Amazing Ornamental Grasses for your Garden

Ornamental grasses provide texture, movement, and seasonal color to gardens and thrive in our Colorado conditions.  Below Eve describes the three main types of grasses and gives detailed descriptions of Harlequin’s Gardens’ stock of ornamental grasses. 

This is the time to give your tomatoes, and other warm-season veggies, a boost of fertilizer.  But before you do so, read below about the specific type of fertilizer you should utilize!

This Sunday Hazel Dell mushroom grower, Zach Hedstrom, will lead a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains for the second part of his Foraging for Rocky Mountain Mushrooms class.  Registration and pre-payment of $15 are required.    
Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!




TOMATO FERTILIZING

Now is this time to give your tomato plants a fertilizer boost to help them produce more and better full-size tomatoes.  Utilize a low nitrogen, high phosphorous and potassium fertilizer that is organic and slow release.  This will help provide energy to your plant for fruit production versus green leafy material.  Our friend and masterful gardener, Frank Hodge, says ” ALL flowering plants, flowers and vegetables alike, need more phosphorus and potassium, and less nitrogen in order to make better, bigger, and more blossoms.  You may double the number of blossoms on your plants just by adding these nutrients every other week.”

Some of the ideal fertilizers we offer for this include Age Old Bloom (5-10-5), Age Old Fruit Finish (2-10-20), and Neptune Harvest Rose & Flowering Formula (2-6-4).




FULL-TIME OFFICE MANAGER position

Harlequin’s Gardens is looking for a positive, creative, flexible, tech-savvy person with excellent skills in communication and team-work to start soon.  Duties include data entry, social media, bill-paying, label and sign-making, advertising and promotion, supply orders, staff and customer support. Must be able to work at least one weekend day. Ideally, the candidate should be physically fit, able to lift 40 lbs, and have some familiarity with plants and gardening.  This is a full-time, year-round position.

Please send your resume to Staff@HarlequinsGardens.com



ORNAMENTAL GRASSES

Ornamental Grasses are great companion plants and there are lots of great reasons to use them in your garden or landscape: They are dynamic, moving in the wind and playing with light; they can take the place of a shrub, especially in a narrow planting bed and along pathways. Taller grasses are good for screening in narrow spaces. Grasses enhance any wildlife-oriented, native or naturalistic landscape. Some are suitable in more formal plantings as well. Grasses are great for disguising utility boxes. Deer generally don’t eat them.  Come by to take a look at our selection of ornamental grasses and those established in our display gardens!

Harlequin’s Gardens sells “Clump Grasses” (not spreading or sod-forming). Here Eve explains the distinguishing features of Cool Season, Warm Season, and Evergreen grasses, and gives great descriptions of the most well-known of these grasses.

Cool Season:

Already up a

nd green by March and make active growth in cool weather until it gets hot. They can be kept green through summer by watering, but otherwise they go dormant until the fall, when some of them may begin growing again. Most bloom in June, but a few wait until late summer. Because they begin growing so early in the year, they are subject to being demolished by rabbits. People with resident rabbit populations should choose Warm Season grasses instead. Cut grasses back to 2-3” inches tall before they start their active growth, so light can penetrate the entire clump. Eve does this in February.

Warm Season:

Most people grow warm season grasses in this area. Many of our native grasses, and many of the most popular grasses for our area are Warm Season grasses. Wait until early April to cut back warm season grasses. Cut as low as you can, ideally 2-3”, so light can penetrate into the entire clump.

Evergreen:

Remain mostly green through the year. Do not cut back. To clean them up in spring, gently ‘comb’ out old dry blades with a hand rake.


COOL SEASON GRASSES

Calamagrostis acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’s’ (Karl Foerster’s Feather Reed Grass)

The most popular and over-used ornamental grass, for good reason. Medium sized (to 4’ tall), very erect form, easy to grow and highly adaptable to everything but shade, very durable flower/seed heads remain attractive all summer, fall and winter. No fall foliage color. Cut down in early February. Try to avoid plantings that look like rows of soldiers standing at attention! Hardy to Zone 4.  In stock now! 

Calamagrostis brachytricha (Korean Feather Reed Grass)

To 3’ or 4’ tall, with a graceful fountain-like or mounded shape, and waits until the end of the summer to flower. Can take some shade. Very pretty, with pinkish plumes that dry tan. No fall color. Plant Select. Should be used more. Hardy to Zone 4. (Photo credit: Plant Select.) 

Festuca glauca, F. thurberi (Blue Fescue)

Evergreen. This year we carry F. glauca ‘Boulder Blue’, a 10”-tall selection with very blue foliage, good form, hardiness, longevity and drought-tolerance. We also have F. ovina “Sea Urchin”, smaller, finer texture, good for rock gardens or Asian-style gardens, and Festuca thurberi, which is native from 5,000’ to 10,000’ elevation and is nearly evergreen, to 12” tall. Hardy to Zone 4. (Photo credit: High Country Gardens.)   In stock now!

Helictotrichon sempervirens (Blue Oat or Avena Grass)

 A much sought-after modest-sized evergreen grass with powder-blue blades, and that has some shade tolerance. It forms an open, symmetrical mound of foliage from 12” to 24” high, and a bit wider. Bloom stalks add another 12 to 18”, and provide interest for several months. Hardy to Zone 4. (Photo credit: High Country Gardens.)  In stock now! 

Hierochloe odorata (Vanilla Sweetgrass, Fragrant Holy Grass)

Vanilla Sweet Grass is an aromatic, cool-season perennial growing 10-24” tall, blooming in June to July, and spreading about 2 feet per year by underground rhizomes. The natural range of Sweet Grass is Greenland to Alaska, south to New Jersey, the Midwest, and Arizona, in zones 3 to 7. Its natural habitat is wetlands, prairies, and savannas in wet to medium moisture soils. A sacred grass in Native American ceremonies, Sweet Grass is braided and burned as a ‘smudge’ to purify body and soul and invite the presence of good spirits. The glossy green leaves have a pleasant vanilla fragrance. Because of its aggressive, rhizomatous nature it can be difficult to eliminate if it has spread to areas where it is not wanted. Though Sweet Grass prefers rich, moist soils, it will grow in almost any soil that receives a minimum of a half day of sun. Sandy, well-drained sites will require mulch and watering during times of low rainfall. Add compost to sand or clay soils. The preferred pH range is 6 to 8. (Photo credit: Prairie Moon Nursery.)  In stock now!

Koeleria macrantha (June Grass)

Native! This lovely small green clump grass has attractive dense, compact seed heads starting in, you guessed it, June.  Good for prairie and foothills gardens. Hardy to Zone 3 to 4 and tolerant of full sun or part shade, low to moderate watering. (Photo credit: Prairie Moon Nursery.)  In stock soon! 

Nasella (Stipa) tenuissima (Mexican Feather Grass)

Also known as Ponytail Grass, this small grass, to 14” tall, has very fine-textured blades that make a ‘fountain’ of green. It can sometimes be evergreen. This grass is not very long-lived. Most cool season grasses don’t self-sow much, but Nasella does, a lot. Hardy to Zone 5.  In stock now!

Oryzopsis hymenoides (Indian Rice Grass)

Native! Up to 2’ tall. Native to Boulder County and much of the interior West. Grows in very dry areas, in full sun. Graceful, open clumps of very narrow blades, and delicately branched flowering stalks in June. Small pearl-like white seeds are held individually on the much-branched stalks and were collected by Native Americans for use as a grain. Also, an important food source for wildlife. Old seed germinates better than new seed. Needs supplemental summer watering if you want to keep it from going dormant. Excellent meadow grass, perfect in native xeriscapes. Hardy to Zone 3. (Photo credit: Native Foods Nursery.)  In stock now! 

COOL SEASON SEDGES

We also carry two types of grass-like sedge that are also cool-season:

Carex appalachica (Appalachian Sedge)

A small fountain-like clumping sedge, 10”- 2’ tall, very fine-textured, bright light green and very attractive. Native to woods in Eastern N. America, it grows well in dry shade or part shade. It mixes well with perennials and serves as a neat groundcover or edger. Its tenacious roots will prevent erosion on shady slopes, and it can grow amongst tree roots. Blooms in spring, supporting beneficial insects. Hardy to Zone 4. In stock now!

Carex caryophllea ‘Beatlemania’ (‘Beatlemania’ Variegated Vernal Sedge)

This petite sedge is rhizomatous and spreads. Its long glossy blades are slightly variegated yellow and green, and curve to the ground, giving it a mop-headed look. Makes an excellent groundcover or small ‘lawn’ (just to look at, not to step on) in shady gardens, especially Asian-styled gardens. Almost evergreen. Hardy to Zone 5.  


WARM SEASON GRASSES

Achnatherum calamagrostis UNDAUNTED® Alpine Plume Grass (Alpine Plume Grass)

Alpine plume grass is a spectacular long-lived grass from high mountain meadows in central and southern Europe. A mature plant makes a dramatic specimen, with several dozen flower heads waving above a graceful fountain of fresh green foliage. The flowers persist from summer until the following spring when the entire plant should be cut back to make room for the new season’s growth. Unlike many other ornamental grasses, the foliage doesn’t die out in the clump’s center over time. (Photo and description credit: Plant Select.)  In stock now!

Andropogon gerardii (Big Bluestem)

Native!  Big Bluestem is taller and has a wider blade than Little Bluestem and is somewhat upright but also arching. It also has attractive reddish and purple fall colors. Big Bluestem is one of the dominant components of the Tallgrass Prairies across the Great Plains, where it can reach 8’ in height. Here it can range from 2 to 5’ tall, depending on water and nutrients available. We carry the wild species, and the selection introduced by Plant Select, called ‘Windwalker’ (Photo credit: Plant Select), which has an upright habit, exceptionally blue foliage, and in late summer turns deep red and purple fall colors that persist into winter. In late summer, Big Bluestem has purplish red flowers appear in groups of three or six, which look like a turkey foot – hence the nickname: “Turkey Foot Grass”. The root system can extend down more than 10 feet. Each year, a third of these roots die, opening up channels for water. This plant is drought tolerant once it’s established. Attracts birds and butterfly larvae. Plant in Full Sun. Hardy to Zone 4.  In stock now!

Andropogon (Schizachyrium) scoparium (Little Bluestem)

Native! Little Bluestem is very erect to 24”-30” with fine foliage and blooms in late summer-early fall. Blooms turn white and catch the early morning and late afternoon sun beautifully when back-lit. The foliage turns copper and looks good for a long time. Very drought-tolerant. Selections ‘The Blues’ and ‘Prairie Blues’ have very blue foliage during the growing season. ‘Blaze’ is a colorful selection of the common native in this region. Hardy to Zone 3.  (Photo credit: High Country Gardens.)  In stock now!

Bothriochloa scoparium, syn. B. laguroides (Silver Beard Grass)

Native! Silver Beardgrass is a native perennial clump-grass with fuzzy, light-gathering, white fruiting heads atop tall, slender, stiff stems and narrow blades. At first glance it looks like foxtail grass, but up close you see that instead of the flower head being compact and spike-like, as in the foxtails, it’s a narrow, branched panicle. It occurs along roads, in spots in fields of Big Bluestem, on the rocky slopes of hills, and it’s a very tough grass specializing in dry, open places from South America to Colorado. It’s not flamboyant-looking until those slender, white heads catch the back-lighting sun in late summer; then they are very eye-catching. (Photo credit: Wildflower.org.)  In stock now!

Bouteloua gracilis (Blue Grama) and Bouteloua curtipendula (Side-Oats Grama)

are both native and very drought tolerant. There’s a selection of Blue Grama called ‘Blonde Ambition’ that is taller and has pale tan ‘eyelashes’ rather than the common gray-brown. One can make a drought-tolerant lawn of Blue Grama with some effort (weeding for the first several years) which will be green in summer, brown in winter. Hardy to Zone 3. Blue Grama is our State grass! Side-Oats Grama is a smaller meadow grass. Seed heads and foliage turn a beautiful dark purple-red in fall. Hardy to Zone 3. (Photo credit: Plant Select.)  In stock now!

Chasmanthium latifolium (Northern Sea Oats, River Oats)

A US native, though not native here, this grass grows well in part shade. The wide, bright green blades emerge from the stems at many heights, giving it a slightly bamboo-like look. The pendulous seed clusters in late summer are composed of very attractive flat, plaited spikelets, starting out pale green, later turning tan. Foliage stays green until fall, when it turns yellow. It will self-sow but is easy to recognize and not difficult to control. Hardy to Zone 3.  (Photo Credit: Tagawa Gardens.)  In stock soon!

Eragrostis trichodes (Sand Love Grass)

Native! This medium-sized grass, to 2-3’ x 2-3’, loves to grow in sandy soil as its name suggests, but adapts to many soils with low to moderate moisture. It is effective in masses and can be an excellent component of a meadow. Reddish tones begin to show in late summer, and the haze of tiny purple-pink seeds in late summer are beautiful. Sand Love Grass tends to rot in the center as it gets older, and self-sows readily. Plant in full sun. Hardy to Zone 5. (Photo Credit: Pawnee Buttes Seeds Inc.)  In stock now!

Muhlenbergia reverchonii ‘Undaunted’ (‘Undaunted’ Ruby Muhly Grass)

A Plant Select winner that is hardy here, but not at higher elevations. It is native to Oklahoma and Texas and is said to grow where there’s water (one common name is ‘Seep Muhly’), yet some horticulturists here recommend growing it pretty dry. When well-grown, it makes a beautiful and graceful 2’ x 3’ mound of fine mid-green blades covered in late summer by a shimmering haze of tiny pink/red flowers, then reddish seeds. Hardy to Zone 5. (Photo credit: Plant Select.)  In stock now!
We also offer the native Muhlenbergia montana (Mountain Muhly), which will grow in moderate to dry conditions, with a less dense display of seedheads than Ruby Muhly Grass. Mountain muhly is a strongly tufted perennial grass, 8-20 in. tall, with loose, narrow panicles and light-green. leaves.  In stock now!

Panicum virgatum (Switch Grass)

Native!  Switchgrass was an important component of the Tallgrass Prairie. It tolerates a wide range of soils, including dry ones, but prefers moist soils that are not too rich in nitrogen, and grows best in full sun. Here it grows to about 3’ tall and wide, topped in midsummer by a finely-textured pinkish flower panicles that hover over the foliage like an airy cloud. Seed plumes turn beige and persist well into winter, providing an excellent seed source for birds. Fall foliage color is yellow. Salt-tolerant. “Heavy Metal” variety is more upright and has steely blue foliage. ‘Shenandoah’ is the most popular variety for red foliage accents, with red coloration appearing in summer and increasing in fall. Hardy to Zone 2. (Photo Credit: Tagawa Gardens.)  In stock now!

Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Hameln’ (Hameln Dwarf Fountain Grass)

‘Hameln’ is a smaller and hardier variety of fountain grass with three distinctive seasons of attractive displays. Green, fine-textured grass blades up to 2 feet tall are tipped with soft, foxtail-shaped seed heads. Foliage turns rust gold in autumn and pale blonde in winter, and is a favorite stopover for birds. Taking moderate watering, it’s great match for late-season perennials and colorful shrubs in the sunny mixed border. Hardy to Zone 5. (Photo credit: NetPS Plantfinder.)  In stock now!

Sporobolis airoides (Alkali Sacaton)

Native! The ‘lit

tle brother’ of Giant Sacaton. The foliage mass is about 2’x2’, with the large, pinkish airy bloom/seed plumes rising to 40-48″ tall. For a ‘warm-season’ grass, Alkali Sacaton gets growing quite early in spring, so prune it back in February.  A robust native, Alkali Sacaton flowers for many months, beginning in June. Deep rooted, this grass grows well in all soil types including sand, loam and clay as well as alkaline and salty soils, and prefers moderate to low moisture.  On the prairie Sporobolus is used by animals for forage, cover and nesting. Its seeds are relished by birds. Hardy to Zone 4. (Photo credit: High Country Gardens.)  In stock now!

Sporobolis heterolepis (Prairie Dropseed)

Native! A lovely small grass found here in the foothills and eastward across the Western prairies. Growing to 1-2’ tall and wide, it makes an elegant, fine-textured, emerald green fountain, suitable in many garden styles. The fine-textured plumes that rise above the foliage clump are attractive in bloom and in seed, and are favored by songbirds. The inflorescences are pleasantly fragrant – some say they smell like burnt buttered popcorn. Plains Indian tribes ground the seeds to make a tasty flour. Prairie Dropseed is also drought tolerant and turns a nice russet brown in fall. Hardy to Zone 4. (Photo credit: CSU Extension.) In stock soon!

Sporobolis wrightii (Giant Sacaton, Wright’s Sacaton)

Comes up earlier in spring than most other warm season grasses. It also flowers earlier than most other warm-season grasses. This huge S.W. native grass grows to 6-10’ tall and 4-6’ wide, tolerates most soils and is very drought-tolerant. Huge airy flower/seed panicles are ornamental well into winter. Hardy to Zone 5. Cut back to 2-3” in late winter. (Photo credit: Plant Select.) In stock now!

Sorghastrum nutans (Indian Grass)

Native! A tall & narrow grass that is an important part of the tall grass prairie. Here it grows in an upright clump to 6’tall x 3’wide. Indian Grass. Flowering stalks are topped by dense golden flame-shaped inflorescences which mature to brown, bearing numerous nutritious seeds that were used by Native Americans to produce flour. It can grow in a wide range of soils and tolerates drought, cold, salinity and heavy clay, but prefers rich, silty-loams in full sun. Indian grass attracts wildlife; bees come to the blossoms, songbirds eat the seeds, and it provides excellent cover for pheasants, quail, mourning doves and prairie chickens. We sell the seed-grown species, with bluish foliage, and Plant Select’s “Thin Man”, which has distinctly blue foliage and especially narrow habit. Hardy to Zone 4. (Photo credit: Plant Select.)  In stock now!



FULL LIST OF ORNAMENTAL GRASSES IN STOCK:

Achnatherum calamagrostis UNDAUNTED® Alpine Plume Grass (Alpine Plume Grass)
Achnatherum hymenoides (Indian ricegrass)
Andropogon gerardi (Big Bluestem Grass)
Bothriochloa scoparium (Silver Beard Grass)
Bouteloua gracilis (Blue Grama)
Bouteloua gracilis ‘Blonde Ambition’ (Blonde Ambition Grass)
Calamagrostis acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’ (Karl Foerster Feather Reed Grass)
Carex appalachia (Appalachian Sedge)
Deschampsia cespitosa (Tufted Hairgrass)
Eragrostis trichodes (Sand Love Grass)
Festuca glauca ‘Boulder Blue’ (Boulder Blue Fescue)
Festuca idahoensis (Idaho Fescue) 
Festuca ovina ‘Sea Urchin’
Festuca thurberi
Helictotrichon sempervirens (Blue Oat/Avena Grass)
Hierochloe odorata (Sweetgrass)
Muhlenbergia montana (Mountain Muhly)
Muhlenbergia reverchonii ‘Undaunted’
Nassella tenuissima (Ponytail/Mexican Feather Grass)
Oryzopsis hymenoides (Indian Rice Grass)
Panicum virgatum (Switchgrass)
Panicum virgatum ‘Shenandoah’ & ‘Heavy Metal’
Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Hameln’ (Dwarf Fountain Grass)
Schizachyrium scoparium (Little Bluestem) ‘Blaze’, ‘The Blues’, ‘Prairie Blues’
Sorghastrum nutans ‘Cheyenne’ (Indian Grass)
Sporobolus airoides (Alkali Sacaton)
Sporobolus wrightii (Giant Sacaton)

ORNAMENTAL GRASSES ARRIVING SOON:

Chasmanthium latifolium (Northern Sea Oats)
Koeleria macrantha (June Grass)
Sporobolus heterolepis (Prairie Dropseed)



PLANTING AND CARE FOR YOUR ORNAMENTAL GRASS

  • Easy to grow, beautiful, versatile, and durable.
  • Use for accents, massing, meadow, groundcover, to provide motion, grace, and great fall and winter interest.
  • Many thrive on little water, many are natives.
  • All but one are clump-forming, without invasive spreading roots.
  • Plant throughout growing season with adequate water. 
  • Most grasses live longer & sturdier if grown in leaner conditions.
  • Use light applications of organic fertilizer and/or compost or aged manure.
  • We recommend: Richlawn Organic, Yum Yum or Alpha-One fertilizer, Compost, and Dairy Cow Manure.


OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

JULY

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom last week and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.
 



AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




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We’re looking forward to seeing you soon! 
In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

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Flash Sale and July Blooms

FLASH SALE!

And, What’s Blooming in July

We hope that you’re not too busy to stop by for some great plants at much-reduced prices!  We have a Flash Sale on “Small Lots” and are sharing our remaining veggie and annual flower starts with you for FREE! More on both topics, below. 

Many plants are showing off their summer color right now, especially after our bountifully wet spring.  Over the years Harlequin’s Gardens has compiled a list of many of the July Blooming plants, below.  (Pictured above, Berlandiera lyrata, Chocolate Flower.)  (Pictured left, Dianthus sp. Tuscan Honeymoon.)  By popular request, we have restocked Russian Sage, a strong summer bloomer. 

Compost tea is also great to apply at this point in the summer.  Similar to a tonic, compost tea will help boost ailing plants, will minimize transplant shock, and provide extra vitality to your plants.  Compost tea is available for $5 a gallon and can be diluted up to four times.  It’s important to know that compost tea should be used within two hours to receive maximum benefit of the live microbes.  Try some today!

This weekend we return to our educational classes with “Tips & Tricks of Xeriscape”.  This Sunday at 1:00, Mikl with share valuable information on how to improve your success with low-water gardening.   Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!




Small Lots Flash Sale! 

Starting tomorrow, Wed., July 10 through Tues., July 17 we have some great prices for you, making this a great time to fill in any empty holes in your garden!

2.5″ pots for $1 

(regularly 3.95)

#2 pots for $10 – $15

(regularly $28) 

#5 pots for $25

(regularly $44 – $85)




FULL-TIME OFFICE MANAGER position

Harlequin’s Gardens is looking for a positive, creative, flexible, tech-savvy person with excellent skills in communication and team-work to start soon.  Duties include data entry, social media, bill-paying, label and sign-making, advertising and promotion, supply orders, staff and customer support. Must be able to work at least one weekend day. Ideally, the candidate should be physically fit, able to lift 40 lbs, and have some familiarity with plants and gardening.  This is a full-time, year-round position.

Please send your resume to Staff@HarlequinsGardens.com




FREE VEGGIES & ANNUALS!  

While the peak time to plant your veggies has passed, it’s never too late to plant a free plant!  Come see our feature table of remaining warm-season veggies and flowering annuals and take a few home.  But, be sure to stop by between now and Saturday when the give-away ends! 



WHAT’S BLOOMING IN JULY?

Many gardeners think of Spring as the height of the ornamental gardening season. Sure, so many of our best-known flowering plants – Tulip, Crocus, Daffodil, Primrose, Peony, Lilac, Forsythia, Oriental Poppy, Basket of Gold, Bearded Iris, are at their showiest in spring. But as we pass to the other side of the Summer Solstice, a whole new palette of blooms arises, including many Natives, lots of Prairie-dwellers and Steppe plants, and hardy plants from South of the Border, bringing bold color and attracting more and different beneficial insects and pollinators to the garden.

Here is some of our list of July beauties.  For the full list of those July flowers to inspire you, Click here, or visit the nursery for the list! 

  • Clematis fruticosa ‘Mongolian Gold’ 
  • Clematis integrifolia (Bush Clematis)
  • Clematis x texensis ‘Princess Diana’
  • Clematis The President
  • Coreopsis – many species & cultivars
  • Dalea purpurea (Purple Prairie Clover)
  • Datura meteloides (Angel’s Trumpet)
  • Delosperma (Hardy Ice Plant), many selections
  • Delphinium grandiflora, many selections  (Pictured right, Delphinium elatum ‘Magic Fountains’)
  • Dianthus petraeus noeanus (Jasmine Dianthus)
  • Dianthus sp. Tuscan Honeymoon
  • Diascia i. Coral Canyon (Coral Canyon Twinspur)
  • Echinacea, many species & cultivars (Coneflower)
  • Fallopia aubertii (Silver Lace Vine)
  • Gaillardia (Blanket flower, Firewheel)



OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

JULY

Sun, Jul 14 at 1 PM        
TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE 
with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that no one else tells you that will greatly improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience. Class cost: $15

 

Sat, Jul 20 at 10 AM       
HONEY BEE MEET & GREET 
with Kristina Williams 

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knothole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside? Come take a peek inside a working hive of honeybees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general. Please wear long sleeves and pants. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jul 20 at 1 PM         
BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
with Elaine Walker    

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces. Class cost: $15



 

Sun, Jul 21 at 1 PM
The Wild Wisdom of Weeds with Katrina Blair and Tyler VanGemert

Tyler will begin the class with a centering movement that will prepare us for learning about the plants. Katrina Blair, author of “The Wild Wisdom of Weeds: 13 Essential Plants for Human Survival” will be here to share the exceptional nutrient and medicinal qualities of 13 useful plants that are abundant, free to harvest and readily available.  Her book will be available for sale. Class Cost: $15
 

Sun, Jul 21 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS —  P. 1:  REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. This is a good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before. Class cost: $15

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.


AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you soon! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


Get all the latest news from your friends at Harlequin’s Gardens.
www.harlequinsgardens.com

Independence Sale!

Veggies & Annual Flowers Half-Off!

If you want to fill-in your veggie beds and garden, or put-together an annual arrangement, this is a great time to do so.  All of our veggie plants and annual flowers on sale for HALF-OFF – wow!  With our recent warm, sunny days and afternoon rains, these plants will thrive in your garden.
(Pictured above, Sweet alysum & Annual Blue Salvia.)  (Pictured right, Pepper Santa Fe Grande, Jalapeno-type.) 

Compost tea is also great to apply at this point in the summer.  Similar to a tonic, compost tea will help boost ailing plants, will minimize transplant shock, and provide extra vitality to your plants.  Compost tea is available for $5 a gallon and can be diluted up to four times.  It’s important to know that compost tea should be used within two hours to receive maximum benefit of the live microbes.  Try some today!  



Harlequin’s Gardens will be CLOSED this Thursday, July 4, for Independence Day!

In a long-standing tradition, Harlequin’s Gardens celebrates Independence Day by taking the day off and being closed on Thursday, July 4.



SUMMER NECTAR FLOWS ARE ON!

Yellow sweet clover is about half-done and the area lindens are in full bloom with the recent spring rains having supported many other blooming plants as well. 

All beekeepers should be ready with mediums or shallows to pop on your hives as soon as you notice new white wax, especially a dusting of it over the top bars.  We’ve been working hard to assemble frames and boxes to be ready for your needs! 

You can also consider comb honey if your bees are doing well.  We have foundationless frames for the bees to makes their own fully edible honey comb. Try checkerboarding these with drawn comb or foundation.  Foundationless works especially well in shallow supers, but all size frames are on sale!




FULL-TIME OFFICE MANAGER position

Harlequin’s Gardens is looking for a positive, creative, flexible, tech-savvy person with excellent skills in communication and team-work to start soon.  Duties include data entry, social media, bill-paying, label and sign-making, advertising and promotion, supply orders, staff and customer support. Must be able to work at least one weekend day. Ideally, the candidate should be physically fit, able to lift 40 lbs, and have some familiarity with plants and gardening.  This is a full-time, year-round position.

Please send your resume to Staff@HarlequinsGardens.com




OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

JULY

Sun, Jul 14 at 1 PM        
TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE 
with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience. Class cost: $15


 

Sat, Jul 20 at 10 AM       
HONEY BEE MEET & GREET 
with Kristina Williams 

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knothole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside? Come take a peek inside a working hive of honeybees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general. Please wear long sleeves and pants. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jul 20 at 1 PM         
BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
with Elaine Walker    

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces. Class cost: $15



 

Sun, Jul 21 at 1 PM
The Wild Wisdom of Weeds with Katrina Blair and Tyler VanGemert

Tyler will begin the class with a centering movement that will prepare us for learning about the plants. Katrina Blair, author of “The Wild Wisdom of Weeds: 13 Essential Plants for Human Survival” will be here to share the exceptional nutrient and medicinal qualities of 13 useful plants that are abundant, free to harvest and readily available.  Her book will be available for sale. Class Cost: $15
 

Sun, Jul 21 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS —  P. 1:  REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. This is a good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before. Class cost: $15

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.


AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you soon! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


Get all the latest news from your friends at Harlequin’s Gardens.
www.harlequinsgardens.com

Bountiful Roses for Your Garden


Roses are now in full swing! In spite of a cool spring, late frosts and less sun than we are used to, the roses are glorious. The voluptuous and mostly very fragrant David Austin English roses love this wet weather. Even the Canadian Roses that are adapted to windswept prairies so they are cold-hardy, disease resistant and repeat blooming, are full of blossoms. And of course our Heirloom and Shrub roses are also looking good.  (Pictured above, Rose de Rescht.)

There are so many different kinds of roses with different flower forms and fragrances, that it is really best to choose them when in  bloom. Ours are in full bloom now and all of ours are grown on their own roots which means that they are not grafted, will be hardier, produce more blooms and live longer. Come out and see the wide selection of what we call “sustainable roses” — roses that prosper in Colorado without needing pesticides and fungicides, that do well with just 2 feedings a year and that need minimal pruning.  (More on rose feeding, below.)

Harlequin’s Gardens is famous for our roses! We have been specializing in roses for 25 years. If you would like to see Harlequin’s roses in action, visit the Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse. That garden is also the demonstration garden for the Boulder Valley Rose Society who have maintained them for 21 years with our help and Mile Hi Fertilizer.



Harlequin’s Gardens will be CLOSED Thur., July 4, on Independence Day!

In a long standing tradition, Harlequin’s Gardens celebrates Independence Day by taking the day off and being closed on Thursday, July 4.



FULL-TIME OFFICE MANAGER position

Harlequin’s Gardens is looking for a positive, creative, flexible, tech-savvy person with excellent skills in communication and team-work to start soon.  Duties include data entry, social media, bill-paying, label and sign-making, advertising and promotion, supply orders, staff and customer support. Must be able to work at least one weekend day. Ideally, the candidate should be physically fit, able to lift 40 lbs, and have some familiarity with plants and gardening.  This is a full-time, year-round position.

Please send your resume to Staff@HarlequinsGardens.com




NATIVE PLANT GARDEN TOUR 

This Saturday, June 29, the Colorado Native Plant Society (CoNPS) hosts it’s annual Native Plant Garden Tours in Boulder (9am – 1pm) and Denver (1pm – 5pm).  Each tour has six gardens that can be toured in any order.  We love this wonderful event so much that Harlequin’s Gardens is a sponsor!  Tour attendees will receive a 10% discount at Harlequin’s Gardens when they bring in their Garden Tour Ticket – wow! 

To register for the tour:
MEMBERS: log in first, then click on Calendar of Events for June 29.
NON-MEMBERS: go to Calendar of Events, then go to June 29.

The cost for Members is $20, and Non-Members is $30 for one tour.  For both the Boulder AND Denver Garden Tours the rates are Members $30, Non-Members $40. 

Have some extra time?  Volunteer for a two-hour shift and get a free ticket!  Contact Denise or CoNPSpromote@gmail.com for more details.  
 



ESSENTIALS FOR PEAK ROSE PERFORMANCE!
Mile Hi Rose Feed and Alfalfa Meal 

We like Mile Hi Rose Feed because it is formulated for Colorado soils, almost 100% organic, and contains 12 essential nutrients and trace minerals for roses, adds organic matter, and supports microorganisms. We’ve been using this for 18 years at the Boulder-Dushanbe Tea House with great results. 

We recommend mixing one cup of Mile Hi Rose Feed and one cup Alfalfa Meal, distributed throughout the drip-line of each rose.  (Once-blooming roses generally get by on less feeding than repeat-bloomers. For patio roses, reduce the amount by half.)  Work the mixture into the soil with a hand-trowel and water well. Apply once in the spring around Mother’s Day, and once in the late summer before Labor Day.  

Roses always appreciate occasional top-dressing with compost or well-rotted manure, too.


A Few of our Roses 

We have an amazing selection of roses right now and hope you come by soon to see them! 

FIRST ROW: Climbing American Beauty Rose, Rose Soltero Vigoroso, Rosa Mundi
SECOND ROW: Applejack Rose, Ice Cap Rose, Morden Sunrise Rose
THIRD ROW: Nearly Wild Rose, Lemon Sprite, Scepter d’Isle Rose
FOURTH ROW: Sunrise Sunset Rose, Sweet Drift Rose, The Gift Rose




OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

JULY

Sun, Jul 14 at 1 PM        
TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE 
with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience. Class cost: $15


 

Sat, Jul 20 at 10 AM       
HONEY BEE MEET & GREET 
with Kristina Williams 

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knothole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside? Come take a peek inside a working hive of honeybees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general. Please wear long sleeves and pants. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jul 20 at 1 PM         
BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
with Elaine Walker    

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces. Class cost: $15



 

Sun, Jul 21 at 1 PM
The Wild Wisdom of Weeds with Katrina Blair and Tyler VanGemert

Tyler will begin the class with a centering movement that will prepare us for learning about the plants. Katrina Blair, author of “The Wild Wisdom of Weeds: 13 Essential Plants for Human Survival” will be here to share the exceptional nutrient and medicinal qualities of 13 useful plants that are abundant, free to harvest and readily available.  Her book will be available for sale. Class Cost: $15
 

Sun, Jul 21 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS —  P. 1:  REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. This is a good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before. Class cost: $15

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.


AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you soon! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


Get all the latest news from your friends at Harlequin’s Gardens.
www.harlequinsgardens.com

Like Bountiful Roses for your Garden on Facebook

Pollinator Classes & Unusual specialty plants

Sadly we’re hearing more about the critical number of dying pollinators: this morning’s NPR headlines included Record Number of Honeybee Colonies Died Last Winter”.  According to the article, “in the Bee Informed Partnership’s latest survey released this week, U.S. beekeepers lost nearly 40% of their honeybee colonies last winter — the greatest reported winter hive loss since the partnership started its surveys 13 years ago.”   Culprits include lack of crop diversity, poor beekeeping practices, loss of habitat, Varroa Mites, and pesticide use.  It’s essential that we all support pollinators, since they help make it possible for us to eat.  According to the U.S. Agriculture Department, pollinators are responsible for one of every three bites of food that we take.

Harlequin’s Gardens is committed to bettering our environment for honeybees, native bees, and other pollinators by providing you with neonic-free and pesticide-free plants that are pollinator friendly, and keeping our Bee Barn stocked with treatments to combat your Varroa Mite issues.  Learn more about supporting the pollinators in your garden by attending our pollinator classes this weekend (details below).

Harlequin’s Gardens is also committed to providing you with unique and unusual specialty plants.  Below, Eve discusses several new selections, along with practical pots for your container garden. 



POLLINATOR CLASSES this WEEKEND!

In conjunction with Pollinator Month in Boulder and National Pollinator Week, June 17-23, we’re offering several special classes where you can learn how to support the important role of bees, birds, butterflies, bats, and beetles in pollinating our lovely flowers, native plants, fruits, and veggies. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 22 

Saturday morning at 10 AM, our own entomologist, Kristina Williams, will show you how to recognize and attract “Beneficial Insects” to your garden. 

This is followed at 1 PM by our (Free!) and very special Habitat Hero “Wildscaping 101” class.  Here Laura Somers helps you to view gardens as a bird does when seeking shelter, food and nesting opportunities.  A wealth of knowledge for a fantastic price!

SUNDAY, JUNE 23 

Kristina Williams returns on Sunday morning at 10 AM to share info on our most important, and perhaps underrated, pollinators: “Colorado Native Bees”.  She will tell you about our local species, where and how they nest, and their integral role in our ecosystem. 

Then at 1 PM, Mikl teaches us how to “Manage Garden Pests Without Using Poisons” – increasingly important techniques in our evolving world. Mikl has over 30 years of non-toxic gardening experience and wisdom to share!

We’re so proud to be offering these important classes and hope to see you there!  As always, pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403. 


For more information about Pollinator Partnership, visit their website where you’ll also find additional Programs, Resources and Events.




FULL-TIME OFFICE MANAGER position

Harlequin’s Gardens is looking for a positive, creative, flexible, tech-savvy person with excellent skills in communication and team-work to start soon.  Duties include data entry, social media, bill-paying, label and sign-making, advertising and promotion, supply orders, staff and customer support. Must be able to work at least one weekend day. Ideally, the candidate should be physically fit, able to lift 40 lbs, and have some familiarity with plants and gardening.  This is a full-time, year-round position.

Please send your resume to Staff@HarlequinsGardens.com



Harlequin’s Gardens will be CLOSED Thur., July 4, on Independence Day!

In a long standing tradition, Harlequin’s Gardens celebrates Independence Day by taking the day off and being closed on Thursday, July 4.




SPECIAL POTS and SPECIAL PLANTS! 

Double-walled Pots

Many of our customers have only a small patio, balcony or door-yard in which to garden, and we are determined to provide them with the materials and plants that will make gardening successful and convenient for them.

Enter the double-walled pots!  We know that glazed ceramic pots are beautiful, and we do carry some. However, when the pot size gets larger than about 12” diameter, the weight becomes an issue. Not only are our double-walled plastic pots very attractive and classically tasteful (they look like clay, not plastic), but they are very light-weight, very durable, and the air space between the walls provides excellent insulation from both cold and heat!

This bring up another advantage: many customers ask us about growing perennials in containers outdoors. While we cannot guarantee the survival of perennials over the winter in our double-walled pots, we can say that the insulating qualities of these pots greatly increase the chances of survival! Eve has good success with growing not only veggies, but hardy perennial herbs and flowers in them.

So, whether you’re growing vegetables or flowers in pots on a third-floor balcony, want to try growing perennials in large pots, or just want to plant in a large container that isn’t too heavy to lift and move around, we encourage you to have a look at our double-walled pots.


Unusual Specialty Plants 

Anthericum ramosum
Branched St. Bernard’s Lily, Grass Lily

Sun/Light shade
24-30” h x 2’ w
Most well-drained soils, moderate/low water
Hardy to Zone 5
A beautiful, under-used perennial from Turkey, Western and Central Europe, known as Branched St. Bernard’s Lily or Grass Lily. From tidy clumps of narrow grass-like leaves rise tall slender branching stems festooned with flurries of starry white flowers, each with a yellow ovary and yellow anthers, elegant and dainty, in midsummer. It is a refreshing delight on sunny days when the reflexed white flowers open fully. Grass Lily makes a wonderful companion to groupings of grasses, and lends an airy elegance to plantings of denser perennials. 
We’re also offering Anthericum liliago (St. Bernanrd’s Lily) which has been blooming for several weeks. 

Caesalpinia gillesii
Yellow Bird of Paradise 

This rare and striking fast-growing shrub sports very showy clusters of exotic yellow flowers with long red curved stamens that reach out 2” or more beyond the petals. The natural growth habit is irregular and open, but it can be pruned to encourage dense growth. Originally from Argentina & Uruguay, where it is a small tree. Yellow Bird of Paradise is hardy in the Denver/Boulder area if planted in a protected, hot location, where it will grow to 3-6’ tall and wide. Once established, it is drought-tolerant. At Denver Botanic Garden several specimens have thrived for many years in front of the east-facing foundation and windows of the main building’s entrance courtyard.  As the attractive tan pods mature, they split, sending the large, flat seeds flying, and leaving the dry pods twisted in tight spirals.
We are offering just a handful of these very special plants in 1-gallon pots.

Ceanothus ovatus
Prairie Redroot

3’ h x 3-4’ w
Full Sun to slight shade
Hardy to Zone 4
Also known as Prairie Redroot, Small Redroot, Narrow-leaved New Jersey Tea and Ceanothus herbaceus, this is a gorgeous, smaller shrub in the buckthorn family that is native from CO and WY, and the prairie and Great Plains states. From June to July its round, white flowers grow in numerous small clusters that yield black, triangular fruits. It is a small deciduous shrub that shoots several stems from the ground with alternating, toothed leaves that appear glossy or waxed. Preferring dry feet and liking mountains better than flatlands, Red Root is a fan of sunny areas with alkaline, medium-dry to dry, well-drained soils. Our plants originate from a Front Range seed source. This plant can also fix nitrogen from the atmosphere. 
Red Root draws a great variety of beneficial insects and pollinators, such as native bees, butterflies, wasps, flies and beetles, as well as birds.  All parts of Ceanothus ovatus and other Redroot species have been used extensively by N. American tribes and settlers to treat a vast array of disorders.
We are offering just a handful of these very special plants in 2-gallon pots.

Digitalis obscura
Sunset Foxglove

14-16” tall x 16-20” wide
Hardy to 6,200’
This 2004 Plant Select introduction is a stunning dwarf selection that produces a handsome mound of evergreen, willow-like foliage that is set off by rich, rusty orange trumpet-shaped flowers that look a lot like Penstemons, but in a whole new color! Sunset Foxglove is a perennial native to the mountains of Spain, and grows well in sunny or partly shaded areas and well-drained soil. The plants develop a woody base, and should be sheared back in early spring. They usually bloom for about a month, but prompt deadheading can prolong the bloom period. Sunset Foxglove is deer-resistant and water-wise!

Echinocereus viridiflorus
Green Pitaya

Native to our grasslands, plains and mountain parks, this unique ball cactus makes low, rounded single stems or clumps, 3”x 3” that put out many 1” luminous lime green, fragrant flowers over a period of weeks in May. The attractive plant has distinctive red spines on the upper portion of the stems. Hardy to Zone 5 (4?).

You don’t have to plant ball cacti in a cactus ‘ghetto’ – they are care-free and easy to incorporate into any dry xeriscape garden that provides good drainage and lots of sun. There are, by the way, several ball cacti native to short-grass prairie – Coryphantha sulcata, Escobaria missouriensis, Pediocactus simpsonii and Echinocereus viridiflorus. These can be grown in locations with less sun than other cacti.

Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus (syn. H. flava)
Lemon Lily

24-30” tall x 24” wide
Full to partial Sun
Most garden soils, including clay
Hardy to Zone 4, 7500’
Thousands of hybrid selections of Daylilies are now available, but none of them have the natural grace and fragrance of this wildflower Lemon Lily, which is the first to bloom each season (usually beginning mid-late June). The smaller 3-4” wide lemon-yellow trumpets are blessed with delicious citrus fragrance, a must-have for any fragrance garden. They are held on bloom stalks above spreading clumps of narrow, arching strappy leaves. Lemon Lily is found wild across China, in N.E. Italy and Slovenia. Plants do not usually require dividing for several years, but are easily split apart in fall or early spring.

Ruta graveolens
Rue, Herb of Grace

12-24” high and wide
Full sun
Low water
Most soils
Hardy to Zone 4
Native to the Balkan peninsula, this beautiful herb has been grown for millennia as an herb and as an ornamental plant, especially for its lacy blue foliage, neat mounding form, its tolerance of hot and dry soil conditions, and as a medicinal herb and insect repellent. Small lemon-yellow flowers appear in June. The plant develops woody stems and can be quite log-lived. Rue can be used to form a low hedge, and since most cats dislike the smell of it, it can be used to deter them from your garden. Some people with sensitive skin may experience phytophotodermatitis from direct contact with the plant in sunny weather.




WARM-SEASON VEGGIE SELECTIONS

Below are our current in-stock selections of tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, cucumbers, winter and summer squashes.  

TOMATOES 



PEPPERS 



EGGPLANTS 


CUCUMBERS

Armenian
Marketmore
Spacemaster

ZUCCHINI / SUMMER SQUASH

Early Prolific Straight Neck Squash 

WINTER SQUASH

Blue Ballet Hubbard Squash
Potimarron
Red Kuri Kabocha
Sibley Banana Winter Squash
Tetsukabuto
Winter Luxury

BASIL 

Cinnamon or Mexican
Genovese
Italian Large Leaf
Kapoor Holy Basil
Platou Pistou
Purple Opal
Sacred Holy Basil
Sweet Basil
Thai




OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

JUNE

Sat, Jun 22 at 10 AM           
BENEFICIAL INSECTS 
with Kristina Williams 

Not all insects will harm your garden; and in fact many insects are “good guys” that will not only control garden pests but also help your garden in other ways. Learn how to recognize and attract beneficial insects to your yard and garden. Class cost: $15

 

Sat, Jun 22, 1-2 PM        
HABITAT HERO – WILDSCAPING 101 (FREE!) 
with Laura Somers 

Laura Somers, Wildscape Ambassador, representing Audubon Rockies and Colorado Native Plant Society will demonstrate the importance of restoring our communities, one garden patch at a time. From a birds-eye view, learn how to create wildlife-friendly gardens that help combat the loss of open spaces and create green corridors that link your wildscape to larger natural areas by providing habitat for wildlife.  Free admission!
 

Sun, Jun 23 at 10 AM
COLORADO NATIVE BEES 
with Kristina Williams 

If you have a backyard garden, it’s probably being pollinated by some of Boulder County’s 500+ species of native bees. Kristina will talk about some of the basic types and how you can create bee friendly habitat to invite them to your yard. She will walk you through Harlequins’ demonstration gardens to observe some of these bees in action. An informative class by an experienced bee keeper!  Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jun 23 at 1 PM           
MANAGING GARDEN PESTS WITHOUT POISONS 
with Mikl Brawner     

Learn how to look for and identify common pests, and how to judge if anything needs to be done. Learn which organic solutions are the most effective, for what, and how to do it. Mikl has been walking this talk for 35 years. Class cost: $15
 


JULY

Sun, Jul 14 at 1 PM        
TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE 
with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience. Class cost: $15


 

Sat, Jul 20 at 10 AM       
HONEY BEE MEET & GREET 
with Kristina Williams 

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knothole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside? Come take a peek inside a working hive of honeybees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general. Please wear long sleeves and pants. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jul 20 at 1 PM         
BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
with Elaine Walker    

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces. Class cost: $15



 

Sun, Jul 21 at 1 PM
The Wild Wisdom of Weeds with Katrina Blair and Tyler VanGemert

Tyler will begin the class with a centering movement that will prepare us for learning about the plants. Katrina Blair, author of “The Wild Wisdom of Weeds: 13 Essential Plants for Human Survival” will be here to share the exceptional nutrient and medicinal qualities of 13 useful plants that are abundant, free to harvest and readily available.  Her book will be available for sale. Class Cost: $15
 

Sun, Jul 21 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS —  P. 1:  REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. This is a good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before. Class cost: $15

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.


AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you soon! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


Get all the latest news from your friends at Harlequin’s Gardens.
www.harlequinsgardens.com

Like Pollinator Classes & Unusual Specialty Plants on Facebook

It’s Pollinator Month!

Our recent weather pattern of a sunny morning and early afternoon followed by afternoon rain showers seems to be a nice return to the weather patterns we used to have in this area.  This provides a welcome environment for gardening and planting new plants.  Our herb section is looking especially bounteous as is our collection of columbine plants and clematis vines.  We hope that you stop by to see our newest offerings of neonic-free, pollinator friendly, Colorado-adapted plants!

Our pollinator friendly plants are particularly important since June is Pollinator Month in Boulder, and June 17-23 is National Pollinator Week.  Harlequin’s Gardens is here to help you celebrate in a variety of ways! In Kristina Williams’ June Bee Buzz article below, she outlines the many ways you can support our local pollinators.  Kristina is a professional entomologist, president the Boulder Beekeepers Association, a beekeeper for 35 years, and Director of Harlequin’s Gardens’ Bee-keeping supply shop. She is available to help people with beekeeping questions and beekeeping equipment, and is teaching several Bee Classes, outlined below..

We have a not-to-be-missed class this weekend – Zach Hedstrom’s ‘Mushroom Cultivation and Identification’ class!  This is a unique opportunity for you to learn in a hands-on environment about local wild mushrooms: how to identify (participants will receive a mushroom identification packet for local mushrooms), spore plugs, and knowledge on how to grow them – a bargain for the $75 class cost!  This full day (Saturday, June 8 from 10 AM to 3 PM) class will be led by noted mycology expert, Zach Hedstrom.  We’re so fortunate to have his expertise for an entire day!  Last year Eve attended the class and said that everyone had a great time and learned so much; additionally other attendees have reported fantastic results growing their own mushrooms! Please call soon to reserve your spot as we have a 12 person maximum.   

On Sunday at 1:00, Mikl will teach you how to redirect your table scraps and garden clippings into food for the soil – a process know as composting.  In this “Successful Home Composting” class Mikl will show you how to let nature do the work for you! 

Further class details are listed below and as always, please call to register:  303-939-9403. 




OUR WARM-SEASON VEGGIE SELECTION IS HOT!

Our selection of tomatoes is very abundant as is our winter squashes and melons.  Soon we will have more cucumber and zucchini starts ready for you.  Below are our current in-stock selections of tomatoes, peppers and eggplants.  

TOMATOES 



PEPPERS 



EGGPLANTS 




JUNE BEE BUZZ 

The month of June is Pollinator Month in Boulder, and June 17-23 is National Pollinator Week.  Harlequin’s Gardens is here to help you celebrate in a variety of ways!

PLANTS

The best way to support pollinators is to provide safe forage and habitat.  First, our plants are all neonicotinoid-free. Neonicotinoids are systemic insecticides that circulate through the entire plant, including nectar and pollen, which are collected by bees for food.  Bees, with their fuzzy bodies and need for pollen for their baby food are the best pollinators.

Second, our plants are adapted to our local environment. This means that they’re ‘happier’ here and require less chemical and water input.  We carry many plants from ground covers to trees, among them Nepeta (catmint) and Helianthus (sunflower), that will provide for pollinators in general, as well as some plants visited by bee specialists, for example Sphaeralcea (mallow) and Oenothera (evening primrose).  Even our own-root roses, selected for our climate and soils, are good for pollinators.  As a rule of thumb, if you can see the stamens, so can the bees. Ask for our pollinator plant lists to help you shop. 

Ask for our pollinator plant lists to help you shop, or prepare in advance by visiting our website “Plants for Bees and other Pollinators” and “Plants for Pollinators List”

PICTURED POLLINATOR PLANTS:

Top Row: Tiger Swallowtail on Larkspur,  Seseli gummiferum (Moon Carrot)
Second Row: Genista lydia (Dwarf Golden Broom), Allium ‘Millenium’, Achillea (Yarrow)
Third Row: Origanum ‘Kent’s Beauty, Native bee on native Gaillardia, Gallardia aristata
Fourth Row: Asclepias curassavica (Milkweed), Sambucus nigra (Elderberry), Dictamnus albus (Gas Plant)

UPCOMING POLLINATOR CLASSES 

We’ll feature pollinators in our classes too where you can learn how to support the important role of bees, birds, butterflies, bats, and beetles in pollinating our lovely flowers, native plants, fruits, and veggies. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 22 

Saturday morning at 10 AM, our own entomologist, Kristina Williams, will show you how to recognize and attract “Beneficial Insects” to your garden. 

This is followed at 1 PM by our (Free!) and very special Habitat Hero Wildscaping 101 class.  Here Laura Somers helps you to view gardens as a bird does when seeking shelter, food and nesting opportunities.  A wealth of knowledge for a fantastic price!

SUNDAY, JUNE 23 

Kristina returns on Sunday morning at 10 AM to share info on our most important, and perhaps underrated, pollinators: Colorado Native Bees.  She will tell you about our local species, where and how they nest, and their integral role in our ecosystem. 

Then at 1 PM, Mikl teaches us how to Manage Garden Pests Without Using Poisons – increasingly important techniques in our evolving world. Mikl has over 30 years of non-toxic gardening experience and wisdom to share!

We’re so proud to be offering these important classes and hope to see you there!  As always, pre-registration is appreciated and highly recommended for all classes with a quick call to 303-939-9403. 

SUPPLIES​

This year our Bee Barn offers supplies for cultivating some of the Front Range’s 500+ species of native bees as well as the better known European honey bee.

This is the month to start making serious plans for the health of your honey bees.  Varroa mite levels will climb steeply in July, but we have the tools to monitor them and ways to knock them down before they knock your bees down. European Foulbrood has been rearing its ugly head too.  We carry easy-to-use diagnostic kits to determine whether your bees have it and will need to be seen by a vet.

NATIVE BEES

Honey bees aren’t practical for everyone, but our native, mostly solitary bees did ALL of the bee-pollinating in the Americas before the introduction of honey bees from Europe in the 1600s.  They love our weather, soils and native plants. And we love them! This year we’re excited to add a selection of products to help you culture some of these gentle hole nesting bees where you live, including mason bees and leafcutter bees.  Did you know that re-using old nesting tubes or blocks drilled with holes can promote diseases and parasites? We’ve partnered with Crown Bees to bring you responsible, sustainable, clean culture methods, based on the needs of the bees.

Here’s a sample of the items we’re offering. 

Native Bee Chalet

For placing nesting tubes for the current season and an attic for placing the previous season’s bees to emerge in the current season.

Reusable cardboard mason bee tubes with disposable paper liners

For those interested in spring mason bees in particular. Pollinator Pack: Tubes in an assortment of sizes and materials provide nesting holes for a variety of our native bees.

Native Bee Guide Booklet

A brief introduction to just some of the bee species that may nest in your native bee house.

The Mason Bee Revolution book

For those who are seriously into mason bees, early season pollinators.

For more information about Pollinator Partnership, visit their website where you’ll also find additional Programs, Resources and Events.



OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

JUNE

Sat, Jun 8, 10 AM to 3 PM      
MUSHROOM CULTIVATION AND IDENTIFICATION HANDS-ON CLASS 
with Zach Hedstrom 

Mushrooms are delicious and healthy, but also shrouded in mystery! Learn more about them in this Mushroom Cultivation and Identification Workshop taught by mycology enthusiast Zach Hedstrom. Plan to leave the class with basic knowledge about how to grow mushrooms, the ways in which fungi can increase ecological vitality, as well as familiarity with the process of identification and various local wild mushroom species. Participants will partake in 2 hands-on mushroom growing activities and take away a log inoculated with Oyster Mushroom spawn that, with proper care, will produce tasty mushrooms for multiple years. Everyone will also receive a handout packet for help in identifying local mushrooms. Participants should bring their own lunch, and weather-appropriate clothing. It will be a day full of fungi, and FUN! Please call to reserve your spot (303-939-9403). $75 per person, 12 person maximum.
 

Sun, Jun 9 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HOME COMPOSTING 
with Mikl Brawner 

Learn how to turn waste into wealth by cultivating soil microorganisms. Nature does the work if you know how to lend a hand. In this class, you will learn what works in our climate, and what doesn’t. Mikl has been composting for 35 years. Class cost: $15
 


Sun, Jun 16 at 1 PM         
BERRIES & SMALL FRUITS FOR COLORADO 
with Mikl Brawner 

Small fruits are delicious, high in antioxidants, take up less space and bear sooner than trees: strawberries, currants, raspberries, grapes, gooseberries. Learn about the best varieties for Colorado and how to grow them. Class cost: $15.   (NOTE: This class was originally scheduled for Sunday, June 2 at 1 PM.)
 

Sat, Jun 22 at 10 AM           
BENEFICIAL INSECTS 
with Kristina Williams 

Not all insects will harm your garden; and in fact many insects are “good guys” that will not only control garden pests but also help your garden in other ways. Learn how to recognize and attract beneficial insects to your yard and garden. Class cost: $15

 

Sat, Jun 22, 1-2 PM        
HABITAT HERO – WILDSCAPING 101 (FREE!) 
with Laura Somers 

Laura Somers, Wildscape Ambassador, representing Audubon Rockies and Colorado Native Plant Society will demonstrate the importance of restoring our communities, one garden patch at a time. From a birds-eye view, learn how to create wildlife-friendly gardens that help combat the loss of open spaces and create green corridors that link your wildscape to larger natural areas by providing habitat for wildlife.  Free admission!
 

Sun, Jun 23 at 10 AM
COLORADO NATIVE BEES 
with Kristina Williams 

If you have a backyard garden, it’s probably being pollinated by some of Boulder County’s 500+ species of native bees. Kristina will talk about some of the basic types and how you can create bee friendly habitat to invite them to your yard. She will walk you through Harlequins’ demonstration gardens to observe some of these bees in action. An informative class by an experienced bee keeper!  Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jun 23 at 1 PM           
MANAGING GARDEN PESTS WITHOUT POISONS 
with Mikl Brawner     

Learn how to look for and identify common pests, and how to judge if anything needs to be done. Learn which organic solutions are the most effective, for what, and how to do it. Mikl has been walking this talk for 35 years. Class cost: $15

JULY

Sun, Jul 14 at 1 PM        
TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE 
with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience. Class cost: $15


 

Sat, Jul 20 at 10 AM       
HONEY BEE MEET & GREET 
with Kristina Williams 

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knothole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside? Come take a peek inside a working hive of honeybees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general. Please wear long sleeves and pants. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jul 20 at 1 PM         
BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
with Elaine Walker    

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jul 21 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS —  P. 1:  REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. This is a good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before. Class cost: $15

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.


AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you soon! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


Get all the latest news from your friends at Harlequin’s Gardens.

The Pros and Cons of Late Season Snow

SNOW  or  SNOW  ??

At Harlequin’s Gardens we often tell customers that “Mid-May / Mother’s Day is our average last frost date.” The most important part of that sentence is “average”, and we remember a year when we experienced 23 degrees on May 24th. This week’s freezing temperatures and late-season snow were a surprise, presenting challenges and opportunities.  Challenges for the tender annuals and warm-season veggies that were recently planted (we hope that you were able to protect them with Solar Caps, Row Cover, or over-turned planting pots lined with bubble wrap).  Eve recommends our heavy duty tomato cages that really support the plants, and also can be used now to support tents of Row Cover or other fabric for quick protection from late snow or impending hail.  She especially likes the ‘inverted’ cages, which taper from a wide base to a smaller diameter top.  As a note, most annuals usually recover rapidly from snow breakage. 

If you recently purchased tender plants and haven’t yet planted them, it’s best to keep them comfy indoors and then begin hardening them off when the weather warms up again.  (See below for our Hardening Off Guidelines.)  But of course the snow and rain are providing much-valued moisture to our region, which is appreciated.  We can celebrate the wonderful delivery of free water!   Our native plants and those from similar regions, such as steppes (Siberia, Central Asia, etc.) are better at dealing with these weather events than non-regional tender.  

As a reminder from Arborist-Mikl, if you’re knocking the snow off of your shrubs, trees, etc, to be sure to do it by lifting the limbs from underneath as beating snow off from the top can cause branches to break.  If you do suffer a ragged branch break, give it a clean cut  as soon as you can.  

We have begun brewing compost tea, which is available by the gallon jug (bring your own or ‘rent’ ours for $1).  Compost tea is a great boost for struggling plants and to use on new plantings. 

While we have a Memorial Day weekend without classes, come June 1 and 2 we’re featuring three very informative classes beginning with co-presenters Kristina Williams and Mikl Brawner on the topic of “Japanese Beetles”, Saturday, June 1 at 10 AM.  Though it may seem early to begin thinking about this recent invader, NOW is the best time to begin building your defenses against them.  That afternoon at 1:00 PM, Kelly Grummons will introduce you to “Dog Tuff™ Grass”, a hardy, warm-season, sun-loving turf grass that requires just a fraction of the water of traditional turf grass, and only occasional mowing.   On Sunday, June 2 at 1:00 PM, Mikl presents his popular “Berries and Small Fruits for Colorado” class.  

Further class details are listed below and as always, please call to register:    303-939-9403 




OUR WARM-SEASON VEGGIE SELECTION IS HOT!

Our last shipment of tomatoes will arrive tomorrow – wow!  We will also be receiving more peppers and Genovese Basil.  Come on in to see what other surprises are arriving!  
Below are our current in-stock selections of tomatoes, peppers and eggplants.  In addition we have Toma Verde Tomatillo’s (remember, you need 2 for pollination!), Okra, and Ground Cherries available.

TOMATOES 

PLUS, all the varieties that will arrive tomorrow!



PEPPERS 



EGGPLANTS 

Black Beauty
Galine
Listada de Gandia
Long Purple
Paloma
Pingtung Long
Prosperosa
Rosa Bianca




HARDENING OFF GUIDELINES

Transitioning tender annuals, vegetable, and other plants, from a cushy greenhouse setting to the outdoors is essential to getting them established.  Hardening off means to gradually acclimate plants to outdoor conditions prior to planting.  Plants grown indoors or in a greenhouse are not accustomed to the wind, sun, and other conditions they will encounter outside, and could freeze, dry out, or burn.

To harden off your plants, begin 5-7 days before transplant date.  Place the plants in a sheltered, shady spot outdoors.  Leave them for about 2-3 hours the first day, then gradually increase the time spent outside by 2-3 hours each day.  By the third day, try to add several hours of morning sun to the outdoor time.

Bring the plants back indoors each night, or if the outdoor temperature is below 45 degrees.

After the 5-7 day period, your babies can be planted in the garden! Be aware of weather conditions, though, and be prepared to cover the plants if inclement weather (snow, high winds, or freezing temperatures) is expected.



OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

JUNE

Sat, Jun 1 at 10 AM          
JAPANESE BEETLES 
with Kristina Williams 

Our resident entomologist Kristina Williams will present the natural history of the Japanese Beetle so that you can better understand the pest you’re up against. Mikl Brawner will talk about the new products we are trying out at Harlequin’s Gardens, which are also available for purchase. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 1 at 1 PM          
DOG TUFF GRASS 
with Kelly Grummons 

Bring out the hammock! If you have a sunny yard and need a super low-water, low-maintenance, no-mow lawn that‘s short, lush, soft and green in summer, plant Dog Tuff™ African Dogtooth Grass instead of Kentucky Bluegrass!  Kelly Grummons has been working for over 20 years on techniques of growing this exciting, beautiful and extremely low-water turf grass. It was chosen as a PLANT SELECT variety and promoted across the US in 2016, and Dog Tuff™ is now available at Harlequin’s Gardens! In this class, Kelly will demonstrate the techniques for converting your thirsty lawn into one that requires just a fraction of the water. The low-profile, lush green turf is sure to become a staple in our region. By the way, Dog Tuff Grass is also surprisingly resistant to dog urine spots! Kelly Grummons is a horticulturist and owner of Prairie Storm Nursery, coldhardycactus.com, dogtuffgrass.com and Plantselect.org. Class cost: $20
 

Sun, Jun 2 at 1 PM         
BERRIES & SMALL FRUITS FOR COLORADO with Mikl Brawner 

Small fruits are delicious, high in antioxidants, take up less space and bear sooner than trees: strawberries, currants, raspberries, grapes, gooseberries. Learn about the best varieties for Colorado and how to grow them. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 8, 10 AM to 3 PM      
MUSHROOM CULTIVATION AND IDENTIFICATION HANDS-ON CLASS 
with Zach Hedstrom 

Mushrooms are delicious and healthy, but also shrouded in mystery! Learn more about them in this Mushroom Cultivation and Identification Workshop taught by mycology enthusiast Zach Hedstrom. Plan to leave the class with basic knowledge about how to grow mushrooms, the ways in which fungi can increase ecological vitality, as well as familiarity with the process of identification and various local wild mushroom species. Participants will partake in 2 hands-on mushroom growing activities and take away a log inoculated with Oyster Mushroom spawn that, with proper care, will produce tasty mushrooms for multiple years. Everyone will also receive a handout packet for help in identifying local mushrooms. Participants should bring their own lunch, and weather-appropriate clothing. It will be a day full of fungi, and FUN! Please call to reserve your spot by April 30th(303-939-9403). $75 per person, 12 person maximum.
 

Sun, Jun 9 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HOME COMPOSTING 
with Mikl Brawner 

Learn how to turn waste into wealth by cultivating soil microorganisms. Nature does the work if you know how to lend a hand. In this class, you will learn what works in our climate, and what doesn’t. Mikl has been composting for 35 years. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 22 at 10 AM           
BENEFICIAL INSECTS 
with Kristina Williams 

Not all insects will harm your garden; and in fact many insects are “good guys” that will not only control garden pests but also help your garden in other ways. Learn how to recognize and attract beneficial insects to your yard and garden. Class cost: $15

 

Sat, Jun 22, 1-2 PM        
HABITAT HERO – WILDSCAPING 101 (FREE!) 
with Laura Somers 

Laura Somers, Wildscape Ambassador, representing Audubon Rockies and Colorado Native Plant Society will demonstrate the importance of restoring our communities, one garden patch at a time. From a birds-eye view, learn how to create wildlife-friendly gardens that help combat the loss of open spaces and create green corridors that link your wildscape to larger natural areas by providing habitat for wildlife.  Free admission!
 

Sun, Jun 23 at 10 AM
COLORADO NATIVE BEES 
with Kristina Williams 

If you have a backyard garden, it’s probably being pollinated by some of Boulder County’s 500+ species of native bees. We’ll talk about some of the basic types and how you can create bee friendly habitat to invite them to your yard. Then we’ll walk through Harlequins’ demonstration gardens to observe some of these bees in action. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jun 23 at 1 PM           
MANAGING GARDEN PESTS WITHOUT POISONS 
with Mikl Brawner     

Learn how to look for and identify common pests, and how to judge if anything needs to be done. Learn which organic solutions are the most effective, for what, and how to do it. Mikl has been walking this talk for 35 years. Class cost: $15

JULY

Sun, Jul 14 at 1 PM        
TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE 
with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience. Class cost: $15


 

Sat, Jul 20 at 10 AM       
HONEY BEE MEET & GREET 
with Kristina Williams 

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knothole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside? Come take a peek inside a working hive of honeybees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general. Please wear long sleeves and pants. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jul 20 at 1 PM         
BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
with Elaine Walker    

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jul 21 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS —  P. 1:  REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. This is a good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before. Class cost: $15

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.


AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




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Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you soon! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

More Plants and Mother’s Day Special

More Plants Have Arrived!

Just in time for Mother’s Day!

Snowy days are perfect for planning your garden and Eve has put together an article onPlants For Pollinators that will help you attract bees, butterflies and other flying friends (below).

We just received a huge delivery of beautiful, neonic-free plants including Hostas, Peonies, Bleeding Hearts, and many more garden favorites. We also now have Dahlia tubers from our friends Julie and Kurt at Arrowhead Dahlias in Platteville, CO (see list below). Many of you have been waiting for the arrival of Hablitzia tamnoides (Caucasian Mountain Spinach). It’s here! Since this plant is a vigorous, viney perennial, remember to plant it in an area of your garden where you won’t have to dig it up. Next week, peppers will be arriving! Lastly, we have restocked our Solar Caps, horticultural vinegar, and worm castings.

Don’t forget, on Saturday, May 11th is a very special class on Vermicomposting with Fort Collin’s Worm

Master, John Anderson! John will discuss the many ways worms can save the planet and explain why and how you can create worm compost. Worms will be available for purchase at the class for $40, plus the class fee of $15. Please call to register: 303-939-9403.
On Mother’s Day (Sunday, May 12th), roses are 15% off (a maximum of 2 roses per person)!
Coming next week: peppers, blooming annuals, and more perennials!


Help wanted at Harlequin’s Wholesale 

Plant production: This is a Full-time position through the growing season, involving physical outdoor work five days a week thru October, possibly later. Duties include
planting, watering, weeding, and propagation of organic plants using NO toxic pesticides, and occasional diverse tasks as needed. An excellent opportunity for an all-weather, reliable, hard-working, detail-oriented, plant-loving person, and an excellent learning opportunity. Please direct inquiries and send your resume to wholesale@harlequinsgardens.com



Dahlias Have Arrived!

Here are the varieties we’re carrying this year:
Banana Split
NTAC Solar Flare
Valley Rustbucket
Miss Delilah
Symphony
Diva
Camano Buz
Hollyhill Black Beauty
Cornel
Hillcrest Amour
Ivanetti
Caitlyn’s Joy



Pollinator Plants for Vegetable (and other) Gardens:

Photo at left: Malus ‘Thunderchild’ flowering crabapple by Joe Winslow

As gardeners, we are in a position to take positive and meaningful steps in supporting our diminishing pollinators and other beneficial insects, as well as many other members of our intricately interdependent ecosystems. Urban gardeners can be she/heroes in their own back yards and neighborhoods by eliminating the use of chemical fertilizers, chemical pesticides, and chemical herbicides. Now that we are cleaning up our act, we can invite our friends in the natural world to feast on the pollen, nectar fruits and seeds they need to survive and thrive. And at the same time, we are helping our gardens and ourselves to survive and thrive. Everybody does better when everybody does better! Harlequin’s Gardens is here to supply the best safe seeds, plants, products, and information to help you, your garden, your neighborhood, and ultimately, your planet.

Here are some suggestions for plant families and some of their specific members you can plant in and around your vegetable and fruit gardens to make them healthy, thriving havens for you and your ecosystem friends. To learn more, sign up for

The Borage (Boraginaceae) family contains many familiar garden flowers and native wildflowers, some of which are favorites of bees. Most of them are spring-bloomers. Borage and Phacelia are two of the best-known members of the family, which also includes Forget-me-Not, Chiming Bells (Lords & Ladies), Comfrey, Jacob’s Ladder, Lungwort, Alkanet (Anchusa), Echium, Lithospermum, and others.

The best Phacelia for supporting bees is P. tanacetifolia (known as Bee’s Friend), an annual species that is very pretty, with lacy-looking foliage and many small light purple flowers that show off their stamens. The blooms are arranged in a fascinating, spiraling structure called a scorpioid cyme. It grows very easily from seed, blooms all spring and into the summer, and is visited not only by honeybees, but also at least a few smaller native bees here. If allowed to self-sow, you can have a patch for years – especially if you shake the ripe seeds around in new beds. Every plant species seems to use (and potentially deplete) its own particular nutrient palette, and if grown continually in the same place, the colony will often diminish. Also be sure to maintain a diverse gene-pool by allowing self-sowing by numerous different individuals in the colony.

Phacelia campanularia is a smaller annual, with larger flowers (3/4”) that are stunning true blue, held singly or in small clusters in mid-spring. It is very drought tolerant, hence its common name: Desert Bluebells, and looks amazing with California Poppies.

If it’s bees you want to support, Calamintha nepeta (Calamint) and Pycnanthemum pilosum (Hairy Mountain Mint) are some of the best nectar sources for them, and are said to produce some of the finest honey. Both are perennials.  Actually, any plant in the Mint family, Labiatae, will get lots of attention from bees. Our native Monarda fistulosa (Bee Balm) is wonderful, as are the various selections and hybrid varieties of Monarda

that bloom in pink, lavender, purple,

or red. Many of our common culinary and medicinal herbs are in the mint family – Thyme, Savory, Rosemary, Sage, Lavender, Oregano, Catnip, Marjoram, Lemon Balm, Prunella (Self-Heal), Horehound (Marrubium) and of course, many varieties of Mint. The nectar of these plants contains powerful phytochemicals that help protect bees against mites, parasites and pathogens. Popular ornamentals in this family include Catmint (Nepeta), Agastache (sometimes called Hyssop), Traditional Hyssop, Salvia, Dragon’s Head, Phlomis. Members of the Mint family can be blooming through much of the spring, summer and fall.

Another Herb and Vegetable family that supports many, many beneficial insects, is the Apiaceae family

notice that the family name refers directly to bees, though the primary pollinators of this group are hordes of tiny beneficials that help protect gardens from destructive insects. This family includes Parsley, Cilantro, Dill, Fennel, Celery, Lovage, Sweet Cecily, Chervil, Angelica, Queen Anne’s Lace, Carrot, Celeriac, Parsnip, and a long list of ornamental garden plants and natives. The family includes both highly edible and highly poisonous plants, so if you come upon a plant that looks anything like one of the familiar edibles when you are in the wilds, do not taste it until you have made an absolutely positive identification. One more thing –  most of the Apiaceae family herbs and veggies are harvested for their leaves, roots or stems and are not allowed to flower. I always leave my Parsley plants in the garden over the winter (they’re biennials), harvest some leaves in the spring and then let them put out their flowers (that look like small, light yellow Queen Anne’s Lace), which they will do for most of the summer. Then I allow them to self-sow. One year, some Parsnip roots escaped my attention and sprouted 2nd year foliage and flowers in my garden. They were gorgeous! 30 to 36-inch tall plants, with big flat heads of tiny, bright gold flowers, and bold tropical-looking foliage.

Many members of the Asteracea (Aster or Sunflower) family provide great mid-summer and autumn forage for honeybees, native bees, butterflies and other beneficial insects and pollinators. This is a huge, diverse and widely distributed family, including all the daisy-type flowers (Dandelion, Fleabane, Zinnia, Marigold, Jerusalem Artichoke, Shasta Daisy, Sunflower, Arnica, Echinacea, Gayfeather (Liatris), Gaillardia (Blanket Flower), Mexican Hat, Aster, Cosmos, Dahlia, Calendula, Chicory, Lettuce, Radicchio, Artemisia, Artichoke, Thistle, Gerbera, Chamomile, Yarrow, Ragweed, Goldenrod, Rabbitbrush, Black-eyed Susan, Coreopsis, and thousands more. Their seeds often provide important food for songbirds, as well.

Honeybees find my perennial ‘Rustic’ Arugula one of their top favorites in my garden. I always allow some of them to flower, sending up skinny bloom stalks up to 2 or 3’ tall for many months. They are always blooming, from late-spring to autumn frosts, with small bright yellow, 4-petaled (cruciform) flowers. If your Kale over-winters, it too will ‘bolt’ (start to flower) in its second spring. Other familiar members of this family, Brassicaceae,  include Cabbage, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Collards, Mustard, ‘Canola’ (Rapeseed), Mizuna, Watercress, Radish, Turnip, Kohlrabi, Rutabaga, Stock, Wallflower, Sweet Alyssum, Basket-of-Gold, Aubrieta and many other garden flowers and wildflowers. The vegetables on the list will only benefit pollinators if they are allowed to bloom.

The Onion family,Amaryllidaceae, is well-represented in most vegetable gardens, as well as ornamental gardens. Flowers in this family provide great nectar sources for bees of many species. The edible Onions, Leeks, Garlic, Shallots, and Scallions aren’t usually given a chance to bloom before harvest, but Chives, Garlic Chives, Altai Onion, Welsh Onion and Ramps are perennial, so you can have flowers and still get a crop. There are plenty of popular ornamental Onions (Alliums), most growing from bulbs, and natives in the family. Nodding Onion (Allium cernuum), which blooms in summer, is an eminently garden-worthy native. Many spring-blooming bulbs (Crocus, Glory-of-the-Snow, Snowdrops, Tulips, Foxtail Lily, Camas, Hyacinth, Grape Hyacinth, and many more) are in this and other closely-allied families, and provide important bee forage early in the season.

Legumes, such as Clovers, peas and beans are members of the Fabaceae family. Some, like garden peas and beans, are self-

pollinating, and don’t require the help of pollinating insects. But lots of others can be important pollinator-attractors for honeybees, bumblebees and butterflies. Some garden-worthy natives that bees and butterflies of various types will flock to include the shrubs Amorpha fruticosa, A. nana, and A. canescens (Leadplant), and herbaceous perennials Dalea purpurea (Purple Prairie Clover), Golden Banner, and Silver Lupine. In addition, clovers and vetches support many bees and other pollinators, and are excellent cover crops in gardens. Traditional ornamentals in the family include Redbud trees, Wisteria vines, False indigo (Baptisia australis and other species), and garden Lupines (L. polyphyllus hybrids).

The Rosaceae family includes most of the temperate-zone fruits and berries, all of which are bee-pollinated: Apples, Crabapples, Pears, Peaches, Cherries, Plums, Apricots, Nectarines, Strawberries, Raspberries, Serviceberries, Blackberries, and a number of hybrids involving raspberries and blackberries. Along with these, the ornamental versions of these trees and shrubs, especially Flowering Crabapple and several selections of small-fruited plums, are equally dependent on wild and domesticated bees for pollination, and in a good year, will bring the pollinators in large numbers when they bloom. Roses are also pollinated primarily by bees, and are often popular with them. Native shrubs and trees in this family include Apache Plume, Fernbush, Fendlerbush, Sandcherry, Serviceberry, Chokecherry, American Plum, Antelope Bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), Cliffrose (Purshia (Cowania) stansburyana).

A  few notable additions to this list are representatives of other plant families:

Asclepias speciosa (Showy Milkweed) – eagerly pollinated by bees and butterflies. Larval host to Monarch butterflies.
Ribes aureum (Golden Currant) – pollinated by Bumblebees
Mahonia aquifolium and M. repens – excellent early spring forage for bees
Cleome serrulata (Rocky Mt. Bee Plant) – a wonderful wildling for bees of many kinds
Larkspur and Delphinium (Consolida ajacis or regalis, and native or exotic Delphinium) great for Bumblebees
Buckwheats (Eriogonum species like native Sulphur Buckwheat, and many others, as well as cultivated Buckwheat, grown as a seed crop or as a cover crop, and excellent forage for bees.
Poppies of all kinds are eagerly pollinated by honeybees and some native bees
Cactus flowers are also heavily laden with pollen that brings bees of many kinds.
Globe Mallow species attract lots of honeybees



OUR CLASS OFFERINGS

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

MAY

Sat, May 11 at 1 PM           
VERMICOMPOSTINGwith John Anderson 

The many ways worms can save the planet – they are nature’s gift that keeps on giving! Worm Man, John Anderson, will explain why and how you can create worm compost. The hope and change we’ve been waiting for right under your feet!  Worms will be available for purchase at the class for $40, plus the class fee of $15.
 

Sat, May 18 at 10 AM        
GARDENING WITH FRIENDS: INVITING WILDLIFE INTO YOUR GARDEN THROUGH LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck 

Living in a garden humming with life is a joy! Share you yard with birds, butterflies, pollinators and more.  You’ll learn how to provide a home for all life (maybe not deer), and why insects are a gardener’s friend, not the enemy. We’ll discuss overall landscape design strategies, as well as detailed information on plants that provide wildlife habitat, including many native plants. Alison has been designing landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping. Class cost: $15. 
 

Sat, May 18 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HIGH-ALTITUDE LANDSCAPE GARDENING with Irene Shonle

Mountain gardening is a challenge, with the short growing season, cold winters, water rights issues, critters and more. In this class, Irene will talk about ways to work with these challenges, and will discuss a palette of good mountain-hardy perennials, shrubs and trees that are low-water and provide pollinator/bird benefits. Irene Shonle is the Director of CSU Extension in Gilpin County. She holds a PhD in Ecology from U. of Chicago. She teaches and writes about native plants all across the state and is very involved with the Native Plant Master Program. She gardens (mostly with natives) in the mountains at her home and in demo gardens outside the Extension Office. Class cost: $15
 

Sun, May 19 at 10 AM
Tomato Tutelage 
with Kelly Grummons: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO GROW GREAT TOMATOES!

This class takes the mystery out of growing good tomatoes in our area. You always hear “It’s a good tomato year” or “It’s a bad tomato year”. Learn how to make EVERY year a “good tomato year”! Kelly will discuss garden soil preparation, culture in the ground and in pots, nutrition, tomato pests and diseases. Learn about the best varieties to grow here and how to maximize your harvest. Kelly Grummons is a horticulturalist and tomato aficionado. Class Cost: $20
 

Sun, May 19 at 1 PM     
BEST FRUIT TREES FOR COLORADO 
with Mikl Brawner

Learn which varieties of fruit trees are successful here, which are not, and which are good flavored: Apples, Cherries, Plums, Pears, Peaches. Mikl’s first orchard was in 1976 and he will teach you how to care for your fruit trees. Class cost: $15
 

JUNE

Sat, Jun 1 at 10 AM          
JAPANESE BEETLES 
with Kristina Williams 

Our resident entomologist Kristina Williams will present the natural history of the Japanese Beetle so that you can better understand the pest you’re up against. Mikl Brawner will talk about the new products we are trying out at Harlequin’s Gardens, which are also available for purchase. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 1 at 1 PM          
DOG TUFF GRASS 
with Kelly Grummons 

Bring out the hammock! If you have a sunny yard and need a super low-water, low-maintenance, no-mow lawn that‘s short, lush, soft and green in summer, plant Dog Tuff™ African Dogtooth Grass instead of Kentucky Bluegrass!  Kelly Grummons has been working for over 20 years on techniques of growing this exciting, beautiful and extremely low-water turf grass. It was chosen as a PLANT SELECT variety and promoted across the US in 2016, and Dog Tuff™ is now available at Harlequin’s Gardens! In this class, Kelly will demonstrate the techniques for converting your thirsty lawn into one that requires just a fraction of the water. The low-profile, lush green turf is sure to become a staple in our region. By the way, Dog Tuff Grass is also surprisingly resistant to dog urine spots! Kelly Grummons is a horticulturist and owner of Prairie Storm Nursery, coldhardycactus.com, dogtuffgrass.com and Plantselect.org. Class cost: $20
 

Sun, Jun 2 at 1 PM         
BERRIES & SMALL FRUITS FOR COLORADO with Mikl Brawner 

Small fruits are delicious, high in antioxidants, take up less space and bear sooner than trees: strawberries, currants, raspberries, grapes, gooseberries. Learn about the best varieties for Colorado and how to grow them. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 8, 10 AM to 3 PM      
MUSHROOM CULTIVATION AND IDENTIFICATION HANDS-ON CLASS 
with Zach Hedstrom 

Mushrooms are delicious and healthy, but also shrouded in mystery! Learn more about them in this Mushroom Cultivation and Identification Workshop taught by mycology enthusiast Zach Hedstrom. Plan to leave the class with basic knowledge about how to grow mushrooms, the ways in which fungi can increase ecological vitality, as well as familiarity with the process of identification and various local wild mushroom species. Participants will partake in 2 hands-on mushroom growing activities and take away a log inoculated with Oyster Mushroom spawn that, with proper care, will produce tasty mushrooms for multiple years. Everyone will also receive a handout packet for help in identifying local mushrooms. Participants should bring their own lunch, and weather-appropriate clothing. It will be a day full of fungi, and FUN! Please call to reserve your spot by April 30th(303-939-9403). $75 per person, 12 person maximum.
 

Sun, Jun 9 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HOME COMPOSTING 
with Mikl Brawner 

Learn how to turn waste into wealth by cultivating soil microorganisms. Nature does the work if you know how to lend a hand. In this class, you will learn what works in our climate, and what doesn’t. Mikl has been composting for 35 years. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jun 22 at 10 AM           
BENEFICIAL INSECTS 
with Kristina Williams 

Not all insects will harm your garden; and in fact many insects are “good guys” that will not only control garden pests but also help your garden in other ways. Learn how to recognize and attract beneficial insects to your yard and garden. Class cost: $15

 

Sat, Jun 22, 1-2 PM        
HABITAT HERO – WILDSCAPING 101 (FREE!) 
with Laura Somers 

Laura Somers, Wildscape Ambassador, representing Audubon Rockies and Colorado Native Plant Society will demonstrate the importance of restoring our communities, one garden patch at a time. From a birds-eye view, learn how to create wildlife-friendly gardens that help combat the loss of open spaces and create green corridors that link your wildscape to larger natural areas by providing habitat for wildlife.  Free admission!
 

Sun, Jun 23 at 10 AM
COLORADO NATIVE BEES 
with Kristina Williams 

If you have a backyard garden, it’s probably being pollinated by some of Boulder County’s 500+ species of native bees. We’ll talk about some of the basic types and how you can create bee friendly habitat to invite them to your yard. Then we’ll walk through Harlequins’ demonstration gardens to observe some of these bees in action. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jun 23 at 1 PM           
MANAGING GARDEN PESTS WITHOUT POISONS 
with Mikl Brawner     

Learn how to look for and identify common pests, and how to judge if anything needs to be done. Learn which organic solutions are the most effective, for what, and how to do it. Mikl has been walking this talk for 35 years. Class cost: $15

JULY

Sun, Jul 14 at 1 PM        
TIPS & TRICKS OF XERISCAPE 
with Mikl Brawner

Gardening with less water is not that hard if you know how! There are tricks that will improve your success. Mikl’s will pass on his 30 years of xeriscape experience. Class cost: $15


 

Sat, Jul 20 at 10 AM       
HONEY BEE MEET & GREET 
with Kristina Williams 

Have you ever watched bees coming out of a knothole in an old tree or seen those stacks of boxes near a field and wondered what was inside? Come take a peek inside a working hive of honeybees and chat about what it takes to have a hive of your own or to help bees in general. Please wear long sleeves and pants. Class cost: $15
 

Sat, Jul 20 at 1 PM         
BASIC LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
with Elaine Walker    

Elaine is a landscape architect who will show you the elements of designing areas of your property. Learn how to observe your site, identify goals, take a site analysis, create a comprehensive design, and how to approach installation in manageable pieces. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Jul 21 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS —  P. 1:  REGIONAL MUSHROOM ID 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will learn the basics of mushroom identification and what you should know before going out on a hunt. We will also introduce a variety of local mushrooms and their identification features. This is a good class for beginners as well as those who have done some foraging before. Class cost: $15

Sun, Jul 28 at 10 AM     
FORAGING FOR ROCKY MOUNTAIN MUSHROOMS  —  P. 2: FORAGING FIELD TRIP 
with Zach Hedstrom 

In this class, you will take what you learned in the classroom and put it to practice on a mushroom hunting field trip in the mountains. Location given at registration.  Participants should come prepared with water, hats, and weather-appropriate clothing.  Pre-payment required: (303-939-9403).  Zach Hedstrom is a mushroom fanatic and grower at Hazel Dell! Class cost: $15.


AUGUST

Sun, Aug 11 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner                

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeated on Sep. 15). Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Aug 25 at 1 PM      
LOW TECH GREENHOUSE DESIGN & OPERATION 
with Mikl Brawner   

Mikl has been researching, building, and using simple greenhouses for 20 years. This class will focus on five designs on site at the nursery. Class cost: $15


SEPTEMBER

Sun, Sep 8 at 1 PM         
HOW TO MULCH with Mikl Brawner 

Weedbarrier, wood chips, straw, fine gravel, bark? Which mulches should be used and where? Why is mulching so important? What’s wrong with redwood and cedar? Mikl will discuss these questions and suggest solutions. Class cost: $15


 

Sun, Sep 15 at 1 PM      
PRUNING FOR STRENGTH, HEALTH, AND BEAUTY 
with Mikl Brawner    

Learn how to train young trees, restructure shrubs and trees damaged by storms, and to prune roses. Mikl has over 35 years of experience in pruning. (Repeat of Aug. 11) Class cost: $15
 

OCTOBER 

Sat, Oct 5 from 10 AM to 2 PM           
WHAT TO DO WHEN 
with Kelly Grummons 

Kelly Grummons of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.comdogtuffgrass.com) and plantselect.org will answer those oft-asked gardening questions such as: when do I prune my roses, start tomato seeds, seed grass, put down sod, cut back ornamental grasses, prune lilacs and clematis, apply soil microbes, when to fertilize, transplant perennials, divide iris, etc., etc.  Get the picture?!  Answers provided.  Kelly is one of the region’s preeminent horticulturists, and an expert in natural plant nutrition and pest control. Plan to bring a sack lunch. Class cost: $30
 




Referrals

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Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you at our May Day Sale and Celebration! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


Get all the latest news from your friends at Harlequin’s Gardens.
www.harlequinsgardens.com

May Day Sale & Celebration just a few days away!

MAY DAY SALE & CELEBRATION

JUST DAYS AWAY!

We’re stocking up for our May Dale Celebration and Sale which begins Monday, April 29!  The Sale will continue through May 5 and segues into our unique and delightful May Day Celebration on Saturday and Sunday, May 4 and 5.  Details about the sale and our May Day Celebration are below.  

In preparation we’ve received delivery upon delivery upon delivery from our propagators and suppliers!  We now have most of our tomato varieties in stock, an amazing selection of other veggies and culinary & medicinal herbs(including 4-packs of Nufar Genovese Basil!), and our annuals selection is growing.  Our hardy, own-root roses are available and ready to plant, including a new batch of roses in quart (4 ½”) pots, and we have lots and lots of neonic-free, pollinator-friendly perennials, natives, shrubs and trees in stock.  See below for some inventory listings.

To boost the success of your plants we also have a great selection of fertilizers, soil amendments and mulches.  

Grow your first, or your most successful ever veggie garden this year!  Our own Mimi Yanus will guide you in her very popular “Getting Started in Veggie Gardening” class this Saturday at 10 AM.  That afternoon at 1:00 Mikl will show you which shrubs should be pruned in the spring and how to do so in his “Spring Pruning Class”.

As our 

region becomes more arid, many people are choosing plants that require less water.  On Sunday at 10 AM Kelly Grummons, owner of Prairie Storm Nursery, will introduce you to “Dryer Plants for a New Landscape Era.”  Wind up the day with John Martin and Kayan Short of Stonebridge CSA Farm, class on “Growing Grapes on the Front Range” They will show how you can successfully grow table grapes and wine grapes on the Colorado Front Range. 

See below for more details and call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!


Help wanted at Harlequin’s Gardens

Doing plant production: planting, watering, weeding, and propagation of organic-no toxic pesticide plants. Physical outdoor work five days a week thru October, possibly later.   
Send your resume to staff@harlequinsgardens.com




Don’t Miss our May Day Plant Sale and Celebration! 

Historically, May Day is a festival of spring and flowers; an old-fashioned holiday that has been celebrated for many centuries, although it isn’t commonly celebrated any more in the modern US. This earth-based celebration is inspired by gratitude for fertility and set at a time when seeds sprout, plants begin growing and baby animals are born.  For Harlequin’s Gardens, this is not just a time to hold a sale, but rather a time to share a true celebration with you, our friends, with live music and dancers.

When Mikl was growing up in Iowa, it was customary for children to make small May Day Baskets out of paper and glue and fill them with flowers or candy.  After leaving the basket on a neighbor’s porch, he would ring their doorbell and run!  

A main-stay of our entertainment is the Maroon Bells Morris Dancers, who dance every May Day, come rain or shine, on behalf of fertility.  They dance all over the County, and have said that we, Harlequin’s Gardens, are their roots because we are an earth-based business connecting with the earth and growing things. 

A fun poem from the Maroon Bells Morris Dancers website colorfully explains more: 

We do it all day, we do it all night, 
because it is, a fertility rite! 
That and the beer. 
And it helps preserve a very old tradition, 
much like drinking beer. 
And it embarrasses our offspring, 
which we laugh about while drinking beer. 
And it’s more fun than aerobics, 
which means we can drink more beer. 
And it makes us attractive to the opposite sex, 
so we can drink beer together. 
And it’s a social activity, 
which includes drinking beer.

Schedule of Events

We have a many other wonderful entertainers joining us on Saturday and Sunday, May 4 and 5.  Our musicians, listed below, will provide great music to accompany your browsing. 


APRIL 29 thru MAY 5  

May Day Plant Sale

MAY 4 and 5

Annual May Day Celebration and Cinco de Mayo


SATURDAY, MAY 4 

10 AM: Maroon Bells Morris Dancers bring us fertility and merriment
11:30 AM: enjoy the duo Martian Acres playing classic pop and originals
1:30 PM: move to Bistro Marimba with the music of Zimbabwe

SUNDAY, MAY 5, CINCO DE MAYO

Light refreshments will be served
11:30 AM: Boulder Irish Sessionjig and reel with Boulder’s finest Irish tunes and songs!
1:00 PM: local harpist Margo Krimmel will treat us to the tunes of O’Carolan and other fine melodies
 



May Day Plant Sale beginning Monday, April 29! 

Our Store, Bee Barn, and Plant Shelves swill be full to bursting when you visit!   2019 Members will be eligible for a $10 discount on a $50 or more purchase of plants (excluding roses & fruit trees) during that time frame!

DEEP DISCOUNT PLANTS!

Not the dregs! These are wonderful, neonic-free plants in prime condition, ready for planting in your garden!

MEMBERSHIP

Memberships help Harlequin’s to do those extras that are so valuable to the community but that are not profitable, like: 5 demonstration gardens of Natives, low-water groundcovers, the New Western Garden etc; plus plastic pot recycling; plant and pest identification for customers; hand-outs on many subjects like pollinator plants, how to plant, what blooms in July etc; local seed collecting and propagation, and more.

If you like what we have been doing, please become a member and help us to do it better, and enjoy the benefits of membership.  For a $20 donation, you’ll receive membership for the current calendar year and the following benefits:

1)  Half-price Harlequin’s Class of your choice. (Restricted to regular $15 and $20 classes.)
2)  25% discount on books all year

3)  During the May Day Week get $10 off a $50 or more purchase of plants (excluding roses & fruit trees)
4)  During May Day Week, take 10% off roses (except quarts), then
5)  in August begin the fall sale a week early with 20% off most everything.

You can become a member anytime you are at the nursery, or mail a check for $20 to
Harlequin’s Gardens
4795 N.26th St.
Boulder, CO. 80301

We will put you in our Membership file. A membership is valid until the end of the calendar year.
THANK YOU TO ALL OUR MEMBERS!!!




TOMATO STARTS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE 

Below is our current listing of tomatoes.  Please see our website for descriptions. 



WARM-SEASON VEGGIES & HERB STARTS 

Nufar Basil
Okra ‘Jambalaya’
Okra ‘Stelley
Aunt Molly’s Ground Cherry

 



COOL-SEASON VEGGIE STARTS 

Artichoke
Arugula
Asian Greens
Beets
Broccoli
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Celeriac
Celery
Chard
Chinese Cabbage
Cilantro
Collards
Endive
Kohlrabi
Leeks
Onions
Perennial Spinach (Hablitzia tamnoides)

Radicchio
Spinach



ANNUALS 

Amaranth ‘Hopi Red Dye’
Calendula ‘Pacific Beauty’
California Poppy – 5 colors!
Datura meteloides
Datura ‘Purple Currant Swirl’
Desert Bluebells
Ammi majus 
Lobelia ‘Crystal Palace’
Marigold ‘Lemon Gem’
Marigold ‘Red Marietta’
Nasturtiums
Sage ‘Blue Monday’
Sage ‘Pink Sunday’
Sweet Alyssum ‘Oriental Nights’
Sweet Alyssum ‘Tiny Tim’

 



APRIL & MAY CLASS LIST

Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!

Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  

APRIL


Sat, Apr 27 at 10 AM       
GETTING STARTED IN VEGETABLE GARDENING with Mimi Yanus

If you are new to Colorado, new to vegetable gardening, or have been unhappy with the results of your earlier attempts, this class is for you. Learn from Mimi what you need to know to make your new organic vegetable garden successful and bountiful, even in Colorado conditions!  (Class repeated by popular demand!)  Class cost: $15

Sat, Apr 27 at 1 PM      
SPRING PRUNING with Mikl Brawner

There are shrubs that should not be pruned in the spring and there are shrubs, roses and vines that are best pruned in spring. Learn which to prune when, and how to prune for strength, beauty, and production of fruit and flowers. (Rescheduled from April 14.  This is not a repeat of the Fall Pruning Class.) Class cost: $15



Sun Apr 28 at 10 AM
DRYER PLANTS FOR A NEW LANDSCAPE ERA with Kelly Grummons

Many beautiful cacti, century plants (Agave spp.), yuccas, and their relatives thrive in our harsh climate. These plants look as good in the winter garden as they do in the summer. Kelly is well known for his work with these hardy plants and is expert at using them in the garden. We’ll discuss companion plants, soil preparation and garden construction. Kelly Grummons is an accomplished Horticulturist, one of our region’s most important plant breeders, and Owner of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.com and dogtuffgrass.com).  Class cost: $20
 

Sun Apr 28 at 1 PM      
GROWING GRAPES ON THE FRONT RANGE with John Martin

Thanks to recent development in grape varieties, you, too can successfully grow table grapes and wine grapes on the Colorado Front Range. This workshop will present an overview of varieties suitable for this region, considerations for site location, trellising options, pest protection measures, and a brush across two basic pruning techniques.  Whether you are interested in fruit or wine, let’s explore how the taste of your grapes and wineswill define this locality. John and his partner, Kayann Short, tend nine different varieties of grapes and make wine at their CSA farm, Stonebridge, in Longmont.  Class cost: $15
 


MAY

Sat, May 11 at 1 PM           
VERMICOMPOSTINGwith John Anderson 

The many ways worms can save the planet – they are nature’s gift that keeps on giving! Worm Man, John Anderson, will explain why and how you can create worm compost. The hope and change we’ve been waiting for right under your feet!  Worms will be available for purchase at the class for $40, plus the class fee of $15.  Call 303-939-9403 to pre-order worms by April 30th at a $5 discount.
 

Sat, May 18 at 10 AM        
GARDENING WITH FRIENDS: INVITING WILDLIFE INTO YOUR GARDEN THROUGH LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck 

Living in a garden humming with life is a joy! Share you yard with birds, butterflies, pollinators and more.  You’ll learn how to provide a home for all life (maybe not deer), and why insects are a gardener’s friend, not the enemy. We’ll discuss overall landscape design strategies, as well as detailed information on plants that provide wildlife habitat, including many native plants. Alison has been designing landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping. Class cost: $15. 

Sat, May 18 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HIGH-ALTITUDE LANDSCAPE GARDENING with Irene Shonle

Mountain gardening is a challenge, with the short growing season, cold winters, water rights issues, critters and more. In this class, Irene will talk about ways to work with these challenges, and will discuss a palette of good mountain-hardy perennials, shrubs and trees that are low-water and provide pollinator/bird benefits.Irene Shonle is the Director of CSU Extension in Gilpin County. She holds a PhD in Ecology from U. of Chicago. She teaches and writes about native plants all across the state and is very involved with the Native Plant Master Program. She gardens (mostly with natives) in the mountains at her home and in demo gardens outside the Extension Office. Class cost: $15
 

Sun, May 19 at 10 AM
Tomato Tutelage 
with Kelly Grummons: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO GROW GREAT TOMATOES!

This class takes the mystery out of growing good tomatoes in our area. You always hear “It’s a good tomato year” or “It’s a bad tomato year”. Learn how to make EVERY year a “good tomato year”! Kelly will discuss garden soil preparation, culture in the ground and in pots, nutrition, tomato pests and diseases. Learn about the best varieties to grow here and how to maximize your harvest. Kelly Grummons is a horticulturalist and tomato aficionado. Class Cost: $20
 

Sun, May 19 at 1 PM     
BEST FRUIT TREES FOR COLORADO 
with Mikl Brawner

Learn which varieties of fruit trees are successful here, which are not, and which are good flavored: Apples, Cherries, Plums, Pears, Peaches. Mikl’s first orchard was in 1976 and he will teach you how to care for your fruit trees. Class cost: $15
 




Referrals

Know anyone that would also enjoy receiving our blogs?  If so, forward this blog to them and they can click here to subscribe. 

Social Media

Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for the most up-to-date information and photos! We’re looking forward to seeing you at our May Day Sale and Celebration! In gratitude,
Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens

TOMATOES ARE ROLLING IN!

With a Solar Cap, it’s not too early to plant them
It’s veggie planting season and we’re stocked for you!  We have an abundant selection of cool season veggies (think, kale, chard, brassicas, etc.)  that are very keen to get into the soil!  We have four types of potato starts (see below), two types of asparagus (Jersey Knight and Purple Passion), and two remaining selections of onion starts (Copra and Walla Walla).  In addition, our Botanical Interests, Seed Savers, and Beauty Beyond Belief seeds have been restocked, including warm season seeds.   And, if that weren’t enough, our tomato starts have rolled in!  We’re excited about our selections this year and hope that you’ll stop by to get yours soon!  See below for information on early tomato planting.  

We also continue to receive abundant deliveries of fabulous pesticide-free, interesting and unique perennials!   As you clean-up your garden this spring, don’t let rose pruning intimidate you!  This Saturday at 1:00, Eve will demonstrate and discuss why and how to prune roses in a fearless and confident manner. It’s a very popular and valuable class!  See below for more details and call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat!  

Another helpful spring tool is our new horticultural vinegar.  Green Gobbler is 20% acidity (versus the 2-3% acidity of white kitchen vinegar) and is an effective treatment for emerging and established weeds. Tough dandelions may need repeat application for best results.  Best of all, by using horticultural grade vinegar, you avoid the negative environmental impacts of products containing glyphosate. 

As of April 1 we’re now OPEN DAILY from 9 AM to 5 PM, and until 6 PM on Thursdays. 


Help wanted at Harlequin’s Gardens Doing plant production: planting, watering, weeding, and propagation of organic-no toxic pesticide plants. Physical outdoor work five days a week thru October, possibly later.   
Send your resume to staff@harlequinsgardens.com

 
CURRENT TOMATO AVAILABILITY  Below is our current listing of tomatoes.  Please see our website for descriptions. 

Anasazi
Aunt Gertie’s Gold
Azoychka
Black Cherry
Black from Tula (pictured right, top)
Black Prince
Black Sea Man
Burbank Slicing
Carbon
Cream Sausage
Everett’s Rusty Oxheart
Gardener’s Delight
Gold Medal
Gold Nugget
Honey Drop
Juliet
Kellogg’s Breakfast
Malachite Box
Paul Robeson
Pink Brandywine
San Marzano Redorta
Striped German
Stupice
Sungold hyb.
Super Sioux / Super Lakota
Super-Sweet 100 (pictured right, bottom) 
Thessaloniki
Weaver’s Black Brandywine
 
EARLY TOMATO PLANTING  If you want to get an early start on your tomatoes and other warm-season vegetables, it’s important to provide a warm and protected environment for them.  Here’s how you can get the best results. 
SOIL THERMOMETER  For just a few dollars, a soil thermometer can be one of your most valuable garden guides.  Soil temperatures directly affect plant growth, and different plants need different soil temperatures in which to thrive.  Tomatoes need a minimum soil temperature of 55+ Fahrenheit. Planting in cold soil can cause plants to be stunted and weak.
  SOLAR CAPS  Solar Caps are a vast improvement over the well-known Wall-o-Water, which are prone to collapsing and crushing your plants! Solar Caps have 8 wire legs that keep it firmly secured in place. Solar Caps don’t have all those seams to leak, and the only part that requires annual replacement is the very inexpensive customized plastic bag. We like to keep the Solar Caps on our vining tomatoes throughout the season to moderate soil temperatures. They can be used to get a head-start on Peppers, Eggplants, Squashes, Cucumbers and Melons, but should be removed from those shorter plants when temperatures allow.  Solar Caps also provide a sure way to protect your plants from cold temps and snow! 

Solar Caps consist of a sturdy, re-usable, welded galvanized steel wire frame over which you drape the water-filled plastic bag that comes with the kit.  By positioning the Solar Cap where your tomato (or other warm-season veggies) will be planted, in 5-7 days your soil will be warm enough for planting (55+ Fahrenheit).  Following planting, Solar Caps form a personal greenhouse for your veggies, which improves growth throughout the season.  We’ve had great success using them for many years and we usually start planting tomatoes around April 15.  Solar Caps should be used when planting tomatoes between Mid-April and Mid-May. 
  For mountain gardeners: After the tomato plant reaches the top of the solar cap, you can leave the solar cap in place and insert your tomato cage directly into the solar cap (even when using a container or Earth Box!), or place it around the Solar Cap.  This will allow your tomato to remain warmer during cool summer nights. 
 
POTATO STARTS  We still have a good selection of potoato starts including Kennebec, Mountain Rose, and Purple Majesty selections, all grown here in Colorado.*  We have selected these varieties because they all grow very successfully here.   See below and our website for descriptions.   KENNEBEC  (Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Kennebec is an excellent, widely adapted, medium to late, all-purpose, white potato, bred by the USDA in 1941. This fast-growing variety has high yields of round to oblong tubers with shallow eyes, buff skin and white flesh that maintain good quality in storage. Plants do best when planted at 8-10” spacing to avoid overly-large tubers. The ivory flesh is firm and starchy with minimal water content and offers a rich, earthy and nutty flavor. Excels as a frying potato (fries, hash browns, chips, etc.) and is well suited for baking, mashing or roasting. Kennebec potatoes keep their shape when cooked, perfect for potato salads, curries, soups, stews.Resistant to Potato Virus A and Potato Virus Y; moderate resistance to Potato Virus S, Potato Virus X, blackleg, and foliage late blight.  MOUNTAIN ROSE   (Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Red inside and out! Bred in & for Colorado. Excellent as potato chips, French fries, oven fries, and also great for baking, mashing, and potato salads. High in antioxidants!  Early to Mid-season. PURPLE MAJESTY (Certified ‘seed’ potato)
Uniform, high-yield, deep purple skin and flesh, very high in anthocyanins (high-potency antioxidant).  Bred in and for Colorado. They are delicious roasted, baked, sliced for home-made chips, mashed..

*Our seed potatoes this year are not certified organic. They ARE “Certified Seed”, which means they have been tested and found free of disease (late blight – think Ireland’s Potato Famine). Potatoes sold for eating are NOT tested or certified; that’s why we do not recommend planting potatoes from the grocery store or farmer’s market. Our seed potatoes have been grown the same way as their organic crop, with the addition of an application of sulfur.  Our supplier was unable to sell their certified organic seed potatoes this year for planting because they didn’t qualify as disease-free.   Potato Growing Instructions From our friend, Frank Hodge

Potatoes grow best in full sun.  Plant seed potatoes (pieces of potatoes or small whole potatoes – plant whole if they are smaller than a golf ball) with at least 2 eyes per piece. If you are cutting up the potatoes, do so ahead of time (couple hours to a day prior to planting) to give them a chance to form a protective layer for moisture retention and rot resistance.

Plant as soon as when soil can be easily worked.  Plants will begin to grow when the soil temperature reaches 45 degrees.  Plants can tolerate a light frost but be prepared to cover them if a hard frost is expected.

Spread and mix compost into the bottom of a 4-6” deep planting trench. Soil should be moist, but not water-logged.  Plant seed potatoes 4” deep, 1 foot apart, with the eye side up. Potatoes thrive in LOOSE, well drained soil with consistent moisture.  

When plants reach about 6” tall, cover them with light compost or straw until just the top inch or two still shows. Continue to cover the plants (called hilling) as they grow. This will result in a fairly significantly sized mound.  Harvest potatoes on a dry day. Soil should NOT be compacted, so digging should be easy, but be gentle so as not to puncture the tubers.  “New” (small) potatoes may be ready in early July.  Mature potatoes should be harvested 2-3 weeks after the vines die (usually late July / early August). Brush off any soil, and store them in a cool, dry, dark place (but not in the refrigerator).  Do not store potatoes with apples as the ethylene gas produced by the apples can cause your potatoes to spoil. Do not wash potatoes until right before use.
 
APRIL & MAY CLASS LIST Call 303-939-9403 to reserve your seat! Our weekends are loaded with great classes you won’t want to miss! Our customers tell us that our classes have given them tremendous value, with practical and current information from local experts who have spent years honing their skills in Colorado and will help guide you to success. We are charging $15 (unless otherwise stated) for our classes to support our speakers and Harlequin’s educational direction. It is best to pre-register for these classes both in case they fill up, or too few people register and we have to cancel. Pre-payment assures your place in the class. You can register at the nursery, by mail, or by calling 303-939-9403. We are unable to take class registration by email at this time.  Most of our classes run from one-and-a-half to two hours in length, and sometimes longer for hands-on classes, or if there are a large number of questions.  See the complete listing on our website.  
  APRIL
Sat, Apr 20 at 1 PM      
FEARLESS ROSE PRUNING with Eve Brawner Eve will demonstrate and discuss why and how to prune roses in a fearless and confident manner. She will also discuss feeding, watering, etc. to maximize your success with growing roses. Wear long pants, long sleeves, gloves, and a hat and be prepared to be outside. Class cost: $15
 
Sat, Apr 27 at 10 AM       
GETTING STARTED IN VEGETABLE GARDENING with Mimi Yanus If you are new to Colorado, new to vegetable gardening, or have been unhappy with the results of your earlier attempts, this class is for you. Learn from Mimi what you need to know to make your new organic vegetable garden successful and bountiful, even in Colorado conditions!  (Class repeated by popular demand!)  Class cost: $15

  Sat, Apr 27 at 1 PM      
SPRING PRUNING with Mikl Brawner There are shrubs that should not be pruned in the spring and there are shrubs, roses and vines that are best pruned in spring. Learn which to prune when, and how to prune for strength, beauty, and production of fruit and flowers. (Rescheduled from April 14.  This is not a repeat of the Fall Pruning Class.) Class cost: $15

Sun Apr 28 at 10 AM
DRYER PLANTS FOR A NEW LANDSCAPE ERA with Kelly Grummons Many beautiful cacti, century plants (Agave spp.), yuccas, and their relatives thrive in our harsh climate. These plants look as good in the winter garden as they do in the summer. Kelly is well known for his work with these hardy plants and is expert at using them in the garden. We’ll discuss companion plants, soil preparation and garden construction. Kelly Grummons is a Horticulturist and Owner of Prairie Storm Nursery (coldhardycactus.com and dogtuffgrass.com).  Class cost: $20
  Sun Apr 28 at 1 PM      
GROWING GRAPES ON THE FRONT RANGE with John Martin Thanks to recent development in grape varieties, you, too can successfully grow table grapes and wine grapes on the Colorado Front Range. This workshop will present an overview of varieties suitable for this region, considerations for site location, trellising options, pest protection measures, and a brush across two basic pruning techniques.  Whether you are interested in fruit or wine, let’s explore how the taste of your grapes and wineswill define this locality. John and his partner, Kayann Short, tend nine different varieties of grapes and make wine at their CSA farm, Stonebridge, in Longmont.  Class cost: $15
  MAY Sat, May 11 at 1 PM           
VERMICOMPOSTINGwith John Anderson  The many ways worms can save the planet – they are nature’s gift that keeps on giving! Worm Man, John Anderson, will explain why and how you can create worm compost. The hope and change we’ve been waiting for right under your feet!  Worms will be available for purchase at the class for $40, plus the class fee of $15.  Call 303-939-9403 to pre-order worms by April 30th at a $5 discount.
  Sat, May 18 at 10 AM        
GARDENING WITH FRIENDS: INVITING WILDLIFE INTO YOUR GARDEN THROUGH LANDSCAPING with Alison Peck  Living in a garden humming with life is a joy! Share you yard with birds, butterflies, pollinators and more.  You’ll learn how to provide a home for all life (maybe not deer), and why insects are a gardener’s friend, not the enemy. We’ll discuss overall landscape design strategies, as well as detailed information on plants that provide wildlife habitat, including many native plants. Alison has been designing landscapes for 25 years; she owns Matrix Gardens landscaping. Class cost: $15.  Sat, May 18 at 1 PM           
SUCCESSFUL HIGH-ALTITUDE LANDSCAPE GARDENING with Irene Shonle Mountain gardening is a challenge, with the short growing season, cold winters, water rights issues, critters and more. In this class, Irene will talk about ways to work with these challenges, and will discuss a palette of good mountain-hardy perennials, shrubs and trees that are low-water and provide pollinator/bird benefits. Irene Shonle is the Director of CSU Extension in Gilpin County. She holds a PhD in Ecology from U. of Chicago. She teaches and writes about native plants all across the state and is very involved with the Native Plant Master Program. She gardens (mostly with natives) in the mountains at her home and in demo gardens outside the Extension Office. Class cost: $15
  Sun, May 19 at 10 AM
Tomato Tutelage 
with Kelly Grummons: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO GROW GREAT TOMATOES! This class takes the mystery out of growing good tomatoes in our area. You always hear “It’s a good tomato year” or “It’s a bad tomato year”. Learn how to make EVERY year a “good tomato year”! Kelly will discuss garden soil preparation, culture in the ground and in pots, nutrition, tomato pests and diseases. Learn about the best varieties to grow here and how to maximize your harvest. Kelly Grummons is a horticulturalist and tomato aficionado. Class Cost: $20
  Sun, May 19 at 1 PM     
BEST FRUIT TREES FOR COLORADO 
with Mikl Brawner Learn which varieties of fruit trees are successful here, which are not, and which are good flavored: Apples, Cherries, Plums, Pears, Peaches. Mikl’s first orchard was in 1976 and he will teach you how to care for your fruit trees. Class cost: $15
 
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Eve, Mikl
and the super hard-working Staff at Harlequin’s Gardens


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