It’s Pollinator Month!

Our recent weather pattern of a sunny morning and early afternoon followed by afternoon rain showers seems to be a nice return to the weather patterns we used to have in this area.  This provides a welcome environment for gardening and planting new plants.  Our herb section is looking especially bounteous as is our collection of columbine plants and clematis vines.  We hope that you stop by to see our newest offerings of neonic-free, pollinator friendly, Colorado-adapted plants!

Our pollinator friendly plants are particularly important since June is Pollinator Month in Boulder, and June 17-23 is National Pollinator Week.  Harlequin’s Gardens is here to help you celebrate in a variety of ways! In Kristina Williams’ June Bee Buzz article below, she outlines the many ways you can support our local pollinators.  Kristina is a professional entomologist, president the Boulder Beekeepers Association, a beekeeper for 35 years, and Director of Harlequin’s Gardens’ Bee-keeping supply shop. She is available to help people with beekeeping questions and beekeeping equipment, and is teaching several Bee Classes, outlined below..

We have a not-to-be-missed class this weekend – Zach Hedstrom’s ‘Mushroom Cultivation and Identification’ class!  This is a unique opportunity for you to learn in a hands-on environment about local wild mushrooms: how to identify (participants will receive a mushroom identification packet for local mushrooms), spore plugs, and knowledge on how to grow them – a bargain for the $75 class cost!  This full day (Saturday, June 8 from 10 AM to 3 PM) class will be led by noted mycology expert, Zach Hedstrom.  We’re so fortunate to have his expertise for an entire day!  Last year Eve attended the class and said that everyone had a great time and learned so much; additionally other attendees have reported fantastic results growing their own mushrooms! Please call soon to reserve your spot as we have a 12 person maximum.   

On Sunday at 1:00, Mikl will teach you how to redirect your table scraps and garden clippings into food for the soil – a process know as composting.  In this “Successful Home Composting” class Mikl will show you how to let nature do the work for you! 

Further class details are listed below and as always, please call to register:  303-939-9403. 




OUR WARM-SEASON VEGGIE SELECTION IS HOT!

Our selection of tomatoes is very abundant as is our winter squashes and melons.  Soon we will have more cucumber and zucchini starts ready for you.  Below are our current in-stock selections of tomatoes, peppers and eggplants.  

TOMATOES 



PEPPERS 



EGGPLANTS 




JUNE BEE BUZZ 

The month of June is Pollinator Month in Boulder, and June 17-23 is National Pollinator Week.  Harlequin’s Gardens is here to help you celebrate in a variety of ways!

PLANTS

The best way to support pollinators is to provide safe forage and habitat.  First, our plants are all neonicotinoid-free. Neonicotinoids are systemic insecticides that circulate through the entire plant, including nectar and pollen, which are collected by bees for food.  Bees, with their fuzzy bodies and need for pollen for their baby food are the best pollinators.

Second, our plants are adapted to our local environment. This means that they’re ‘happier’ here and require less chemical and water input.  We carry many plants from ground covers to trees, among them Nepeta (catmint) and Helianthus (sunflower), that will provide for pollinators in general, as well as some plants visited by bee specialists, for example Sphaeralcea (mallow) and Oenothera (evening primrose).  Even our own-root roses, selected for our climate and soils, are good for pollinators.  As a rule of thumb, if you can see the stamens, so can the bees. Ask for our pollinator plant lists to help you shop. 

Ask for our pollinator plant lists to help you shop, or prepare in advance by visiting our website “Plants for Bees and other Pollinators” and “Plants for Pollinators List”

PICTURED POLLINATOR PLANTS:

Top Row: Tiger Swallowtail on Larkspur,  Seseli gummiferum (Moon Carrot)
Second Row: Genista lydia (Dwarf Golden Broom), Allium ‘Millenium’, Achillea (Yarrow)
Third Row: Origanum ‘Kent’s Beauty, Native bee on native Gaillardia, Gallardia aristata
Fourth Row: Asclepias curassavica (Milkweed), Sambucus nigra (Elderberry), Dictamnus albus (Gas Plant)

UPCOMING POLLINATOR CLASSES 

We’ll feature pollinators in our classes too where you can learn how to support the important role of bees, birds, butterflies, bats, and beetles in pollinating our lovely flowers, native plants, fruits, and veggies. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 22 

Saturday morning at 10 AM, our own entomologist, Kristina Williams, will show you how to recognize and attract “Beneficial Insects” to your garden. 

This is followed at 1 PM by our (Free!) and very special Habitat Hero Wildscaping 101 class.  Here Laura Somers helps you to view gardens as a bird does when seeking shelter, food and nesting opportunities.  A wealth of knowledge for a fantastic price!

SUNDAY, JUNE 23 

Kristina returns on Sunday morning at 10 AM to share info on our most important, and perhaps underrated, pollinators: Colorado Native Bees.  She will tell you about our local species, where and how they nest, and their integral role in our ecosystem. 

Then at 1 PM, Mikl teaches us how to Manage Garden Pests Without Using Poisons – increasingly important techniques in our evolving world. Mikl has over 30 years of non-toxic gardening experience and wisdom to share!

We’re so proud to be offering these important classes and hope to see you there!  As always, pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403. 

SUPPLIES​

This year our Bee Barn offers supplies for cultivating some of the Front Range’s 500+ species of native bees as well as the better known European honey bee.

This is the month to start making serious plans for the health of your honey bees.  Varroa mite levels will climb steeply in July, but we have the tools to monitor them and ways to knock them down before they knock your bees down. European Foulbrood has been rearing its ugly head too.  We carry easy-to-use diagnostic kits to determine whether your bees have it and will need to be seen by a vet.

NATIVE BEES

Honey bees aren’t practical for everyone, but our native, mostly solitary bees did ALL of the bee-pollinating in the Americas before the introduction of honey bees from Europe in the 1600s.  They love our weather, soils and native plants. And we love them! This year we’re excited to add a selection of products to help you culture some of these gentle hole nesting bees where you live, including mason bees and leafcutter bees.  Did you know that re-using old nesting tubes or blocks drilled with holes can promote diseases and parasites? We’ve partnered with Crown Bees to bring you responsible, sustainable, clean culture methods, based on the needs of the bees.

Here’s a sample of the items we’re offering. 

Native Bee Chalet

For placing nesting tubes for the current season and an attic for placing the previous season’s bees to emerge in the current season.

Reusable cardboard mason bee tubes with disposable paper liners

For those interested in spring mason bees in particular. Pollinator Pack: Tubes in an assortment of sizes and materials provide nesting holes for a variety of our native bees.

Native Bee Guide Booklet

A brief introduction to just some of the bee species that may nest in your native bee house.

The Mason Bee Revolution book

For those who are seriously into mason bees, early season pollinators.

For more information about Pollinator Partnership, visit their website where you’ll also find additional Programs, Resources and Events.



OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

JUNE

Sat, Jun 8, 10 AM to 3 PM      
MUSHROOM CULTIVATION AND IDENTIFICATION HANDS-ON CLASS 
with Zach Hedstrom 

Mushrooms are delicious and healthy, but also shrouded in mystery! Learn more about them in this Mushroom Cultivation and Identification Workshop taught by mycology enthusiast Zach Hedstrom. Plan to leave the class with basic knowledge about how to grow mushrooms, the ways in which fungi can increase ecological vitality, as well as familiarity with the process of identification and various local wild mushroom species. Participants will partake in 2 hands-on mushroom growing activities and take away a log inoculated with Oyster Mushroom spawn that, with proper care, will produce tasty mushrooms for multiple years. Everyone will also receive a handout packet for help in identifying local mushrooms. Participants should bring their own lunch, and weather-appropriate clothing. It will be a day full of fungi, and FUN! Please call to reserve your spot (303-939-9403). $75 per person, 12 person maximum.
 

Sun, Jun 9 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HOME COMPOSTING 
with Mikl Brawner 

Learn how to turn waste into wealth by cultivating soil microorganisms. Nature does the work if you know how to lend a hand. In this class, you will learn what works in our climate, and what doesn’t. Mikl has been composting for 35 years. Class cost: $15
 


Sun, Jun 16 at 1 PM         
BERRIES & SMALL FRUITS FOR COLORADO 
with Mikl Brawner 

Small fruits are delicious, high in antioxidants, take up less space and bear sooner than trees: strawberries, currants, raspberries, grapes, gooseberries. Learn about the best varieties for Colorado and how to grow them. Class cost: $15.   (NOTE: This class was originally scheduled for Sunday, June 2 at 1 PM.)
 

Sat, Jun 22 at 10 AM           
BENEFICIAL INSECTS 
with Kristina Williams 

Not all insects will harm your garden; and in fact many insects are “good guys” that will not only control garden pests but also help your garden in other ways. Learn how to recognize and attract beneficial insects to your yard and garden. Class cost: $15

 

Sat, Jun 22, 1-2 PM        
HABITAT HERO – WILDSCAPING 101 (FREE!) 
with Laura Somers 

Laura Somers, Wildscape Ambassador, representing Audubon Rockies and Colorado Native Plant Society will demonstrate the importance of restoring our communities, one garden patch at a time. From a birds-eye view, learn how to create wildlife-friendly gardens that help combat the loss of open spaces and create green corridors that link your wildscape to larger natural areas by providing habitat for wildlife.  Free admission!
 

Sun, Jun 23 at 10 AM
COLORADO NATIVE BEES 
with Kristina Williams 

If you have a backyard garden, it’s probably being pollinated by some of Boulder County’s 500+ species of native bees. Kristina will talk about some of the basic types and how you can create bee friendly habitat to invite them to your yard. She will walk you through Harlequins’ demonstration gardens to observe some of these bees in action. An informative class by an experienced bee keeper!  Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jun 23 at 1 PM           
MANAGING GARDEN PESTS WITHOUT POISONS 
with Mikl Brawner     

Learn how to look for and identify common pests, and how to judge if anything needs to be done. Learn which organic solutions are the most effective, for what, and how to do it. Mikl has been walking this talk for 35 years. Class cost: $15

JULY

Sun, Jul 14 at 1 PM        
TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE 
with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience. Class cost: $15


 

Sat, Jul 20 at 10 AM       
HONEY BEE MEET & GREET 
with Kristina Williams 

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knothole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside? Come take a peek inside a working hive of honeybees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general. Please wear long sleeves and pants. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jul 20 at 1 PM         
BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
with Elaine Walker    

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jul 21 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS —  P. 1:  REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. This is a good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before. Class cost: $15

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.


AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




Referrals

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Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you soon! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


Get all the latest news from your friends at Harlequin’s Gardens.

The Pros and Cons of Late Season Snow

SNOW  or  SNOW  ??

At Harlequin’s Gardens we often tell customers that “Mid-May / Mother’s Day is our average last frost date.” The most important part of that sentence is “average”, and we remember a year when we experienced 23 degrees on May 24th. This week’s freezing temperatures and late-season snow were a surprise, presenting challenges and opportunities.  Challenges for the tender annuals and warm-season veggies that were recently planted (we hope that you were able to protect them with Solar Caps, Row Cover, or over-turned planting pots lined with bubble wrap).  Eve recommends our heavy duty tomato cages that really support the plants, and also can be used now to support tents of Row Cover or other fabric for quick protection from late snow or impending hail.  She especially likes the ‘inverted’ cages, which taper from a wide base to a smaller diameter top.  As a note, most annuals usually recover rapidly from snow breakage. 

If you recently purchased tender plants and haven’t yet planted them, it’s best to keep them comfy indoors and then begin hardening them off when the weather warms up again.  (See below for our Hardening Off Guidelines.)  But of course the snow and rain are providing much-valued moisture to our region, which is appreciated.  We can celebrate the wonderful delivery of free water!   Our native plants and those from similar regions, such as steppes (Siberia, Central Asia, etc.) are better at dealing with these weather events than non-regional tender.  

As a reminder from Arborist-Mikl, if you’re knocking the snow off of your shrubs, trees, etc, to be sure to do it by lifting the limbs from underneath as beating snow off from the top can cause branches to break.  If you do suffer a ragged branch break, give it a clean cut  as soon as you can.  

We have begun brewing compost tea, which is available by the gallon jug (bring your own or ‘rent’ ours for $1).  Compost tea is a great boost for struggling plants and to use on new plantings. 

While we have a Memorial Day weekend without classes, come June 1 and 2 we’re featuring three very informative classes beginning with co-presenters Kristina Williams and Mikl Brawner on the topic of “Japanese Beetles”, Saturday, June 1 at 10 AM.  Though it may seem early to begin thinking about this recent invader, NOW is the best time to begin building your defenses against them.  That afternoon at 1:00 PM, Kelly Grummons will introduce you to “Dog Tuff™ Grass”, a hardy, warm-season, sun-loving turf grass that requires just a fraction of the water of traditional turf grass, and only occasional mowing.   On Sunday, June 2 at 1:00 PM, Mikl presents his popular “Berries and Small Fruits for Colorado” class.  

Further class details are listed below and as always, please call to register:    303-939-9403 




OUR WARM-SEASON VEGGIE SELECTION IS HOT!

Our last shipment of tomatoes will arrive tomorrow – wow!  We will also be receiving more peppers and Genovese Basil.  Come on in to see what other surprises are arriving!  
Below are our current in-stock selections of tomatoes, peppers and eggplants.  In addition we have Toma Verde Tomatillo’s (remember, you need 2 for pollination!), Okra, and Ground Cherries available.

TOMATOES 

PLUS, all the varieties that will arrive tomorrow!



PEPPERS 



EGGPLANTS 

Black Beauty
Galine
Listada de Gandia
Long Purple
Paloma
Pingtung Long
Prosperosa
Rosa Bianca




HARDENING OFF GUIDELINES

Transitioning tender annuals, vegetable, and other plants, from a cushy greenhouse setting to the outdoors is essential to getting them established.  Hardening off means to gradually acclimate plants to outdoor conditions prior to planting.  Plants grown indoors or in a greenhouse are not accustomed to the wind, sun, and other conditions they will encounter outside, and could freeze, dry out, or burn.

To harden off your plants, begin 5-7 days before transplant date.  Place the plants in a sheltered, shady spot outdoors.  Leave them for about 2-3 hours the first day, then gradually increase the time spent outside by 2-3 hours each day.  By the third day, try to add several hours of morning sun to the outdoor time.

Bring the plants back indoors each night, or if the outdoor temperature is below 45 degrees.

After the 5-7 day period, your babies can be planted in the garden! Be aware of weather conditions, though, and be prepared to cover the plants if inclement weather (snow, high winds, or freezing temperatures) is expected.



OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

JUNE

Sat, Jun 1 at 10 AM          
JAPANESE BEETLES 
with Kristina Williams 

Our resident entomologist Kristina Williams will present the natural history of the Japanese Beetle so that you can better understand the pest you’re up against. Mikl Brawner will talk about the new products we are trying out at Harlequin’s Gardens, which are also available for purchase. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 1 at 1 PM          
DOG TUFF GRASS 
with Kelly Grummons 

Bring out the hammock! If you have a sunny yard and need a super low-water, low-maintenance, no-mow lawn that‘s short, lush, soft and green in summer, plant Dog Tuff™ African Dogtooth Grass instead of Kentucky Bluegrass!  Kelly Grummons has been working for over 20 years on techniques of growing this exciting, beautiful and extremely low-water turf grass. It was chosen as a PLANT SELECT variety and promoted across the US in 2016, and Dog Tuff™ is now available at Harlequin’s Gardens! In this class, Kelly will demonstrate the techniques for converting your thirsty lawn into one that requires just a fraction of the water. The low-profile, lush green turf is sure to become a staple in our region. By the way, Dog Tuff Grass is also surprisingly resistant to dog urine spots! Kelly Grummons is a horticulturist and owner of Prairie Storm Nursery, coldhardycactus.com, dogtuffgrass.com and Plantselect.org. Class cost: $20
 

Sun, Jun 2 at 1 PM         
BERRIES & SMALL FRUITS FOR COLORADO with Mikl Brawner 

Small fruits are delicious, high in antioxidants, take up less space and bear sooner than trees: strawberries, currants, raspberries, grapes, gooseberries. Learn about the best varieties for Colorado and how to grow them. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 8, 10 AM to 3 PM      
MUSHROOM CULTIVATION AND IDENTIFICATION HANDS-ON CLASS 
with Zach Hedstrom 

Mushrooms are delicious and healthy, but also shrouded in mystery! Learn more about them in this Mushroom Cultivation and Identification Workshop taught by mycology enthusiast Zach Hedstrom. Plan to leave the class with basic knowledge about how to grow mushrooms, the ways in which fungi can increase ecological vitality, as well as familiarity with the process of identification and various local wild mushroom species. Participants will partake in 2 hands-on mushroom growing activities and take away a log inoculated with Oyster Mushroom spawn that, with proper care, will produce tasty mushrooms for multiple years. Everyone will also receive a handout packet for help in identifying local mushrooms. Participants should bring their own lunch, and weather-appropriate clothing. It will be a day full of fungi, and FUN! Please call to reserve your spot by April 30th(303-939-9403). $75 per person, 12 person maximum.
 

Sun, Jun 9 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HOME COMPOSTING 
with Mikl Brawner 

Learn how to turn waste into wealth by cultivating soil microorganisms. Nature does the work if you know how to lend a hand. In this class, you will learn what works in our climate, and what doesn’t. Mikl has been composting for 35 years. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 22 at 10 AM           
BENEFICIAL INSECTS 
with Kristina Williams 

Not all insects will harm your garden; and in fact many insects are “good guys” that will not only control garden pests but also help your garden in other ways. Learn how to recognize and attract beneficial insects to your yard and garden. Class cost: $15

 

Sat, Jun 22, 1-2 PM        
HABITAT HERO – WILDSCAPING 101 (FREE!) 
with Laura Somers 

Laura Somers, Wildscape Ambassador, representing Audubon Rockies and Colorado Native Plant Society will demonstrate the importance of restoring our communities, one garden patch at a time. From a birds-eye view, learn how to create wildlife-friendly gardens that help combat the loss of open spaces and create green corridors that link your wildscape to larger natural areas by providing habitat for wildlife.  Free admission!
 

Sun, Jun 23 at 10 AM
COLORADO NATIVE BEES 
with Kristina Williams 

If you have a backyard garden, it’s probably being pollinated by some of Boulder County’s 500+ species of native bees. We’ll talk about some of the basic types and how you can create bee friendly habitat to invite them to your yard. Then we’ll walk through Harlequins’ demonstration gardens to observe some of these bees in action. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jun 23 at 1 PM           
MANAGING GARDEN PESTS WITHOUT POISONS 
with Mikl Brawner     

Learn how to look for and identify common pests, and how to judge if anything needs to be done. Learn which organic solutions are the most effective, for what, and how to do it. Mikl has been walking this talk for 35 years. Class cost: $15

JULY

Sun, Jul 14 at 1 PM        
TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE 
with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience. Class cost: $15


 

Sat, Jul 20 at 10 AM       
HONEY BEE MEET & GREET 
with Kristina Williams 

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knothole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside? Come take a peek inside a working hive of honeybees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general. Please wear long sleeves and pants. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jul 20 at 1 PM         
BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
with Elaine Walker    

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jul 21 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS —  P. 1:  REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. This is a good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before. Class cost: $15

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.


AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you soon! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

More Plants and Mother’s Day Special

More Plants Have Arrived!

Just in time for Mother’s Day!

Snowy days are perfect for planning your garden and Eve has put together an article onPlants For Pollinators that will help you attract bees, butterflies and other flying friends (below).

We just received a huge delivery of beautiful, neonic-free plants including Hostas, Peonies, Bleeding Hearts, and many more garden favorites. We also now have Dahlia tubers from our friends Julie and Kurt at Arrowhead Dahlias in Platteville, CO (see list below). Many of you have been waiting for the arrival of Hablitzia tamnoides (Caucasian Mountain Spinach). It’s here! Since this plant is a vigorous, viney perennial, remember to plant it in an area of your garden where you won’t have to dig it up. Next week, peppers will be arriving! Lastly, we have restocked our Solar Caps, horticultural vinegar, and worm castings.

Don’t forget, on Saturday, May 11th is a very special class on Vermicomposting with Fort Collin’s Worm

Master, John Anderson! John will discuss the many ways worms can save the planet and explain why and how you can create worm compost. Worms will be available for purchase at the class for $40, plus the class fee of $15. Please call to register: 303-939-9403.
On Mother’s Day (Sunday, May 12th), roses are 15% off (a maximum of 2 roses per person)!
Coming next week: peppers, blooming annuals, and more perennials!


Help wanted at Harlequin’s Wholesale 

Plant production: This is a Full-time position through the growing season, involving physical outdoor work five days a week thru October, possibly later. Duties include
planting, watering, weeding, and propagation of organic plants using NO toxic pesticides, and occasional diverse tasks as needed. An excellent opportunity for an all-weather, reliable, hard-working, detail-oriented, plant-loving person, and an excellent learning opportunity. Please direct inquiries and send your resume to wholesale@harlequinsgardens.com



Dahlias Have Arrived!

Here are the varieties we’re carrying this year:
Banana Split
NTAC Solar Flare
Valley Rustbucket
Miss Delilah
Symphony
Diva
Camano Buz
Hollyhill Black Beauty
Cornel
Hillcrest Amour
Ivanetti
Caitlyn’s Joy



Pollinator Plants for Vegetable (and other) Gardens:

Photo at left: Malus ‘Thunderchild’ flowering crabapple by Joe Winslow

As gardeners, we are in a position to take positive and meaningful steps in supporting our diminishing pollinators and other beneficial insects, as well as many other members of our intricately interdependent ecosystems. Urban gardeners can be she/heroes in their own back yards and neighborhoods by eliminating the use of chemical fertilizers, chemical pesticides, and chemical herbicides. Now that we are cleaning up our act, we can invite our friends in the natural world to feast on the pollen, nectar fruits and seeds they need to survive and thrive. And at the same time, we are helping our gardens and ourselves to survive and thrive. Everybody does better when everybody does better! Harlequin’s Gardens is here to supply the best safe seeds, plants, products, and information to help you, your garden, your neighborhood, and ultimately, your planet.

Here are some suggestions for plant families and some of their specific members you can plant in and around your vegetable and fruit gardens to make them healthy, thriving havens for you and your ecosystem friends. To learn more, sign up for

The Borage (Boraginaceae) family contains many familiar garden flowers and native wildflowers, some of which are favorites of bees. Most of them are spring-bloomers. Borage and Phacelia are two of the best-known members of the family, which also includes Forget-me-Not, Chiming Bells (Lords & Ladies), Comfrey, Jacob’s Ladder, Lungwort, Alkanet (Anchusa), Echium, Lithospermum, and others.

The best Phacelia for supporting bees is P. tanacetifolia (known as Bee’s Friend), an annual species that is very pretty, with lacy-looking foliage and many small light purple flowers that show off their stamens. The blooms are arranged in a fascinating, spiraling structure called a scorpioid cyme. It grows very easily from seed, blooms all spring and into the summer, and is visited not only by honeybees, but also at least a few smaller native bees here. If allowed to self-sow, you can have a patch for years – especially if you shake the ripe seeds around in new beds. Every plant species seems to use (and potentially deplete) its own particular nutrient palette, and if grown continually in the same place, the colony will often diminish. Also be sure to maintain a diverse gene-pool by allowing self-sowing by numerous different individuals in the colony.

Phacelia campanularia is a smaller annual, with larger flowers (3/4”) that are stunning true blue, held singly or in small clusters in mid-spring. It is very drought tolerant, hence its common name: Desert Bluebells, and looks amazing with California Poppies.

If it’s bees you want to support, Calamintha nepeta (Calamint) and Pycnanthemum pilosum (Hairy Mountain Mint) are some of the best nectar sources for them, and are said to produce some of the finest honey. Both are perennials.  Actually, any plant in the Mint family, Labiatae, will get lots of attention from bees. Our native Monarda fistulosa (Bee Balm) is wonderful, as are the various selections and hybrid varieties of Monarda

that bloom in pink, lavender, purple,

or red. Many of our common culinary and medicinal herbs are in the mint family – Thyme, Savory, Rosemary, Sage, Lavender, Oregano, Catnip, Marjoram, Lemon Balm, Prunella (Self-Heal), Horehound (Marrubium) and of course, many varieties of Mint. The nectar of these plants contains powerful phytochemicals that help protect bees against mites, parasites and pathogens. Popular ornamentals in this family include Catmint (Nepeta), Agastache (sometimes called Hyssop), Traditional Hyssop, Salvia, Dragon’s Head, Phlomis. Members of the Mint family can be blooming through much of the spring, summer and fall.

Another Herb and Vegetable family that supports many, many beneficial insects, is the Apiaceae family

notice that the family name refers directly to bees, though the primary pollinators of this group are hordes of tiny beneficials that help protect gardens from destructive insects. This family includes Parsley, Cilantro, Dill, Fennel, Celery, Lovage, Sweet Cecily, Chervil, Angelica, Queen Anne’s Lace, Carrot, Celeriac, Parsnip, and a long list of ornamental garden plants and natives. The family includes both highly edible and highly poisonous plants, so if you come upon a plant that looks anything like one of the familiar edibles when you are in the wilds, do not taste it until you have made an absolutely positive identification. One more thing –  most of the Apiaceae family herbs and veggies are harvested for their leaves, roots or stems and are not allowed to flower. I always leave my Parsley plants in the garden over the winter (they’re biennials), harvest some leaves in the spring and then let them put out their flowers (that look like small, light yellow Queen Anne’s Lace), which they will do for most of the summer. Then I allow them to self-sow. One year, some Parsnip roots escaped my attention and sprouted 2nd year foliage and flowers in my garden. They were gorgeous! 30 to 36-inch tall plants, with big flat heads of tiny, bright gold flowers, and bold tropical-looking foliage.

Many members of the Asteracea (Aster or Sunflower) family provide great mid-summer and autumn forage for honeybees, native bees, butterflies and other beneficial insects and pollinators. This is a huge, diverse and widely distributed family, including all the daisy-type flowers (Dandelion, Fleabane, Zinnia, Marigold, Jerusalem Artichoke, Shasta Daisy, Sunflower, Arnica, Echinacea, Gayfeather (Liatris), Gaillardia (Blanket Flower), Mexican Hat, Aster, Cosmos, Dahlia, Calendula, Chicory, Lettuce, Radicchio, Artemisia, Artichoke, Thistle, Gerbera, Chamomile, Yarrow, Ragweed, Goldenrod, Rabbitbrush, Black-eyed Susan, Coreopsis, and thousands more. Their seeds often provide important food for songbirds, as well.

Honeybees find my perennial ‘Rustic’ Arugula one of their top favorites in my garden. I always allow some of them to flower, sending up skinny bloom stalks up to 2 or 3’ tall for many months. They are always blooming, from late-spring to autumn frosts, with small bright yellow, 4-petaled (cruciform) flowers. If your Kale over-winters, it too will ‘bolt’ (start to flower) in its second spring. Other familiar members of this family, Brassicaceae,  include Cabbage, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Collards, Mustard, ‘Canola’ (Rapeseed), Mizuna, Watercress, Radish, Turnip, Kohlrabi, Rutabaga, Stock, Wallflower, Sweet Alyssum, Basket-of-Gold, Aubrieta and many other garden flowers and wildflowers. The vegetables on the list will only benefit pollinators if they are allowed to bloom.

The Onion family,Amaryllidaceae, is well-represented in most vegetable gardens, as well as ornamental gardens. Flowers in this family provide great nectar sources for bees of many species. The edible Onions, Leeks, Garlic, Shallots, and Scallions aren’t usually given a chance to bloom before harvest, but Chives, Garlic Chives, Altai Onion, Welsh Onion and Ramps are perennial, so you can have flowers and still get a crop. There are plenty of popular ornamental Onions (Alliums), most growing from bulbs, and natives in the family. Nodding Onion (Allium cernuum), which blooms in summer, is an eminently garden-worthy native. Many spring-blooming bulbs (Crocus, Glory-of-the-Snow, Snowdrops, Tulips, Foxtail Lily, Camas, Hyacinth, Grape Hyacinth, and many more) are in this and other closely-allied families, and provide important bee forage early in the season.

Legumes, such as Clovers, peas and beans are members of the Fabaceae family. Some, like garden peas and beans, are self-

pollinating, and don’t require the help of pollinating insects. But lots of others can be important pollinator-attractors for honeybees, bumblebees and butterflies. Some garden-worthy natives that bees and butterflies of various types will flock to include the shrubs Amorpha fruticosa, A. nana, and A. canescens (Leadplant), and herbaceous perennials Dalea purpurea (Purple Prairie Clover), Golden Banner, and Silver Lupine. In addition, clovers and vetches support many bees and other pollinators, and are excellent cover crops in gardens. Traditional ornamentals in the family include Redbud trees, Wisteria vines, False indigo (Baptisia australis and other species), and garden Lupines (L. polyphyllus hybrids).

The Rosaceae family includes most of the temperate-zone fruits and berries, all of which are bee-pollinated: Apples, Crabapples, Pears, Peaches, Cherries, Plums, Apricots, Nectarines, Strawberries, Raspberries, Serviceberries, Blackberries, and a number of hybrids involving raspberries and blackberries. Along with these, the ornamental versions of these trees and shrubs, especially Flowering Crabapple and several selections of small-fruited plums, are equally dependent on wild and domesticated bees for pollination, and in a good year, will bring the pollinators in large numbers when they bloom. Roses are also pollinated primarily by bees, and are often popular with them. Native shrubs and trees in this family include Apache Plume, Fernbush, Fendlerbush, Sandcherry, Serviceberry, Chokecherry, American Plum, Antelope Bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), Cliffrose (Purshia (Cowania) stansburyana).

A  few notable additions to this list are representatives of other plant families:

Asclepias speciosa (Showy Milkweed) – eagerly pollinated by bees and butterflies. Larval host to Monarch butterflies.
Ribes aureum (Golden Currant) – pollinated by Bumblebees
Mahonia aquifolium and M. repens – excellent early spring forage for bees
Cleome serrulata (Rocky Mt. Bee Plant) – a wonderful wildling for bees of many kinds
Larkspur and Delphinium (Consolida ajacis or regalis, and native or exotic Delphinium) great for Bumblebees
Buckwheats (Eriogonum species like native Sulphur Buckwheat, and many others, as well as cultivated Buckwheat, grown as a seed crop or as a cover crop, and excellent forage for bees.
Poppies of all kinds are eagerly pollinated by honeybees and some native bees
Cactus flowers are also heavily laden with pollen that brings bees of many kinds.
Globe Mallow species attract lots of honeybees



OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

MAY

Sat, May 11 at 1 PM           
VERMICOMPOSTINGwith John Anderson 

The many ways worms can save the planet – they are nature’s gift that keeps on giving! Worm Man, John Anderson, will explain why and how you can create worm compost. The hope and change we’ve been waiting for right under your feet!  Worms will be available for purchase at the class for $40, plus the class fee of $15.
 

Sat, May 18 at 10 AM        
GARDENING WITH FRIENDS: INVITING WILDLIFE INTO YOUR GARDEN THROUGH LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck 

Living in a garden humming with life is a joy! Share you yard with birds, butterflies, pollinators and more.  You’ll learn how to provide a home for all life (maybe not deer), and why insects are a gardener’s friend, not the enemy. We’ll discuss overall landscape design strategies, as well as detailed information on plants that provide wildlife habitat, including many native plants. Alison has been designing landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping. Class cost: $15. 
 

Sat, May 18 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HIGH-ALTITUDE LANDSCAPE GARDENING with Irene Shonle

Mountain gardening is a challenge, with the short growing season, cold winters, water rights issues, critters and more. In this class, Irene will talk about ways to work with these challenges, and will discuss a palette of good mountain-hardy perennials, shrubs and trees that are low-water and provide pollinator/bird benefits. Irene Shonle is the Director of CSU Extension in Gilpin County. She holds a PhD in Ecology from U. of Chicago. She teaches and writes about native plants all across the state and is very involved with the Native Plant Master Program. She gardens (mostly with natives) in the mountains at her home and in demo gardens outside the Extension Office. Class cost: $15
 

Sun, May 19 at 10 AM
Tomato Tutelage 
with Kelly Grummons: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO GROW GREAT TOMATOES!

This class takes the mystery out of growing good tomatoes in our area. You always hear “It’s a good tomato year” or “It’s a bad tomato year”. Learn how to make EVERY year a “good tomato year”! Kelly will discuss garden soil preparation, culture in the ground and in pots, nutrition, tomato pests and diseases. Learn about the best varieties to grow here and how to maximize your harvest. Kelly Grummons is a horticulturalist and tomato aficionado. Class Cost: $20
 

Sun, May 19 at 1 PM     
BEST FRUIT TREES FOR COLORADO 
with Mikl Brawner

Learn which varieties of fruit trees are successful here, which are not, and which are good flavored: Apples, Cherries, Plums, Pears, Peaches. Mikl’s first orchard was in 1976 and he will teach you how to care for your fruit trees. Class cost: $15
 

JUNE

Sat, Jun 1 at 10 AM          
JAPANESE BEETLES 
with Kristina Williams 

Our resident entomologist Kristina Williams will present the natural history of the Japanese Beetle so that you can better understand the pest you’re up against. Mikl Brawner will talk about the new products we are trying out at Harlequin’s Gardens, which are also available for purchase. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 1 at 1 PM          
DOG TUFF GRASS 
with Kelly Grummons 

Bring out the hammock! If you have a sunny yard and need a super low-water, low-maintenance, no-mow lawn that‘s short, lush, soft and green in summer, plant Dog Tuff™ African Dogtooth Grass instead of Kentucky Bluegrass!  Kelly Grummons has been working for over 20 years on techniques of growing this exciting, beautiful and extremely low-water turf grass. It was chosen as a PLANT SELECT variety and promoted across the US in 2016, and Dog Tuff™ is now available at Harlequin’s Gardens! In this class, Kelly will demonstrate the techniques for converting your thirsty lawn into one that requires just a fraction of the water. The low-profile, lush green turf is sure to become a staple in our region. By the way, Dog Tuff Grass is also surprisingly resistant to dog urine spots! Kelly Grummons is a horticulturist and owner of Prairie Storm Nursery, coldhardycactus.com, dogtuffgrass.com and Plantselect.org. Class cost: $20
 

Sun, Jun 2 at 1 PM         
BERRIES & SMALL FRUITS FOR COLORADO with Mikl Brawner 

Small fruits are delicious, high in antioxidants, take up less space and bear sooner than trees: strawberries, currants, raspberries, grapes, gooseberries. Learn about the best varieties for Colorado and how to grow them. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 8, 10 AM to 3 PM      
MUSHROOM CULTIVATION AND IDENTIFICATION HANDS-ON CLASS 
with Zach Hedstrom 

Mushrooms are delicious and healthy, but also shrouded in mystery! Learn more about them in this Mushroom Cultivation and Identification Workshop taught by mycology enthusiast Zach Hedstrom. Plan to leave the class with basic knowledge about how to grow mushrooms, the ways in which fungi can increase ecological vitality, as well as familiarity with the process of identification and various local wild mushroom species. Participants will partake in 2 hands-on mushroom growing activities and take away a log inoculated with Oyster Mushroom spawn that, with proper care, will produce tasty mushrooms for multiple years. Everyone will also receive a handout packet for help in identifying local mushrooms. Participants should bring their own lunch, and weather-appropriate clothing. It will be a day full of fungi, and FUN! Please call to reserve your spot by April 30th(303-939-9403). $75 per person, 12 person maximum.
 

Sun, Jun 9 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HOME COMPOSTING 
with Mikl Brawner 

Learn how to turn waste into wealth by cultivating soil microorganisms. Nature does the work if you know how to lend a hand. In this class, you will learn what works in our climate, and what doesn’t. Mikl has been composting for 35 years. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 22 at 10 AM           
BENEFICIAL INSECTS 
with Kristina Williams 

Not all insects will harm your garden; and in fact many insects are “good guys” that will not only control garden pests but also help your garden in other ways. Learn how to recognize and attract beneficial insects to your yard and garden. Class cost: $15

 

Sat, Jun 22, 1-2 PM        
HABITAT HERO – WILDSCAPING 101 (FREE!) 
with Laura Somers 

Laura Somers, Wildscape Ambassador, representing Audubon Rockies and Colorado Native Plant Society will demonstrate the importance of restoring our communities, one garden patch at a time. From a birds-eye view, learn how to create wildlife-friendly gardens that help combat the loss of open spaces and create green corridors that link your wildscape to larger natural areas by providing habitat for wildlife.  Free admission!
 

Sun, Jun 23 at 10 AM
COLORADO NATIVE BEES 
with Kristina Williams 

If you have a backyard garden, it’s probably being pollinated by some of Boulder County’s 500+ species of native bees. We’ll talk about some of the basic types and how you can create bee friendly habitat to invite them to your yard. Then we’ll walk through Harlequins’ demonstration gardens to observe some of these bees in action. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jun 23 at 1 PM           
MANAGING GARDEN PESTS WITHOUT POISONS 
with Mikl Brawner     

Learn how to look for and identify common pests, and how to judge if anything needs to be done. Learn which organic solutions are the most effective, for what, and how to do it. Mikl has been walking this talk for 35 years. Class cost: $15

JULY

Sun, Jul 14 at 1 PM        
TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE 
with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience. Class cost: $15


 

Sat, Jul 20 at 10 AM       
HONEY BEE MEET & GREET 
with Kristina Williams 

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knothole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside? Come take a peek inside a working hive of honeybees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general. Please wear long sleeves and pants. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jul 20 at 1 PM         
BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
with Elaine Walker    

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jul 21 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS —  P. 1:  REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. This is a good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before. Class cost: $15

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.


AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




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Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you at our May Day Sale and Celebration! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


Get all the latest news from your friends at Harlequin’s Gardens.
www.harlequinsgardens.com

May Day Sale & Celebration just a few days away!

MAY DAY SALE & CELEBRATION

JUST DAYS AWAY!

We’re stocking up for our May Dale Celebration and Sale which begins Monday, April 29!  The Sale will continue through May 5 and segues into our unique and delightful May Day Celebration on Saturday and Sunday, May 4 and 5.  Details about the sale and our May Day Celebration are below.  

In preparation we’ve received delivery upon delivery upon delivery from our propagators and suppliers!  We now have most of our tomato varieties in stock, an amazing selection of other veggies and culinary & medicinal herbs(including 4-packs of Nufar Genovese Basil!), and our annuals selection is growing.  Our hardy, own-root roses are available and ready to plant, including a new batch of roses in quart (4 ½”) pots, and we have lots and lots of neonic-free, pollinator-friendly perennials, natives, shrubs and trees in stock.  See below for some inventory listings.

To boost the success of your plants we also have a great selection of fertilizers, soil amendments and mulches.  

Grow your first, or your most successful ever veggie garden this year!  Our own Mimi Yanus will guide you in her very popular “Getting Started in Veggie Gardening” class this Saturday at 10 AM.  That afternoon at 1:00 Mikl will show you which shrubs should be pruned in the spring and how to do so in his “Spring Pruning Class”.

As our 

region becomes more arid, many people are choosing plants that require less water.  On Sunday at 10 AM Kelly Grummons, owner of Prairie Storm Nursery, will introduce you to “Dryer Plants for a New Landscape Era.”  Wind up the day with John Martin and Kayan Short of Stonebridge CSA Farm, class on “Growing Grapes on the Front Range” They will show how you can successfully grow table grapes and wine grapes on the Colorado Front Range. 

See below for more details and call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!


Help wanted at Harlequin’s Gardens

Doing plant production: planting, watering, weeding, and propagation of organic-no toxic pesticide plants. Physical outdoor work five days a week thru October, possibly later.   
Send your resume to staff@harlequinsgardens.com




Don’t Miss our May Day Plant Sale and Celebration! 

Historically, May Day is a festival of spring and flowers; an old-fashioned holiday that has been celebrated for many centuries, although it isn’t commonly celebrated any more in the modern US. This earth-based celebration is inspired by gratitude for fertility and set at a time when seeds sprout, plants begin growing and baby animals are born.  For Harlequin’s Gardens, this is not just a time to hold a sale, but rather a time to share a true celebration with you, our friends, with live music and dancers.

When Mikl was growing up in Iowa, it was customary for children to make small May Day Baskets out of paper and glue and fill them with flowers or candy.  After leaving the basket on a neighbor’s porch, he would ring their doorbell and run!  

A main-stay of our entertainment is the Maroon Bells Morris Dancers, who dance every May Day, come rain or shine, on behalf of fertility.  They dance all over the County, and have said that we, Harlequin’s Gardens, are their roots because we are an earth-based business connecting with the earth and growing things. 

A fun poem from the Maroon Bells Morris Dancers website colorfully explains more: 

We do it all day, we do it all night, 
because it is, a fertility rite! 
That and the beer. 
And it helps preserve a very old tradition, 
much like drinking beer. 
And it embarrasses our offspring, 
which we laugh about while drinking beer. 
And it’s more fun than aerobics, 
which means we can drink more beer. 
And it makes us attractive to the opposite sex, 
so we can drink beer together. 
And it’s a social activity, 
which includes drinking beer.

Schedule of Events

We have a many other wonderful entertainers joining us on Saturday and Sunday, May 4 and 5.  Our musicians, listed below, will provide great music to accompany your browsing. 


APRIL 29 thru MAY 5  

May Day Plant Sale

MAY 4 and 5

Annual May Day Celebration and Cinco de Mayo


SATURDAY, MAY 4 

10 AM: Maroon Bells Morris Dancers bring us fertility and merriment
11:30 AM: enjoy the duo Martian Acres playing classic pop and originals
1:30 PM: move to Bistro Marimba with the music of Zimbabwe

SUNDAY, MAY 5, CINCO DE MAYO

Light refreshments will be served
11:30 AM: Boulder Irish Sessionjig and reel with Boulder’s finest Irish tunes and songs!
1:00 PM: local harpist Margo Krimmel will treat us to the tunes of O’Carolan and other fine melodies
 



May Day Plant Sale beginning Monday, April 29! 

Our Store, Bee Barn, and Plant Shelves swill be full to bursting when you visit!   2019 Members will be eligible for a $10 discount on a $50 or more purchase of plants (excluding roses & fruit trees) during that time frame!

DEEP DISCOUNT PLANTS!

Not the dregs! These are wonderful, neonic-free plants in prime condition, ready for planting in your garden!

MEMBERSHIP

Memberships help Harlequin’s to do those extras that are so valuable to the community but that are not profitable, like: 5 demonstration gardens of Natives, low-water groundcovers, the New Western Garden etc; plus plastic pot recycling; plant and pest identification for customers; hand-outs on many subjects like pollinator plants, how to plant, what blooms in July etc; local seed collecting and propagation, and more.

If you like what we have been doing, please become a member and help us to do it better, and enjoy the benefits of membership.  For a $20 donation, you’ll receive membership for the current calendar year and the following benefits:

1)  Half-price Harlequin’s Class of your choice. (Restricted to regular $15 and $20 classes.)
2)  25% discount on books all year

3)  During the May Day Week get $10 off a $50 or more purchase of plants (excluding roses & fruit trees)
4)  During May Day Week, take 10% off roses (except quarts), then
5)  in August begin the fall sale a week early with 20% off most everything.

You can become a member anytime you are at the nursery, or mail a check for $20 to
Harlequin’s Gardens
4795 N.26th St.
Boulder, CO. 80301

We will put you in our Membership file. A membership is valid until the end of the calendar year.
THANK YOU TO ALL OUR MEMBERS!!!




TOMATO STARTS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE 

Below is our current listing of tomatoes.  Please see our website for descriptions. 



WARM-SEASON VEGGIES & HERB STARTS 

Nufar Basil
Okra ‘Jambalaya’
Okra ‘Stelley
Aunt Molly’s Ground Cherry

 



COOL-SEASON VEGGIE STARTS 

Artichoke
Arugula
Asian Greens
Beets
Broccoli
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Celeriac
Celery
Chard
Chinese Cabbage
Cilantro
Collards
Endive
Kohlrabi
Leeks
Onions
Perennial Spinach (Hablitzia tamnoides)

Radicchio
Spinach



ANNUALS 

Amaranth ‘Hopi Red Dye’
Calendula ‘Pacific Beauty’
California Poppy – 5 colors!
Datura meteloides
Datura ‘Purple Currant Swirl’
Desert Bluebells
Ammi majus 
Lobelia ‘Crystal Palace’
Marigold ‘Lemon Gem’
Marigold ‘Red Marietta’
Nasturtiums
Sage ‘Blue Monday’
Sage ‘Pink Sunday’
Sweet Alyssum ‘Oriental Nights’
Sweet Alyssum ‘Tiny Tim’

 



APRIL & MAY CLASS LIST

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

APRIL


Sat, Apr 27 at 10 AM       
GETTING STARTED IN VEGETABLE GARDENING with Mimi Yanus

If you are new to Colorado, new to vegetable gardening, or have been unhappy with the results of your earlier attempts, this class is for you. Learn from Mimi what you need to know to make your new organic vegetable garden successful and bountiful, even in Colorado conditions!  (Class repeated by popular demand!)  Class cost: $15

Sat, Apr 27 at 1 PM      
SPRING PRUNING with Mikl Brawner

There are shrubs that should not be pruned in the spring and there are shrubs, roses and vines that are best pruned in spring. Learn which to prune when, and how to prune for strength, beauty, and production of fruit and flowers. (Rescheduled from April 14.  This is not a repeat of the Fall Pruning Class.) Class cost: $15



Sun Apr 28 at 10 AM
DRYER PLANTS FOR A NEW LANDSCAPE ERA with Kelly Grummons

Many beautiful cacti, century plants (Agave spp.), yuccas, and their relatives thrive in our harsh climate. These plants look as good in the winter garden as they do in the summer. Kelly is well known for his work with these hardy plants and is expert at using them in the garden. We’ll discuss companion plants, soil preparation and garden construction. Kelly Grummons is an accomplished Horticulturist, one of our region’s most important plant breeders, and Owner of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.com and dogtuffgrass.com).  Class cost: $20
 

Sun Apr 28 at 1 PM      
GROWING GRAPES ON THE FRONT RANGE with John Martin

Thanks to recent development in grape varieties, you, too can successfully grow table grapes and wine grapes on the Colorado Front Range. This workshop will present an overview of varieties suitable for this region, considerations for site location, trellising options, pest protection measures, and a brush across two basic pruning techniques.  Whether you are interested in fruit or wine, let’s explore how the taste of your grapes and wineswill define this locality. John and his partner, Kayann Short, tend nine different varieties of grapes and make wine at their CSA farm, Stonebridge, in Longmont.  Class cost: $15
 


MAY

Sat, May 11 at 1 PM           
VERMICOMPOSTINGwith John Anderson 

The many ways worms can save the planet – they are nature’s gift that keeps on giving! Worm Man, John Anderson, will explain why and how you can create worm compost. The hope and change we’ve been waiting for right under your feet!  Worms will be available for purchase at the class for $40, plus the class fee of $15.  Call 303-939-9403 to pre-order worms by April 30th at a $5 discount.
 

Sat, May 18 at 10 AM        
GARDENING WITH FRIENDS: INVITING WILDLIFE INTO YOUR GARDEN THROUGH LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck 

Living in a garden humming with life is a joy! Share you yard with birds, butterflies, pollinators and more.  You’ll learn how to provide a home for all life (maybe not deer), and why insects are a gardener’s friend, not the enemy. We’ll discuss overall landscape design strategies, as well as detailed information on plants that provide wildlife habitat, including many native plants. Alison has been designing landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping. Class cost: $15. 

Sat, May 18 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HIGH-ALTITUDE LANDSCAPE GARDENING with Irene Shonle

Mountain gardening is a challenge, with the short growing season, cold winters, water rights issues, critters and more. In this class, Irene will talk about ways to work with these challenges, and will discuss a palette of good mountain-hardy perennials, shrubs and trees that are low-water and provide pollinator/bird benefits.Irene Shonle is the Director of CSU Extension in Gilpin County. She holds a PhD in Ecology from U. of Chicago. She teaches and writes about native plants all across the state and is very involved with the Native Plant Master Program. She gardens (mostly with natives) in the mountains at her home and in demo gardens outside the Extension Office. Class cost: $15
 

Sun, May 19 at 10 AM
Tomato Tutelage 
with Kelly Grummons: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO GROW GREAT TOMATOES!

This class takes the mystery out of growing good tomatoes in our area. You always hear “It’s a good tomato year” or “It’s a bad tomato year”. Learn how to make EVERY year a “good tomato year”! Kelly will discuss garden soil preparation, culture in the ground and in pots, nutrition, tomato pests and diseases. Learn about the best varieties to grow here and how to maximize your harvest. Kelly Grummons is a horticulturalist and tomato aficionado. Class Cost: $20
 

Sun, May 19 at 1 PM     
BEST FRUIT TREES FOR COLORADO 
with Mikl Brawner

Learn which varieties of fruit trees are successful here, which are not, and which are good flavored: Apples, Cherries, Plums, Pears, Peaches. Mikl’s first orchard was in 1976 and he will teach you how to care for your fruit trees. Class cost: $15
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you at our May Day Sale and Celebration! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

TOMATOES ARE ROLLING IN!

With a Solar Cap, it’s not too early to plant them
It’s veggie planting season and we’re stocked for you!  We have an abundant selection of cool season veggies (think, kale, chard, brassicas, etc.)  that are very keen to get into the soil!  We have four types of potato starts (see below), two types of asparagus (Jersey Knight and Purple Passion), and two remaining selections of onion starts (Copra and Walla Walla).  In addition, our Botanical Interests, Seed Savers, and Beauty Beyond Belief seeds have been restocked, including warm season seeds.   And, if that weren’t enough, our tomato starts have rolled in!  We’re excited about our selections this year and hope that you’ll stop by to get yours soon!  See below for information on early tomato planting.  

We also continue to receive abundant deliveries of fabulous pesticide-free, interesting and unique perennials!   As you clean-up your garden this spring, don’t let rose pruning intimidate you!  This Saturday at 1:00, Eve will demonstrate and discuss why and how to prune roses in a fearless and confident manner. It’s a very popular and valuable class!  See below for more details and call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!  

Another helpful spring tool is our new horticultural vinegar.  Green Gobbler is 20% acidity (versus the 2-3% acidity of white kitchen vinegar) and is an effective treatment for emerging and established weeds. Tough dandelions may need repeat application for best results.  Best of all, by using horticultural grade vinegar, you avoid the negative environmental impacts of products containing glyphosate. 

As of April 1 we’re now OPEN DAILY from 9 AM to 5 PM, and until 6 PM on Thursdays. 


Help wanted at Harlequin’s Gardens Doing plant production: planting, watering, weeding, and propagation of organic-no toxic pesticide plants. Physical outdoor work five days a week thru October, possibly later.   
Send your resume to staff@harlequinsgardens.com

 
CURRENT TOMATO AVAILABILITY  Below is our current listing of tomatoes.  Please see our website for descriptions. 

Anasazi
Aunt Gertie’s Gold
Azoychka
Black Cherry
Black from Tula (pictured right, top)
Black Prince
Black Sea Man
Burbank Slicing
Carbon
Cream Sausage
Everett’s Rusty Oxheart
Gardener’s Delight
Gold Medal
Gold Nugget
Honey Drop
Juliet
Kellogg’s Breakfast
Malachite Box
Paul Robeson
Pink Brandywine
San Marzano Redorta
Striped German
Stupice
Sungold hyb.
Super Sioux / Super Lakota
Super-Sweet 100 (pictured right, bottom) 
Thessaloniki
Weaver’s Black Brandywine
 
EARLY TOMATO PLANTING  If you want to get an early start on your tomatoes and other warm-season vegetables, it’s important to provide a warm and protected environment for them.  Here’s how you can get the best results. 
SOIL THERMOMETER  For just a few dollars, a soil thermometer can be one of your most valuable garden guides.  Soil temperatures directly affect plant growth, and different plants need different soil temperatures in which to thrive.  Tomatoes need a minimum soil temperature of 55+ Fahrenheit. Planting in cold soil can cause plants to be stunted and weak.
  SOLAR CAPS  Solar Caps are a vast improvement over the well-known Wall-o-Water, which are prone to collapsing and crushing your plants! Solar Caps have 8 wire legs that keep it firmly secured in place. Solar Caps don’t have all those seams to leak, and the only part that requires annual replacement is the very inexpensive customized plastic bag. We like to keep the Solar Caps on our vining tomatoes throughout the season to moderate soil temperatures. They can be used to get a head-start on Peppers, Eggplants, Squashes, Cucumbers and Melons, but should be removed from those shorter plants when temperatures allow.  Solar Caps also provide a sure way to protect your plants from cold temps and snow! 

Solar Caps consist of a sturdy, re-usable, welded galvanized steel wire frame over which you drape the water-filled plastic bag that comes with the kit.  By positioning the Solar Cap where your tomato (or other warm-season veggies) will be planted, in 5-7 days your soil will be warm enough for planting (55+ Fahrenheit).  Following planting, Solar Caps form a personal greenhouse for your veggies, which improves growth throughout the season.  We’ve had great success using them for many years and we usually start planting tomatoes around April 15.  Solar Caps should be used when planting tomatoes between Mid-April and Mid-May. 
  For mountain gardeners: After the tomato plant reaches the top of the solar cap, you can leave the solar cap in place and insert your tomato cage directly into the solar cap (even when using a container or Earth Box!), or place it around the Solar Cap.  This will allow your tomato to remain warmer during cool summer nights. 
 
POTATO STARTS  We still have a good selection of potoato starts including Kennebec, Mountain Rose, and Purple Majesty selections, all grown here in Colorado.*  We have selected these varieties because they all grow very successfully here.   See below and our website for descriptions.   KENNEBEC  (Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Kennebec is an excellent, widely adapted, medium to late, all-purpose, white potato, bred by the USDA in 1941. This fast-growing variety has high yields of round to oblong tubers with shallow eyes, buff skin and white flesh that maintain good quality in storage. Plants do best when planted at 8-10” spacing to avoid overly-large tubers. The ivory flesh is firm and starchy with minimal water content and offers a rich, earthy and nutty flavor. Excels as a frying potato (fries, hash browns, chips, etc.) and is well suited for baking, mashing or roasting. Kennebec potatoes keep their shape when cooked, perfect for potato salads, curries, soups, stews.Resistant to Potato Virus A and Potato Virus Y; moderate resistance to Potato Virus S, Potato Virus X, blackleg, and foliage late blight.  MOUNTAIN ROSE   (Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Red inside and out! Bred in & for Colorado. Excellent as potato chips, French fries, oven fries, and also great for baking, mashing, and potato salads. High in antioxidants!  Early to Mid-season. PURPLE MAJESTY (Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Uniform, high-yield, deep purple skin and flesh, very high in anthocyanins (high-potency antioxidant).  Bred in and for Colorado. They are delicious roasted, baked, sliced for home-made chips, mashed..

*Our seed potatoes this year are not certified organic. They ARE “Certified Seed”, which means they have been tested and found free of disease (late blight – think Ireland’s Potato Famine). Potatoes sold for eating are NOT tested or certified; that’s why we do not recommend planting potatoes from the grocery store or farmer’s market. Our seed potatoes have been grown the same way as their organic crop, with the addition of an application of sulfur.  Our supplier was unable to sell their certified organic seed potatoes this year for planting because they didn’t qualify as disease-free.   Potato Growing Instructions From our friend, Frank Hodge

Potatoes grow best in full sun.  Plant seed potatoes (pieces of potatoes or small whole potatoes – plant whole if they are smaller than a golf ball) with at least 2 eyes per piece. If you are cutting up the potatoes, do so ahead of time (couple hours to a day prior to planting) to give them a chance to form a protective layer for moisture retention and rot resistance.

Plant as soon as when soil can be easily worked.  Plants will begin to grow when the soil temperature reaches 45 degrees.  Plants can tolerate a light frost but be prepared to cover them if a hard frost is expected.

Spread and mix compost into the bottom of a 4-6” deep planting trench. Soil should be moist, but not water-logged.  Plant seed potatoes 4” deep, 1 foot apart, with the eye side up. Potatoes thrive in LOOSE, well drained soil with consistent moisture.  

When plants reach about 6” tall, cover them with light compost or straw until just the top inch or two still shows. Continue to cover the plants (called hilling) as they grow. This will result in a fairly significantly sized mound.  Harvest potatoes on a dry day. Soil should NOT be compacted, so digging should be easy, but be gentle so as not to puncture the tubers.  “New” (small) potatoes may be ready in early July.  Mature potatoes should be harvested 2-3 weeks after the vines die (usually late July / early August). Brush off any soil, and store them in a cool, dry, dark place (but not in the refrigerator).  Do not store potatoes with apples as the ethylene gas produced by the apples can cause your potatoes to spoil. Do not wash potatoes until right before use.
 
APRIL & MAY CLASS LIST Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat! Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  
  APRIL
Sat, Apr 20 at 1 PM      
FEARLESS ROSE PRUNING with Eve Brawner Eve will demonstrate and discuss why and how to prune roses in a fearless and confident manner. She will also discuss feeding, watering, etc. to maximize your success with growing roses. Wear long pants, long sleeves, gloves, and a hat and be prepared to be outside. Class cost: $15
 
Sat, Apr 27 at 10 AM       
GETTING STARTED IN VEGETABLE GARDENING with Mimi Yanus If you are new to Colorado, new to vegetable gardening, or have been unhappy with the results of your earlier attempts, this class is for you. Learn from Mimi what you need to know to make your new organic vegetable garden successful and bountiful, even in Colorado conditions!  (Class repeated by popular demand!)  Class cost: $15

  Sat, Apr 27 at 1 PM      
SPRING PRUNING with Mikl Brawner There are shrubs that should not be pruned in the spring and there are shrubs, roses and vines that are best pruned in spring. Learn which to prune when, and how to prune for strength, beauty, and production of fruit and flowers. (Rescheduled from April 14.  This is not a repeat of the Fall Pruning Class.) Class cost: $15

Sun Apr 28 at 10 AM
DRYER PLANTS FOR A NEW LANDSCAPE ERA with Kelly Grummons Many beautiful cacti, century plants (Agave spp.), yuccas, and their relatives thrive in our harsh climate. These plants look as good in the winter garden as they do in the summer. Kelly is well known for his work with these hardy plants and is expert at using them in the garden. We’ll discuss companion plants, soil preparation and garden construction. Kelly Grummons is a Horticulturist and Owner of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.com and dogtuffgrass.com).  Class cost: $20
  Sun Apr 28 at 1 PM      
GROWING GRAPES ON THE FRONT RANGE with John Martin Thanks to recent development in grape varieties, you, too can successfully grow table grapes and wine grapes on the Colorado Front Range. This workshop will present an overview of varieties suitable for this region, considerations for site location, trellising options, pest protection measures, and a brush across two basic pruning techniques.  Whether you are interested in fruit or wine, let’s explore how the taste of your grapes and wineswill define this locality. John and his partner, Kayann Short, tend nine different varieties of grapes and make wine at their CSA farm, Stonebridge, in Longmont.  Class cost: $15
  MAY Sat, May 11 at 1 PM           
VERMICOMPOSTINGwith John Anderson  The many ways worms can save the planet – they are nature’s gift that keeps on giving! Worm Man, John Anderson, will explain why and how you can create worm compost. The hope and change we’ve been waiting for right under your feet!  Worms will be available for purchase at the class for $40, plus the class fee of $15.  Call 303-939-9403 to pre-order worms by April 30th at a $5 discount.
  Sat, May 18 at 10 AM        
GARDENING WITH FRIENDS: INVITING WILDLIFE INTO YOUR GARDEN THROUGH LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck  Living in a garden humming with life is a joy! Share you yard with birds, butterflies, pollinators and more.  You’ll learn how to provide a home for all life (maybe not deer), and why insects are a gardener’s friend, not the enemy. We’ll discuss overall landscape design strategies, as well as detailed information on plants that provide wildlife habitat, including many native plants. Alison has been designing landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping. Class cost: $15.  Sat, May 18 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HIGH-ALTITUDE LANDSCAPE GARDENING with Irene Shonle Mountain gardening is a challenge, with the short growing season, cold winters, water rights issues, critters and more. In this class, Irene will talk about ways to work with these challenges, and will discuss a palette of good mountain-hardy perennials, shrubs and trees that are low-water and provide pollinator/bird benefits. Irene Shonle is the Director of CSU Extension in Gilpin County. She holds a PhD in Ecology from U. of Chicago. She teaches and writes about native plants all across the state and is very involved with the Native Plant Master Program. She gardens (mostly with natives) in the mountains at her home and in demo gardens outside the Extension Office. Class cost: $15
  Sun, May 19 at 10 AM
Tomato Tutelage 
with Kelly Grummons: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO GROW GREAT TOMATOES! This class takes the mystery out of growing good tomatoes in our area. You always hear “It’s a good tomato year” or “It’s a bad tomato year”. Learn how to make EVERY year a “good tomato year”! Kelly will discuss garden soil preparation, culture in the ground and in pots, nutrition, tomato pests and diseases. Learn about the best varieties to grow here and how to maximize your harvest. Kelly Grummons is a horticulturalist and tomato aficionado. Class Cost: $20
  Sun, May 19 at 1 PM     
BEST FRUIT TREES FOR COLORADO 
with Mikl Brawner Learn which varieties of fruit trees are successful here, which are not, and which are good flavored: Apples, Cherries, Plums, Pears, Peaches. Mikl’s first orchard was in 1976 and he will teach you how to care for your fruit trees. Class cost: $15
 
Referrals Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 
  Social Media Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos!   We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!  In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


Get all the latest news from your friends at Harlequin’s Gardens.
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Bundle Up Your Plants!

Spring snow is on it’s way!

This week will be a challenging one for gardeners; we will have night temperatures in the mid-20s Wednesday through Friday, before the next warming trend. We are also expecting snow and perhaps sleet.  There are a number of ways to protect your plants including row cover, solar caps, upside-down pots.  See below for details.  

As soon as you are able, take the opportunity to direct-sow seeds in the ground for hardy annuals, such as Phacelia campanularia (Desert Bluebells) – pictured right, Phacelia tanacetifolia (Bee’s Friend), Larkspurs, California Poppies, Sweet Alyssum, Sweet Peas, Bachelor’s Buttons, annual Poppies (Corn poppies, Shirley poppies, Lauren’s Grape, Bread-seed, Peony-flowered), Snapdragons, Cosmos, Love-in-a-Mist, Plains Coreopsis/Tickseed, and biennial Hollyhocks. These flowers are very easy to grow, and will provide plenty of color and lots of great forage for bees, butterflies and other beneficial insects through the season.  Our collection of Botanical Interests, Seed Savers, and Beauty Beyond Belief seeds are available for you to try these special plants.  And, Soil Thermometers will help you accurately gauge when to plant.  At this time of year our propagators are delivering almost 100 flats a week of fabulous pesticide-free, interesting and unique perennials!  And beginning later this week will receive our first few flats of tomatoes – WOW!  Next week more tomato varieties will arrive, and when the time is right, peppers, eggplants tomatillos, and lots of great annual pollinator-friendly flowers will arrive.  See our website for many of our veggie descriptions.  


Com

e inside to our classes this weekend.  Our friend and owner of Matrix Gardens, Alison Peck, has a doubleheader on Saturday at !0:00 beginning with “Edible Landscaping” where your learn how to beautifully grow fruits, nuts, veggies, and herbs in your yard.  Then at 1:00 she’ll show you how to easily set-up a drip irrigation system in “Do-it-Yourself Drip Irrigation”.

The great news is that Panayote Kelaidis’ of DBG fame, will teach “The Art & Science of Planting Drought-Tolerant Plants”.  The bad news is that the class has sold out!  We’re hoping that next year we can offer it in a larger venue.  Stay tuned! 

Later on Sunday at 1:00 Mikl will show us the intricacies of “Spring Pruning”, which is always a valuable thing to know about! 
See below for more details and call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

As of April 1 we’re now OPEN DAILY from 9 AM to 5 PM, and until 6 PM on Thursdays. 




POTATO STARTS 

…ARE IN THE HOUSE!  This year we have German Butterball, Kennebec, Mountain Rose, and Purple Majesty selections, all grown here in Colorado.*  We have selected these varieties because they all grow very successfully here.   See below and our website or descriptions.

GERMAN BUTTERBALL 

(Certified ‘seed’ potato) – (heirloom yellow)
German Butterball offers everything you could want in a potato: heirloom quality, deep golden flesh, and a delightfully mild flavor.  Versatile for every kind of preparation.  Best if harvested when small to medium sized. Superior storage.  Approximately 110 days to maturity. 

KENNEBEC 

(Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Kennebec is an excellent, widely adapted, medium to late, all-purpose, white potato, bred by the USDA in 1941. This fast-growing variety has high yields of round to oblong tubers with shallow eyes, buff skin and white flesh that maintain good quality in storage. Plants do best when planted at 8-10” spacing to avoid overly-large tubers. The ivory flesh is firm and starchy with minimal water content and offers a rich, earthy and nutty flavor. Excels as a frying potato (fries, hash browns, chips, etc.) and is well suited for baking, mashing or roasting. Kennebec potatoes keep their shape when cooked, perfect for potato salads, curries, soups, stews.Resistant to Potato Virus A and Potato Virus Y; moderate resistance to Potato Virus S, Potato Virus X, blackleg, and foliage late blight. 

MOUNTAIN ROSE  

(Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Red inside and out! Bred in & for Colorado. Excellent as potato chips, French fries, oven fries, and also great for baking, mashing, and potato salads. High in antioxidants!  Early to Mid-season.

PURPLE MAJESTY

(Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Uniform, high-yield, deep purple skin and flesh, very high in anthocyanins (high-potency antioxidant).  Bred in and for Colorado. They are delicious roasted, baked, sliced for home-made chips, mashed..

*Our seed potatoes this year are not certified organic. They ARE “Certified Seed”, which means they have been tested and found free of disease (late blight – think Ireland’s Potato Famine). Potatoes sold for eating are NOT tested or certified; that’s why we do not recommend planting potatoes from the grocery store or farmer’s market. Our seed potatoes have been grown the same way as their organic crop, with the addition of an application of sulfur.  Our supplier was unable to sell their certified organic seed potatoes this year for planting because they didn’t qualify as disease-free.

Potato Growing Instructions

From our friend, Frank Hodge

Potatoes grow best in full sun.  Plant seed potatoes (pieces of potatoes or small whole potatoes – plant whole if they are smaller than a golf ball) with at least 2 eyes per piece. If you are cutting up the potatoes, do so ahead of time (couple hours to a day prior to planting) to give them a chance to form a protective layer for moisture retention and rot resistance.

Plant as soon as when soil can be easily worked.  Plants will begin to grow when the soil temperature reaches 45 degrees.  Plants can tolerate a light frost but be prepared to cover them if a hard frost is expected.

Spread and mix compost into the bottom of a 4-6” deep planting trench. Soil should be moist, but not water-logged.  Plant seed potatoes 4” deep, 1 foot apart, with the eye side up. Potatoes thrive in LOOSE, well drained soil with consistent moisture.  

When plants reach about 6” tall, cover them with light compost or straw until just the top inch or two still shows. Continue to cover the plants (called hilling) as they grow. This will result in a fairly significantly sized mound.  Harvest potatoes on a dry day. Soil should NOT be compacted, so digging should be easy, but be gentle so as not to puncture the tubers.  “New” (small) potatoes may be ready in early July.  Mature potatoes should be harvested 2-3 weeks after the vines die (usually late July / early August). Brush off any soil, and store them in a cool, dry, dark place (but not in the refrigerator).  Do not store potatoes with apples as the ethylene gas produced by the apples can cause your potatoes to spoil. Do not wash potatoes until right before use.




GOOD NEWS SPECIAL EVENT!

This Saturday 3pm-6pm, next door to Harlequin’s at the Boulder Circus Center: FREE!

Come celebrate new opportunities in Local Food, and learn about and join with SOIL–Slow Opportunities for Investing Locally—which is providing interest-free loans to local farmers and food producers. Hear six brief presentations by local food leaders, then join in small group discussions. Enjoy live music, poetry, and

Harlequin’s Gardens is co-hosting this event because we believe in this heart-based, grass-roots, practical approach that can help support local food producers and increase local food security and food quality. It’s already working!

Neighbors, farmers, gardeners, citizen activists, the politically weary, the financially skeptical, the poetically inclined, pollinators, seed savers, CSA members, folks who want to know where their food comes from and where their money goes, and all who would like to put the culture back into agriculture and the civil back into civilization, all who would like to make our community healthier and our soil more fertile (which, as fate would have it, also pulls carbon out of the atmosphere, go figure!), all who take to heart the morning news reports about the collapse of insect populations and the urgency of climate change and who are no longer content to place all our bets on distant markets and distant political solutions. . .yes, you, us, we of Boulder, of the Front Range, of the environs between the Great Plains and the Continental Divide. . . we’re coming together to enjoy

—ADMISSION FREE—

. . .which could stand for Americans for Healthy Agriculture (AHA!), but doesn’t, because there is no such organization, but it stands for bunches of us coming together in a spirit of radical neighborliness, and for AHA! moments towards which we are heading, courtesy of these festivities, CO-HOSTED BY SOIL (Slow Opportunities for Investing Locally) and HARLEQUIN’S GARDENS, with help from our friends at Boulder County Farmers Markets, Savory Institute, Fresh Thymes Eatery, Organic Sandwich Company, Backpacker’s Pantry, Charlotte’s Web, and 78 individuals (on our way to many more, we trust) who have begun making 0% loans to local farmers and food enterprises, in the name of diversity and health, in the name of relationships putting transactions in their place, a small token of the esteem in which we hold those who are tending the soil and building the local food system. . .So, you are cordially invited to join in an afternoon of shared learning and community celebration, along with a few words from

and others, and. . . including poetry, music and other forms of cultural invigoration and mutual appreciation. Conviviality! Conversation! Door prizes! Radical neighborliness!

Who knew?! Something is afoot! AHA!

For more information contact woody@slowmoney.org.   
 




PROTECTING from FREEZING & SNOW

If you have marginally-hardy plants just emerging or recently planted, or are worried about snow crushing your plants (veggies, blooming bulbs, emerged perennials that aren’t cold hardy, such as lilies, etc.) then consider one of these methods to protect your valuable plants. 


ROW COVER

Row Cover gives you several degrees warmer temperature, protection from drying sun and wind for seed beds, tender seedlings and transplants, as well as protection from insects and birds. The fabrics can be “floated” over your rows or beds, using weights of various kinds to keep them in place, and can also be used to cover garden tunnel frames. When handled gently, these fabrics can last several seasons.   We have two types of Row Cover fabrics – Ensulate (1.5 lb.) and Seed Guard (.6 lb), both in pre-cut sheets or custom cut from our 12′-wide rolls.


SOLAR CAPS 

Solar Caps are a vast improvement over the well-known Wall-o-Water, which are prone to collapsing and crushing your plants! Solar Caps have 8 wire legs that keep it firmly secured in place. Solar Caps don’t have all those seams to leak, and the only part that requires annual replacement is the very inexpensive customized plastic bag. We like to keep the Solar Caps on our vining tomatoes throughout the season to moderate soil temperatures. They can be used to get a head-start on Peppers, Eggplants, Squashes, Cucumbers and Melons, but should be removed from those shorter plants when temperatures allow.  Solar Caps also provide a sure way to protect your plants from cold temps and snow!

Solar Caps consist of a sturdy, re-usable, welded galvanized steel wire frame over which you drape the water-filled plastic bag that comes with the kit.  By positioning the Solar Cap where your tomato (or other warm-season veggies) will be planted, in 5-7 days your soil will be warm enough for planting (55+ Fahrenheit).  Following planting, Solar Caps form a personal greenhouse for your veggies, which improves growth throughout the season.  We’ve had great success using them for many years and regularly plant our tomatoes by April 15.


UPSIDE DOWN POTS

Another way to protect your plants is to lightly wrap bubble wrap around your plant and then cover it with an overturned planting pot.  The bubble wrap will insulate the plant, while the pot will protect it from being crushed.  Be sure to remove the covering after the freezing temps have passed!






APRIL CLASS LIST

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete March Class listing below, or on our website.  



Sat, Apr 13 at 10 AM    
EDIBLE LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck

Learn how to grow fruits, nuts, vegetables, vines and herbs in your yard, beautifully. Learn which plants are the most successful and how to integrate them into your landscape. Alison has been designing edible landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Apr 13 at 1 PM      
DO-IT-YOURSELF DRIP IRRIGATIONwithAlison Peck

Drip Irrigation can be easy! Come learn a simple, easy way to design and install a system that can be connected to an outside hose bib with a battery-operated timer, giving you an inexpensive automatic watering system.  We will also discuss how to convert an existing sprinkler system to drip irrigation. Class cost: $15

Sun, Apr 14 at 10 AM
THE ART AND SCIENCE OF PLANTING DROUGHT-TOLERANT PLANTS
with Panayoti Kelaidis

SOLD OUT!  

Do you know what parts of the world your xeriscape plants come from? Whether they’re adapted to spring moisture, summer monsoons, or winter snow-cover? In what type of soil conditions they thrive? How to group plants with similar needs so they will all succeed? Don’t miss this rare opportunity for an enlightening explanation of the sets of growing conditions in which our Colorado-adapted garden plants evolved, including prairie, steppe, desert, foothill and montane, with an emphasis on steppes. Panayoti Kelaidis is Senior Curator and Director of Outreach at Denver Botanic Gardens, one of the world’s foremost botanical experts, an internationally acclaimed, inexhaustible and enthusiastic font of knowledge, passionate plant-explorer and gardener, a founder of the Plant Select program, and lead author of DBG’s groundbreaking book ‘Steppes’.  Class cost: $15

Sun, Apr 14 at 1 PM     
SPRING PRUNING with Mikl Brawner

There are shrubs that should not be pruned in the spring and there are shrubs, roses and vines that are best pruned in spring. Learn which to prune when, and how to prune for strength, beauty, and production of fruit and flowers. (This is not a repeat of the Fall Pruning Class.) Class cost: $15

 



Sat, Apr 20 at 1 PM      
FEARLESS ROSE PRUNING with Eve Brawner

Eve will demonstrate and discuss why and how to prune roses in a fearless and confident manner. She will also discuss feeding, watering, etc. to maximize your success with growing roses. Wear long pants, long sleeves, gloves, and a hat and be prepared to be outside. Class cost: $15
 

Sun Apr 28 at 10 AM
DRYER PLANTS FOR A NEW LANDSCAPE ERA with Kelly Grummons

Many beautiful cacti, century plants (Agave spp.), yuccas, and their relatives thrive in our harsh climate. These plants look as good in the winter garden as they do in the summer. Kelly is well known for his work with these hardy plants and is expert at using them in the garden. We’ll discuss companion plants, soil preparation and garden construction. Kelly Grummons is a Horticulturist and Owner of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.com and dogtuffgrass.com).  Class cost: $20
 

Sun Apr 28 at 1 PM      
GROWING GRAPES ON THE FRONT RANGE with John Martin

Thanks to recent development in grape varieties, you, too can successfully grow table grapes and wine grapes on the Colorado Front Range. This workshop will present an overview of varieties suitable for this region, considerations for site location, trellising options, pest protection measures, and a brush across two basic pruning techniques.  Whether you are interested in fruit or wine, let’s explore how the taste of your grapes and wineswill define this locality. John and his partner, Kayann Short, tend nine different varieties of grapes and make wine at their CSA farm, Stonebridge, in Longmont.  Class cost: $15
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you this week! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


Get all the latest news from your friends at Harlequin’s Gardens.
www.harlequinsgardens.com

Like Bundle-up Your Plants! on Facebook

Veggies, Seeds, Special Events, and Classes!

VEGGIES, SEEDS, SPECIAL EVENTS, & CLASSES!

So many opportunities this spring!

Harlequin’s Gardens offers a lot of exceptional and unusual varieties of veggies that you won’t find anywhere else!  Our selection of cool-season veggies continues to expand daily as do our perennials.  There are many veggies, including onions, leeks, Asian greens, bok choy, and heading type of brassicas (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage) that will yield larger and better results if they are planted sooner, rather than later in the season.  (Eve with Graffiti Cauliflower, right.)  See our website for many of our veggie descriptions.  

This is also the best time to get many types of seeds in the ground.  Our collection of Botanical Interests, Seed Savers, and Beauty Beyond Belief seeds contain many interesting and heirloom varieties for you to try.

If you’re unsure about the best ways to approach veggie gardening, or want to expand your knowledge, we have two classes this weekend that will be of great help.  On Saturday at 10 AM, our own Mimi Yanus will guide you in her popular “Getting Started in Veggie Gardening” class.  Then, at 1:00, Tracy Parrish follows with her “Succession Planting” class where you’ll learn how to maximize your garden space and keep your veggie garden in continual production. 

On Sunday at 1:00, Mikl will share how you can have a successful lawn without using toxic chemicals in his “Organic Lawn Care” class.   See below for more details and call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

As of April 1 we’re now OPEN DAILY from 9 AM to 5 PM, and until 6 PM on Thursdays. 




POTATO STARTS 

… will be arriving late next week!  This year we will have German Butterball, Kennebec, Mountain Rose, and Purple Majesty selections.  See our website for descriptions! 

 




GOOD NEWS SPECIAL EVENT!

Neighbors, farmers, gardeners, citizen activists, the politically weary, the financially skeptical, the poetically inclined, pollinators, seed savers, CSA members, folks who want to know where their food comes from and where their money goes, and all who would like to put the culture back into agriculture and the civil back into civilization, all who would like to make our community healthier and our soil more fertile (which, as fate would have it, also pulls carbon out of the atmosphere, go figure!), all who take to heart the morning news reports about the collapse of insect populations and the urgency of climate change and who are no longer content to place all our bets on distant markets and distant political solutions. . .yes, you, us, we of Boulder, of the Front Range, of the environs between the Great Plains and the Continental Divide. . . we’re coming together to enjoy

—ADMISSION FREE—

. . .which could stand for Americans for Healthy Agriculture (AHA!), but doesn’t, because there is no such organization, but it stands for bunches of us coming together in a spirit of radical neighborliness, and for AHA! moments towards which we are heading, courtesy of these festivities, CO-HOSTED BY SOIL (Slow Opportunities for Investing Locally) and HARLEQUIN’S GARDENS, with help from our friends at Boulder County Farmers Markets, Savory Institute, Fresh Thymes Eatery, Organic Sandwich Company, Backpacker’s Pantry, Charlotte’s Web, and 78 individuals (on our way to many more, we trust) who have begun making 0% loans to local farmers and food enterprises, in the name of diversity and health, in the name of relationships putting transactions in their place, a small token of the esteem in which we hold those who are tending the soil and building the local food system. . .So, you are cordially invited to join in an afternoon of shared learning and community celebration, along with a few words from

and others, and. . . including poetry, music and other forms of cultural invigoration and mutual appreciation. Conviviality! Conversation! Door prizes! Radical neighborliness!

Who knew?! Something is afoot! AHA!

For more information contact woody@slowmoney.org.   
 




BACKYARD VINEYARD CLASS

Have you dreamt of starting your own backyard vineyard?  Our friend, John Martin of Stonebridge Farm, will be teaching an introductory class this Sunday, April 7, from 1:00-4:00 at Stonebridge Farm. To attend email John Martin

Interested, but not able to attend?  Come to John’s Sunday, April 28 class at Harlequin’s Gardens: GROWING GRAPES ON THE FRONT RANGE at 1 PM.  In this class John will present an overview of varieties suitable for this region, considerations for site location, trellising options, pest protection measures, and a brush across two basic pruning techniques.  Call 303-939-9403 to register. 




APRIL CLASS LIST

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete March Class listing below, or on our website.  



Sat, Apr 6 at 10 AM       
GETTING STARTED IN VEGETABLE GARDENING with Mimi Yanus

If you are new to Colorado, new to vegetable gardening, or have been unhappy with the results of your earlier attempts, this class is for you. Learn from Mimi what you need to know to make your new organic vegetable garden successful and bountiful, even in Colorado conditions!  (This is a repeat of Mimi’s March 16 class.) Class cost: $15

Sat, Apr 6 at 1 PM
SUCCESSION PLANTING: OPTIMIZING PLANTING TIMES TO INCREASE GARDEN YIELDSwith Tracey Parrish   

Learn the techniques and timing to maximize your garden space and keep your veggie garden in continual production throughout the seasons. This class provides participants with an extensive planting schedule table, outlining when and where to start your seeds, the time to transplant out and when to expect harvest. Tracey is an expert in culinary gardening.  Class cost: $15
 

Sun, Apr 7 at 1 PM        
ORGANIC LAWN CARE with Mikl Brawner

You can have successful a lawn without using toxic chemicals! Learn how to support healthy soil and soil life using compost, organic fertilizers, aeration, proper watering, and mowing, and how to avoid and deal with weeds. Class cost: $15
 



Sat, Apr 13 at 10 AM    
EDIBLE LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck

Learn how to grow fruits, nuts, vegetables, vines and herbs in your yard, beautifully. Learn which plants are the most successful and how to integrate them into your landscape. Alison has been designing edible landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Apr 13 at 1 PM      
DO-IT-YOURSELF DRIP IRRIGATIONwithAlison Peck

Drip Irrigation can be easy! Come learn a simple, easy way to design and install a system that can be connected to an outside hose bib with a battery-operated timer, giving you an inexpensive automatic watering system.  We will also discuss how to convert an existing sprinkler system to drip irrigation. Class cost: $15

Sun, Apr 14 at 10 AM
THE ART AND SCIENCE OF PLANTING DROUGHT-TOLERANT PLANTS
with Panayoti Kelaidis

Do you know what parts of the world your xeriscape plants come from? Whether they’re adapted to spring moisture, summer monsoons, or winter snow-cover? In what type of soil conditions they thrive? How to group plants with similar needs so they will all succeed? Don’t miss this rare opportunity for an enlightening explanation of the sets of growing conditions in which our Colorado-adapted garden plants evolved, including prairie, steppe, desert, foothill and montane, with an emphasis on steppes. Panayoti Kelaidis is Senior Curator and Director of Outreach at Denver Botanic Gardens, one of the world’s foremost botanical experts, an internationally acclaimed, inexhaustible and enthusiastic font of knowledge, passionate plant-explorer and gardener, a founder of the Plant Select program, and lead author of DBG’s groundbreaking book ‘Steppes’.  Class cost: $15

Sun, Apr 14 at 1 PM     
SPRING PRUNING with Mikl Brawner

There are shrubs that should not be pruned in the spring and there are shrubs, roses and vines that are best pruned in spring. Learn which to prune when, and how to prune for strength, beauty, and production of fruit and flowers. (This is not a repeat of the Fall Pruning Class.) Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Apr 20 at 1 PM      
FEARLESS ROSE PRUNING with Eve Brawner

Eve will demonstrate and discuss why and how to prune roses in a fearless and confident manner. She will also discuss feeding, watering, etc. to maximize your success with growing roses. Wear long pants, long sleeves, gloves, and a hat and be prepared to be outside. Class cost: $15
 

Sun Apr 28 at 10 AM
DRYER PLANTS FOR A NEW LANDSCAPE ERA with Kelly Grummons

Many beautiful cacti, century plants (Agave spp.), yuccas, and their relatives thrive in our harsh climate. These plants look as good in the winter garden as they do in the summer. Kelly is well known for his work with these hardy plants and is expert at using them in the garden. We’ll discuss companion plants, soil preparation and garden construction. Kelly Grummons is a Horticulturist and Owner of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.com and dogtuffgrass.com).  Class cost: $20
 

Sun Apr 28 at 1 PM      
GROWING GRAPES ON THE FRONT RANGE with John Martin

Thanks to recent development in grape varieties, you, too can successfully grow table grapes and wine grapes on the Colorado Front Range. This workshop will present an overview of varieties suitable for this region, considerations for site location, trellising options, pest protection measures, and a brush across two basic pruning techniques.  Whether you are interested in fruit or wine, let’s explore how the taste of your grapes and wineswill define this locality. John and his partner, Kayann Short, tend nine different varieties of grapes and make wine at their CSA farm, Stonebridge, in Longmont.  Class cost: $15
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you this week! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

WELCOME TO HARLEQUIN’S GARDENS SPRING NEWSLETTER!


Dear Friends and Fellow Gardeners,

Welcome to Spring, to Harlequin’s Gardens and to another chance to get your hands into the living earth and add healthy biology to your micobiome, and breathe fresh air and hear the birds and partner with Nature in gardening.

With some notable exceptions, we humans have seen ourselves as separate and superior to the animals, plants and insects. We have seen ourrole as users, not partners. And now with our atmosphere polluted with greenhouse gases and our soils, ground water, streams and oceans contaminated with toxins and plastics, we humans are going “whoops!” Of course there are enormous economic interests and habitual patterns that are resisting the changes that are necessary.

Rationally, it appears that we are stuck in the Dark Ages, but intuitively, it feels like there is a Renaissance emerging. This Renaissance is dependent on a greater humility and a broader awareness. It is being driven by climate disruption, the food revolution, the soil revolution and a view merging new physics with ecology and social justice.

Realizations are arising that we really are all connected. American power plants are affecting islands in the South Pacific. Poisoning insect pests is killing billions of insect and microbial allies, which leads to greater pest problems. And basing our economy on oil and arms sales is backfiring with climate crises and displaced people needing new places to live.    

Read More


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Veggie Starts
Receive Newsletters by Email
Some Good News!
Events, Sales and Hours
Classes
Membership
Staff
Soil Life Products
Home-grown Fruit
Roses
Perennials
Trees & Seeds
Thank you!


VEGGIE STARTS

As usual we will have a great selection of organic veggie starts.  Every winter Eve pores over the most interesting and reliable seed catalogs, searching for new and special varieties that resist disease and pests, are very productive, taste fabulous, and that we think will likely be successful and rewarding here on the high plains and in the mountains. We think you’ll find the very best choices at Harlequin’s Gardens.  

Please give us your feedback on what you grow from us.  We want to know what works and what doesn’t.Please go to our website under Plants/Edibles for a complete listing and descriptions of our veggies.



A FEW of our NEW TOMATOES:

Offering 80+ varieties in 2019

THORBURN’S TERRA COTTA Tomato – NEW!  Very Limited Supply.  ~75 days, Heirloom, Indeterminate 
Our friend Thomas brought this very rare and completely unique tomato to our 2018 Taste of Tomato public tasting (where this remarkable new-old variety took second place in the Slicers category) and we’d never seen anything like it! Incredible color, flavor and history! Introduced in 1893, this sensational tomato has glossy/waxy terracotta brown skin, orange-pink flesh, and green seed mass. When cooked, it will yield a beautiful pumpkin-orange sauce with a floral aroma. (Pictured left.) 

BRAD’S ATOMIC GRAPE Tomato – NEW!Very Limited Supply~75 days, OP, Indeterminate
Highly productive, open, vining plants with wispy foliage. Large, pointy grape tomatoes are  borne in large clusters. Every fruit appears hand-painted! Lavender and purple stripes, orange turning to technicolor olive-green, red, and brown/blue stripes when fully ripe. Flavor? They came in second place after Sungold in the Cherry tomato category at our 2018 Taste of Tomato!  Fruits  are crack-resistant and exceptionally sweet.

TOMMY TOE cherry tomato – NEW!~70 days, Heirloom OP, Indeterminate
Tommy Toe is a great old heirloom from the Ozark Mountains that produces huge numbers of large, 1.5 oz red cherries with old fashioned flavor reminiscent of heirloom ‘beefsteak’ tomatoes. 

Read More about ALL of our Veggies



RECEIVE NEWSLETTERS BY EMAIL

Please subscribe to receive our newsletters by email. You can get both hardcopy and emails. Receive our weekly blogs with timely garden advice and reminders, as well as news of stock arrivals, upcoming classes, special events and sales, etc.  Our blog is a way we can give you detailed and up-to-date information at the time when it is relevant. We’re very happy to give you a hard copy newsletter when you visit the nursery or continue to mail it to you if you prefer.

Go to our subscription page and please remember to add us to your Contact List so your email server doesn’t throw us in the trash.

FACEBOOK :We wish you could LOVE us on Facebook, but since that’s not possible, we hope you will LIKE us…  


The miracle is not to walk on water, but to walk on earth Thich Nhat Hanh

One of the least discussed but, I suspect, most effective agents in the race to save ourselves from extinction is reconnecting to nature. When I hug a tree, I get a tiny, blessed glimpse of the truth, which is that I’m a very small part of a gigantic ecosystem

Maeve Higgins

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HEAR YE, HEAR YE: Some Good News!

Here is an invitation to a FREE event that celebrates various awakenings in local food, farmer support, turning carbon into fertility, saving the insects and the planet, and more – are happening locally. With brief talks by local activators, music, poetry, conviviality and conversation.

Please Join Us: 

Saturday, April 13, from 3 – 6 PM

at The Boulder Circus Center  
(4747 N 26th Street, next door to Harlequin’s Gardens)


—  FREE! — 
 

A collaboration of SOIL (Slow Opportunities for Investing Locally) and Harlequin’s Gardens.  For more details go to SOIL.

We can drift along with general opinion and tradition, or we can throw ourselves upon the guidance of the soul and steer courageously toward truth.

Helen Keller

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EVENTS, SALES & HOURS

On March 1 we opened for the Season and through the month are open Thursday through Sunday, 9-5.
Beginning April 1 we will be open everyday 9-5; Thursdays 9-6.
April 29 thru May 5: Harlequin’s Gardens May Day Plant Sale.
April 28 thru May 5: Harlequin’s Gardens Annual May Day Celebration and Cinco de Mayo.
On Saturday, May 4 at 10 AM don’t miss the Maroon Bells Morris Dancers who will bring us fertility and merriment. Then at 11:30 enjoy the duo Martian Acres playing classic pop and originals, and then at 1:30 move to Bistro Marimba with the music of Zimbabwe.
On Sunday, May 5, Cinco de Mayo, refreshments will be served, and from 11:00 jig and reel with the excellent musicians of the Boulder Irish Session. Then at 1pm local harpist Margo Krimmel will treat us to the tunes of O’Carolan and other fine melodies
August 19 to 25:  Members Fall Plant Sale
August 26: Harlequin’s Annual Fall Plant Sale begins for everyone. This sale continues every week in September and October.
September 7: Taste of Tomato: a tomato tasting festival; Harlequin’s Gardens with Growing Gardens, 10 AM-1 PM at Growing Gardens.  Bring your favorites; call/see our website for details.
October: open every day 9-5, and our Sale continues.  Closed for the Season on October 31.
November 29: Harlequin’s 2019 Holiday Market begins on GreenFriday with Local Artisan Goods and Goodies and will continue every Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday through December 22nd.

In nature’s economy, the currency is not money; it is life.”

Vandanna Shiva

The World Bank says it will no longer finance oil and gas projects after 2019.  

The Sierra Club

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HARLEQUIN’S GARDENS 2019 CLASSES

In our classes you will learn more than information. Our teachers are people who have spent years honing their skills and their experience in Colorado will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 unless otherwise stated to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. (Cash and check are much appreciated!)  Pre-register at 303-939-9403 for these classes both in case they fill up or too few people register and we have to cancel the class. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. Classes are also listed here.

MARCH

Sun, Mar 31 at 10 AM      BUILDING TOPSOIL and FERTILITY with Mikl Brawner
Mikl will discuss how to support soil life, enrich poor soils, and improve plant health and nutrition from the bottom up: composts, fertilizers, mulching, worms, deficiencies, and tilth. (Rescheduled from March 24.)  Class cost: $15


APRIL

Sat, Apr 6 at 10 AM       GETTING STARTED IN VEGETABLE GARDENING with Mimi Yanus
If you are new to Colorado, new to vegetable gardening, or have been unhappy with the results of your earlier attempts, this class is for you. Learn from Mimi what you need to know to make your new organic vegetable garden successful and bountiful, even in Colorado conditions!  Class cost: $15

Sat, Apr 6 at 1 PM         SUCCESSION PLANTING: OPTIMIZING PLANTING TIMES TO INCREASE YIELDSwith Tracey Parrish   
Learn the techniques and timing to maximize your garden space and keep your veggie garden in continual production throughout the seasons. This class provides participants with an extensive planting schedule table, outlining when and where to start your seeds, the time to transplant out and when to expect harvest. Tracey is an expert in culinary gardening.  Class cost: $15

Sun, Apr 7 at 1 PM         ORGANIC LAWN CARE with Mikl Brawner
You can have successful lawn without using toxic chemicals! Learn how to support healthy soil and soil life using compost, organic fertilizers, aeration, proper watering, and mowing, and how to avoid and deal with weeds. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Apr 13 at 10 AM     EDIBLE LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck
Learn how to grow fruits, nuts, vegetables, vines and herbs in your yard, beautifully. Learn which plants are the most successful and how to integrate them into your landscape. Alison has been designing edible landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping. Class cost: $15  

Read More
 



MEMBERSHIP in HARLEQUIN’S GARDENS

Memberships help Harlequin’s to do those extras that are so valuable to the community but that are not profitable, like: 5 demonstration gardens of Natives, low-water groundcovers, the New Western Garden etc; plus plastic pot recycling; plant and pest identification for customers; hand-outs on many subjects like pollinator plants, how to plant, what blooms in July etc; local seed collecting and propagation, and more.

Please become a member to support what we do, and receive special benefits too.  Here is our expanded current offer: Members will give us $20 for a one year membership and in direct return will receive these benefits:

1)  Half-price Harlequin’s Class of your choice. (Restricted to regular $15 and $20 classes.)
2)  25% discount on books all year
3)  During the May Day Week get $10 off a $50 or more purchase of plants (except roses & fruit trees)
4)  During May Day Week, take 10% off roses (except quarts), then
5)  in August begin the fall sale a week early with 20% off most everything.

You can become a member anytime you are at the nursery, or mail a check for $20 to
Harlequin’s Gardens
4795 N.26th St.
Boulder, CO. 80301

We will put you in our Membership file. A membership is valid until the end of the calendar year.  THANK YOU TO ALL OUR MEMBERS!!!

“No one has ever become poor by giving.”

Anne Frank

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OUR STAFF

We are very proud of our staff, so to help you to get to know us and our specialties, here are our portraits.

REBECCA WATERHOUSE is our excellent office manager who grew up on her family’s hobby farm in Oregon. She has become quite knowledgeable about plants and is indispensable around the nursery.  Rebecca is integral to the success of our operations! 




KRISTINA WILLIAMS has been a beekeeper for over 21 years and is our local expert on native bees. She is the current President of the Boulder County Beekeepers Assoc., is a trained entomologist and will be available to help people with beekeeping questions and beekeeping equipment.


ELAINE WALKER has a degree in landscape architecture with an emphasis in ecological practices. She has her own landscape design practice, and her recent work includes designing outdoor living spaces, retaining & boulder walls, native and drought tolerant plantings.  Elaine develops and publishes our weekly blogs and maintains our customer database.

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SOIL LIFE PRODUCTS

Very Special Products To Benefit Your Soil Life and Your Plant Life

Big Foot Mycorrhizae – NEW! – combines 4 species of mycorrhizae with biochar, worm castings, seaweed and rock minerals to provide a strong population of plant allies to bring water and nutrients.  
Endo Mycorrhizae – water soluble symbiotic fungus, innoculate roots to bring water and nutrients. 
Biodynamic Compost Starter – speeds decomposition, adds nitrogen bacteria, helps make humus, improves mineral availability; for compost piles, manure, leaves; 55 microorganisms.
Biodynamic Field and Garden Spray – speeds the breakdown of cover crops or sheet mulch; planting can be 2-3 weeks after spraying & turning under, 55 microorganisms.


COMPOSTS:

Organic Mushroom Compost – from a local organic mushroom farm. Premium food for soil life and wonderful in vegetable gardens, helps to loosen heavy soils and improve aeration and porosity.  

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HOME-GROWN FRUIT

One of our specialties is fruiting plants that are adapted to Colorado conditions. All the apples we carry are resistant to fireblight and good-tasting. And the cherries we sell are all proven successful in Colorado. Our grapes are the most hardy of any you will find, delicious fresh, in juice and a few are good for wine. And we have productive & good tasting currants, gooseberries, blackberries, strawberries, raspberries including:

Crandall Clove Currant and Gwen’s Buffalo Currant – both are 5’x4’ with very fragrant yellow flowers in spring and annual bearing of sweet-tart berries full of healthy phytonutrients and reddish fall color; these are native currants selected for better fruit. (photo, right)
Triple Crown Thornless Blackberry – late blooming so avoids late frosts, medium to large very sweet berries, semi-trailing, best pruned to 8’.  

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ROSES

We are known far and wide for our selection of sustainable roses and for our expertise in helping people choose the best varieties for their gardens and landscapes. We sell roses on their own roots not grafted, which makes them more cold hardy, longer lived, with more flowers.

This year we will have more Austin English roses. And

we have many other great roses including Bill Reid, Marie Pavie, The Gift, John Cabot, Seafoam, Stanwell Perpetual, The Fawn, Abraham Darby, Applejack,Darlow’s Enigma, Henry Kelsey, John Davis, Golden Wings, Victorian Memory, Fairmont Proserpine, Joann’s Pink Perpetual, Golden Celebration, Champlain, Morden Snowbeauty, Henry Kelsey, Robusta, etc.

See our 2019 Rose List on our website.

SHRUBS: We have a large selection of natives and non-natives AND Vines!

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PERENNIALS

Harlequin’s huge choice of pollinator-supporting perennials-including:

Sulfur Flower-Kannah Creek – mahogany fall color (Pictured right)
Eriogonum allennii – 3’ wide, very xeric, yellow flowers, a winner
E. jamesii – silver foliage, light yellow flowers, local native
Eriogonum umbellatum – yellow blooms cover xeric native mat, feeds butterflies, bees
Many Lavenders – Royal Velvet, Buena Vista, Grosso, Twickle Purple, Munstead, Hidcote
Asclepias incarnata – 1’-3’ Full Sun, Attracts butterflies, native & honeybees, butterflies
Asclepias tuberosa – Butterfly Weed, orange flowers, 1’-2’ high, Monarch food and nectar  

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TREES

The trees we sell are smaller than ball & burlap trees that are dug in the field, leaving at least 75% of their roots in the ground. Ours are grown in a container so they have a complete root system and begin growing immediately and are not stressed. Here is a sample of some of ours.

Russian Hawthorn –  very tough and xeric, grows 15’ high and wide, white flowers and red berries, loves CO. (photo, left)
Rocky Mt. Maple – a native of our foothills, likes to grow in the protection of other trees, red fall color, 10’-15’.
Gambel Oak and Wavyleaf Oak – both natives that grow 10’-15’, with little water and poor soil, support birds.  

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THANK YOU!

Thank you, local gardeners, for helping to cultivate a healthy 21st Century World!

Sincerely,

Mikl Brawner & Eve Reshetnik-Brawner
And the Great Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

“There is no passion to be found in playing small—in settling for a life that is less than the one we are capable of living. As we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.”

Nelson Mandela

Additional Mason Bee Class

Additional Mason Bee Class by Popular Demand!

Call today to reserve your spot!

We’ve had such a popular response to our two Mason Beekeeping classes with Tom Theobald, that’s he’s agreed to add a third class next weekend!  On Saturday, March 23 at 10:00 AM, Tom will discuss the importance of native bees and the roll they play in pollinating our early crops.  You will also have the opportunity to purchase Mason Bee Straws (see details below as this must be done in advance.)

Tom’s class will be followed at 1:00 by Kristina Williams’ class on “Get Equipped for BeeKeeping”, which is Free!  Kristina will share how to build strong frames, and give a our of our Bee Barn.  A great combination with Tom’s class!  

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Sat, Mar 23 at 10 AM
Mason Beekeeping with Tom Theobald  

The importance of our native ‘solitary’ bee species to the pollination of our crops, flowers, and native plants is receiving increased attention. For over 30 years, Tom Theobald of Niwot Honey Farm has been propagating one of the most ‘useful’ species, Mason Bees (Blue Orchard Bees), and will teach how to attract and care for these gentle native pollinators. Mason Bees are not a replacement for honeybees, but they are excellent pollinators of the early fruits – cherries, apples, etc.  They stay close to home, don’t sting, don’t require the year-round commitment of a colony of honeybees and provide a great way to introduce children to the world of pollinators. Harlequin’s Gardens will have filled straws (containing male and female adult bees in hibernation) for sale for $12 a straw. 

IMPORTANT: You must RESERVE your Mason Bee straws IN ADVANCE by calling Harlequin’s Gardens at 303-939-9403. Pre-payment of mason bee straws is required. Class cost: $15.  (Note: this class is a repeat of Tom’s March 2 class.) 

Sat, Mar 23 at 1 PM 
Get Equipped for Beekeeping with Kristina Williams  

For beginning and established beekeepers, alike!  Kristina will demonstrate how to build and crosswire frames. Learn the lingo of beekeeping supplies and take a tour of our Bee Barn. Harlequin’s Gardens is upgrading frames and foundation to be as strong as they can be and still use beeswax. Our resident entomologist and Bee Barn Babe, Kristina Williams, will share her vast knowledge with you!  Free Admission!   (Photo credit, right: Red Hot Pepper) 

See our complete list of classes on our website.  




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!  Throughout the month of March we’ll be open four days a week from 9 AM to 5 PM on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.
In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

Cool-Season Veggies are Here!


With asparagus and onions arriving soon!

Now that our cool-season veggies have begun to arrive (see list below) it feels like spring will be here very soon! We are also stocked with seeds for early spring crops (see list below).  We look forward to having you stop by to see them. 

When planting in the early season, it’s important to have a few extra tools on hand.  Soil Thermometers will help you accurately gauge when to plant.  

Row Cover gives you a few degrees warmer temperature, protection from drying sun and wind for seed beds, tender seedlings and transplants, as well as protection from insects and birds. The fabrics can be “floated” over your rows or beds, using weights of various kinds to keep them in place, and can also be used to cover garden tunnel frames. When handled gently, these fabrics can last several seasons.   We have two types of Row Cover fabrics – Ensulate (1.5 lb.) and Seed Guard (.6 lb), both in pre-cut sheets or custom cut from our 12′-wide rolls.

With the aid of Row-Cover fabric, you can plant our Broccoli, Aspabroc, Broccoli Raab, Cauliflower and Cabbage starts EARLY!  Eve has always had her best crops of spring-planted Broccoli and Cauliflower from starts set out in mid-March with protection. For heading Brassicas like these, you could also recycle 1-gallon water jugs, cutting out the bottoms and uncapping the tops, then setting them over the newly planted starts and pressing them into the soil just enough to keep them standing.  You can put the caps on at night, but don’t forget to remove the caps before your plants cook in the sun. 
  We continue to be open four days a week from 9 AM to 5 PM on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays during the month of March.   Starting Monday, April 1, we’ll be OPEN DAILY! 

CLASSES

This weekend we’re again featuring three great classes.  In keeping with the arrival of our cool-season veggies, Mimi Yanus conducts her ever-popular “Getting Started in Veggie Gardening” class on Saturday at 10:00.  (Mimi will repeat this class on April 6.)   

It’s not too late to get your Mason Bee straws!  At 1:00 on Saturday, Tom Theobald hosts a repeat of his earlier “Mason Beekeeping” class. 

On Sunday at 1:00Kirk Fieseler of Laporte Avenue Nursery in Fort Collins, will share valuable knowledge about propagating and growing evergreens in Colorado (which can be challenging!) in his Dwarf Conifers for Gardens and Landscapes” class.  

 See below for more details and call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!




COOL-SEASON VEGGIES 

Our organic, neonic-free cool-season veggie crops are rolling in!  Our early arrivals include:

  • All Seasons Cabbage
  • Tuscan / Lacinato / Dinosaur Kale (it’s known by many names)
  • Bull’s Blood Beet Greens
  • Spigariello Leaf Broccoli
  • Rapini (Broccoli Raab)

Stay tuned for updated descriptions for this year’s descriptions for Tomato, Pepper, and Eggplant starts, on our website



ONIONS 

Our onion plants are en route and will be arriving later this week. We’ll have Copra, Redwing, and Walla Walla in bundles.

We are also growing Ailsa Craig, Cippolini Bianco di Maggio, and Red Long of Tropea in pots, and they will be ready very soon. 
 



ASPARAGUS CROWNS

Also arriving later this week are Asparagus Crowns.  This year we will have both Jersey Knight and Purple Passion Asparagus Crown selections.  
 


SEEDS 

We have early spring crop seeds including tatsoi, pak choi, mustards, mizuna, radish, kohlrabi, Chinese cabbage, pea, arugula, spinach, carrots, parsley, parsnip, onions, scallions, chervil, fava beans, and hardy annual flowers like California Poppies, California Bluebells, Sweet Alyssum, Bee’s Friend (Phacelia tanacetifolia), Larkspur, Shirley Poppies, Sweet Peas, perennial native Blue Flax, and more.

When the soil has warmed enough, peas can be planted. We recommend pre-sprouting them indoors, and carefully planting the sprouted seeds, sprinkled with legume inoculant (which we have), in soil has warmed up to at least 40 degrees F.  Peas can be planted through April.  We have seeds for Shelling Peas, Snow Peas, and Sugar Pod or Snap peasHere’s some great local advice on growing peas.
 




COVER CROP SEEDS – NEW! 

We’ve expanded our offerings of cover crops to better meet your gardening needs.  Late winter / early spring is a great time to sow cover crops! 

  • Fall / Winter Cover Crop Mix
  • Spring / Summer Cover Crop Mix
  • Ephraim Crested Wheatgrass
  • Blue Grama
  • Hairy Vetch
  • Red Clover
  • Austrian Winter Peas
  • Daikon Radish
  • Dwarf Essex Rapeseed
  • Annual Sunflower
  • Quatro Sheep Fescue
  • Morgan Spring Oats (organic)
  • Spring Triticale
  • Buckwheat (organic)
  • Organic Spring Cover Crop Mix
  • Harlequin’s Gardens Mountain Native Mix
  • Harlequin’s Gardens Foothills native Mix
  • Harlequin’s Gardens Xeric Mix



MARCH CLASS LIST

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete March Class listing below, or on our website.  


Sat, Mar 16 at 10 AM
Getting Started in Vegetable Gardening with Mimi Yanus  

If you are new to Colorado, new to vegetable gardening, or have been unhappy with the results of your earlier attempts, this class is for you. Learn from Mimi what you need to know to make your new organic vegetable garden successful and bountiful, even in Colorado conditions!  Class cost: $15.  (This class will be repeated on Saturday, April 6th at 10 AM.) 
 

Sat, Mar 16 at 1 PM
Mason Beekeeping with Tom Theobald  

The importance of our native ‘solitary’ bee species to the pollination of our crops, flowers, and native plants is receiving increased attention. For over 30 years, Tom Theobald of Niwot Honey Farm has been propagating one of the most ‘useful’ species, Mason Bees (Blue Orchard Bees), and will teach how to attract and care for these gentle native pollinators. Mason Bees are not a replacement for honeybees, but they are excellent pollinators of the early fruits – cherries, apples, etc.  They stay close to home, don’t sting, don’t require the year-round commitment of a colony of honeybees and provide a great way to introduce children to the world of pollinators. Harlequin’s Gardens will have filled straws (containing male and female adult bees in hibernation) for sale for $12 a straw. 
IMPORTANT: You must RESERVE your Mason Bee straws IN ADVANCE by calling Harlequin’s Gardens at 303-939-9403. Pre-payment of mason bee straws is required. Class cost: $15.  (Note: this class is a repeat of Tom’s March 2 class.) 
 

Sun, Mar 17 at 1 PM
Dwarf Conifers for Gardens and Landscapes with Kirk Fieseler  

A renowned expert in conifers at Laporte Avenue Nursery in Fort Collins, Kirk Fieseler will discuss dwarf conifers for small landscapes and rock gardens. Learn the origins and propagation techniques for dwarf conifers as well as how to grow them in containers and in the garden. Kirk will talk about the most successful species for our climate and soils. Class cost: $15.  (Pictured right: Farmy, P. edulis. Photo by Kirk Fieseler.)
 



Wed, Mar 20 – First Day of Spring  

Sat, Mar 23 at 1 PM 
Get Equipped for Beekeeping with Kristina Williams  

For beginning and established beekeepers, alike!  Kristina will demonstrate how to build and crosswire frames. Learn the lingo of beekeeping supplies and take a tour of our Bee Barn. Harlequin’s Gardens is upgrading frames and foundation to be as strong as they can be and still use beeswax. Our resident entomologist and Bee Barn Babe, Kristina Williams, will share her vast knowledge with you!  Free Admission!   (Photo credit, right: Red Hot Pepper) 
 

Sun, Mar 24 at 1 PM
Building Topsoil & Fertility with Mikl Brawner  

Mikl will discuss how to support soil life, enrich poor soils, and improve plant health and nutrition from the bottom up: composts, fertilizers, mulching, worms, deficiencies, and tilth. Class cost: $15
 

Sun, Mar 31 at 1 PM
Cold Hardy Cacti and Succulents with Kelly Grummons  

We are proud to present acclaimed CO horticulturist Kelly Grummons, director of Prairie Storm Nursery, a business that includes ColdHardyCactus.com and DogTuffGrass.com!  An expert in selection and propagation of rare and unique plants for Colorado, Kelly will discuss a variety of exceptional new winter hardy cacti, agaves, yuccas, and outdoor succulents, and include choosing appropriate sites, soil prep, fertilizing, and ongoing care. Class cost: $20.   (Photo credit, left: ColdHardCactus.com) 
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you this week!  In March we are open every Thursday-Sunday, 9-5. In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens