate that multiplies microorganisms and has the effect of making nutrients in the soil available. We have been using this for years in our potting mixes.

Walden’s Organics

Since Maxfields moved over the mountain and lost quality, we have been looking for a good local soil for larger containers and for raised beds. Local topsoil and Planters Mixes contain too much clay. Walden’s Organics uses an OMRI certified cow manure with 6+ year-aged forest humus (from beetle-kill pine), biochar etc. We have been using their potting soil and forest humus and think they are good and much more economical than Maxfields.  These are somewhat new for us and we would appreciate your feedback.

Walden’s Potting Soil

Is ideal for containers, planter boxes, and raised beds. Contains 8 qts beetle-kill aged wood chips, peat moss, biochar, OMRI cow manure compost, perlite, and nutrients. Voted best new product at ProGreen Expo 2016 and has a 100% satisfaction guarantee.  Last year we mixed this potting soil 50/50 with Foxfarm’s Coco Loco and had good results in one trial.

Walden’s Outdoor Garden Mix

For amending garden soils to increase porosity, organic matter, water holding capacity, and nutrition. Mix 10-25% with soils. Contains: 8 qt. bag containing aged beetle-kill woodchips, OMRI cow manure compost and biochar.  In addition to its use as a soil amendment, Walden recommends using this 50/50 with Walden’s Potting Mix for filling large containers and raised beds. We would also suggest adding Harlequin’s Fertility Mix.

Walden’s Garden Mulch

For mulching perennials, shrubs, and vegetable gardens. Sprinkle some organic fertilizer on the soil, then apply mulch 1-3” thick.  Holds moisture, resists weeds, and feeds worms and microbes. Contains 5-8 year aged beetle-kill wood chips.  This forest humus mulch is so broken down that we are planning to use it this year to mulch our veggie garden. We do sell straw because straw breaks down in one season. Most wood chips are so raw that it is not advisable to turn them into the soil, because they cause a nitrogen deficiency until they break down.

Harlequin’s Fertility Mix

A mix of Biosol Certified Organic 6-1-1 Fertilizer, humate, molasses, endomycorrhizae, and calcium. Increases root mass, top growth, soil life, and productivity naturally.  This is not just a fertilizer. The combination of ingredients and mycorrhizae act synergistically to support fertility. It has gotten rave reviews. Try it and let us know your experience.

Corn Gluten

A non-toxic, weed-and-feed with 9% nitrogen. It inhibits seed germination, but is harmless to plants with root systems, people, worms, and microorganisms. The effect can last up to 6 months and is especially useful in lawns. Apply in September/October, and again in late February/March to prevent the majority of existing weed seeds from germinating.

Alpha One

100% organic fertilizer for vegetables and ornamentals. Contains: 7% Nitrogen, 2% Phosphorus, 2% Potash, 1% Iron, 1% Sulphur, with a pH of 6.2. Formulated in Loveland for Colorado Soils.

Richlawn Organic

A 100% organic product comprised of dehydrated poultry waste. Listed by OMRI for organic use. Ideal for lawns, trees, shrubs, annuals, perennials, vegetables and roses. Covers 2,000 sq ft for turf.

EcoGro Compost

A Class 1 compost made from leaves, grass, chipped branches, and beer wastes. It has a healthy population of microorganisms and diverse nutrients.  It is very stable and will not burn or steal nitrogen.  It is fine textured, low in salts with some woody particles.  The pH is 8.3; the NPK 1-1-1.

Western Grow Compost

From Boulder County landscape and food wastes. Well composted. Good non-burning soil builder, reduces carbon dioxide and shipping. Great local resource. NPK 1.5-0.64-1

Eko Compost

Made from forest and recycled wood products composted with poultry manure. Use in vegetable and flower gardens, lawns, trees, shrubs. Improves soil’s physical, chemical, and biological health.

Eko Lawn Topdressing

Finely screened compost perfect for top dressing lawns after aeration.  Holds moisture next to the roots increasing drought tolerance. Supports microorganisms.

Mushroom Compost

From a local mushroom farm.  Dark, rich humus that feeds soil life, improves soil structure & aeration, saves water. Great soil amendment for veggies, perennials, roses & shrubs. Also, a superb mulch for roses.

Coco Loco Potting Soil

A superior coir-based potting media produced from coconut husks, making it one of nature’s most abundant renewable resources.  This mix also contains earthworm castings, bat guano, kelp meal and oyster shell.  It resists compaction, easily rewets, and absorbs evenly for excellent aeration and maximum drainage.

Ocean Forest Potting Soil

A nutrient-rich soil for planting seedlings. It performed well in our tests. Contains: composted bark, sphagnum peat, fish emulsion, crab, earthworm castings, loam, perlite, bat guano, granite dust, kelp meal.

Biochar

A highly adsorbent, specially-produced charcoal applied to soil as a means to increase soil fertility and agricultural yields and sequester carbon.

EcoPett

A natural pine coop bedding (or cat litter!). Contains recycled beetle-kill pine and activated carbon, making it very absorbent, with powerful odor control. It outperforms and outlasts hay and wood shavings. Expands up to 5X when wet. Reduces cleaning by 50%. Not a soil amendment, but a local, recycled beetle-kill pine product to help care for your poultry and other small animals.


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We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!

In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens